Send a Tweet
Most Popular Choices
Poll Analyses
Share on Facebook 58 Share on Twitter 2 Printer Friendly Page More Sharing
OpEdNews Op Eds   

Photo ID is Obsolete and Unnecessary. Facial Recognition Technology Makes it Dangerous.

By       (Page 1 of 1 pages) (View How Many People Read This)   5 comments
Author 76576
Follow Me on Twitter     Message Thomas Knapp

Florida Driver License.
Florida Driver License.
(Image by (From Wikimedia) Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles / https://flhsmv.gov/driver-licenses-id-cards/newdl/, Author: See Source)
  Details   Source   DMCA

In mid-May, San Francisco, California became the first American city to ban use of facial recognition surveillance technology by its police department and other city agencies. That's a wise and ethical policy, as a July 7 piece at the Washington Post proves.

Citing documents gathered by Georgetown Law researchers, the Post reports that at least two federal agencies, the Federal Bureau of Investigation and Immigration and Customs Enforcement, have -- for years -- mined state photo ID databases to populate their own facial recognition databases.

To put a finer point on it, those agencies have been conducting warrantless searches, seizing private biometric data on the entire population of the United States, most of whom are neither charged with, nor suspected of committing, a crime.

They've conducted these fishing expeditions not just without warrants, but absent even the fig leaf of legislation from Congress or state legislatures to lend supposed legitimacy to the programs.

The Post story, intentionally or not, makes it clear that Congress must follow San Francisco's example and ban use of facial recognition technology, as well as repeal its national photo ID ("REAL ID") scheme, and require federal agencies to delete their facial recognition databases. The states should either lead the way or follow suit by doing away with government-issued photo identification altogether.

Photo ID has always been marginally useful at best. Anyone who's ever worked at a bar or liquor store knows that it's unreliable on a visual check -- and that its uses have been stretched far beyond its supposed purposes.

The most common form of photo ID is the driver's license. States imposed their licensing schemes on a seemingly justifiable pretext: A driver's license proves that the driver whose photograph appears on it has taken and passed a test demonstrating safety and proficiency behind the wheel.

There are ways to do that without a photo. Three that come to mind are a fingerprint, a digitized summary of an iris scan, or a similar summary of a DNA scan.

Yes, those methods are more expensive and impose a slightly higher burden on law enforcement in identifying a driver who's been pulled over or arrested (and on anyone else who wants to confirm an individual's identity). But they're also far more reliable and less easily used in pulling police-state type abuses like those described in the Post story. They can't be used for easy warrantless searches via distant cameras.

In recent decades, and especially since 9/11, the conversation over personal privacy has revolved around how much of that privacy "must" be sacrificed to make law enforcement's job easier.

The answer to that question is "none."

It's not an American's job to make law enforcement's job easier. It's law enforcement's job to respect that American's rights.

Since law enforcement has continuously proven itself both unwilling and untrustworthy on that count, we need to deprive it of tools that enable that unwillingness and untrustworthiness.

Photo ID is obsolete and unnecessary. Facial recognition technology makes it dangerous. Let's take those tools away from their abusers.

 

Must Read 3   Well Said 2   Valuable 2  
Rate It | View Ratings

Thomas Knapp Social Media Pages: Facebook page url on login Profile not filled in       Twitter page url on login Profile not filled in       Linkedin page url on login Profile not filled in       Instagram page url on login Profile not filled in

Thomas L. Knapp is director and senior news analyst at the William Lloyd Garrison Center for Libertarian Advocacy Journalism (thegarrisoncenter.org). He lives and works in north central Florida.


Go To Commenting
The views expressed herein are the sole responsibility of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of this website or its editors.
Follow Me on Twitter     Writers Guidelines
Contact AuthorContact Author Contact EditorContact Editor Author PageView Authors' Articles
Support OpEdNews

OpEdNews depends upon can't survive without your help.

If you value this article and the work of OpEdNews, please either Donate or Purchase a premium membership.

STAY IN THE KNOW
If you've enjoyed this, sign up for our daily or weekly newsletter to get lots of great progressive content.
Daily Weekly     OpEdNews Newsletter
Name
Email
   (Opens new browser window)
 

Most Popular Articles by this Author:     (View All Most Popular Articles by this Author)

America Doesn't Have Presidential Debates, But It Should

Hypocrisy Alert: Republicans Agreed with Ocasio-Cortez Until About One Minute Ago

Finally, Evidence of Russian Election Meddling ... Oh, Wait

Chickenhawk Donald: A Complete and Total Disgrace

The Nunes Memo Only Partially "Vindicates" Trump, But it Fully Indicts the FBI and the FISA Court

If You've Got Nothing to Hide, You've Got Nothing to Fear, JFK Assassination Edition

To View Comments or Join the Conversation: