Share on Google Plus Share on Twitter 1 Share on Facebook 2 Share on LinkedIn Share on PInterest Share on Fark! Share on Reddit Share on StumbleUpon Tell A Friend (3 Shares)  

Printer Friendly Page Save As Favorite View Favorites (# of views)   4 comments
OpEdNews Op Eds

The hidden roots of Egypt's despair

By       Message Danny Schechter     Permalink
      (Page 1 of 2 pages)
Related Topic(s): ; ; , Add Tags Add to My Group(s)

Must Read 2   News 2   Interesting 2  
View Ratings | Rate It

opednews.com Headlined to H2 2/1/11

- Advertisement -

The global financial crisis' fallout is one of the main impetuses leading up to the economic despair of the Egyptian populace  [CC - rednuht]

This is an upstairs/downstairs story that takes us from the peak of a Western mountaintop for the wealthy to spreading mass despair in the valleys of the Third World poor.

It is about how the solutions for the world financial crisis that the CEOs and Big pols are massaging in a posh conference centre in snowy Davos, Switzerland have turned into a global economic catastrophe in the streets of Cairo, the current ground zero of a certain-to-spread wave of international unrest.

Yes, the tens of thousands in the streets demanding the ouster of the cruel Mubarak regime are pressing for their right to make a political choice, but they are being driven by an economic disaster that have sent unemployment skyrocketing and food prices climbing.

People are out in the streets not just to meet but by their need to eat.

As Nouriel Roubini -- who was among the first to predict the financial crisis while others were pooh-poohing him as "Dr Doom" -- says, don't just look at the crowds in Cairo, but what is motivating them now after years of silence and repression.

He says that the dramatic rise in energy and food prices has become a major global threat and a leading factor that has gone largely unreported in the coverage of events in Egypt.

"What has happened in Tunisia is happening right now in Egypt, but also riots in Morocco, Algeria and Pakistan are related not only to high unemployment rates and to income and wealth inequality, but also to this very sharp rise in food and commodity prices," Roubini said.

For instance, prices in Egypt are up 17% because of a worldwide surge in commodity prices.

- Advertisement -

Now here's a key fact buried in a CNN Money report -- the kind intended for investors, not the public at large: "About 40% of Egypt's citizens live off less than $2 a day, so any price increase hurts."

Think about that: what would you be doing if you were living off $2 a day? You won't be drinking mochaccinos at Starbucks, that's for sure.

Trust me, the people on top are following this unrest closely on Wall Street as anxiety grows. Reports the Washington Post:

US stocks declined sharply Friday as violent clashes in Egypt injected a jolt of anxiety into global financial markets.

Egypt is central to US interests in the Middle East as a moderate state and a key player in both counter-terrorism operations and regional peace negotiations, said Helima L. Croft, a geopolitical analyst at Barclays Capital.

If street protests were to end president Hosni Mubarak's nearly 30-year hold on power, "I think there would be a fear that you could see radicalism sweeping across the Middle East," Croft said, adding that the fear might be unfounded.

- Advertisement -

Beyond its political significance, Egypt controls the Suez Canal, an important shipping lane.

Suddenly, there are worries about Egypt not being able to pay off its debt, and suddenly was pronounced riskier than Iraq, according to Bloomberg:

The cost of protecting Egyptian debt against default for five years with the contracts jumped 69 basis points, or 0.69 per cent points, this week to 375 today, compared with 328 for Iraq, according to prices from CMA, a data provider in London. Just last week, Iraqi swaps cost 19 basis points more than Egypt's, and in June, an average 240 basis points more, as Iraq recovered from the US-led invasion in 2003.

The unrest, inspired by the revolt that toppled Tunisia's leader, "does raise political risks," said Eric Fine, a portfolio manager in New York who helps Van Eck Associates Corp. oversee $3 billion in emerging-market assets. "If this is a revolution, the price of risk for Egypt could go much higher, and if it's a failed one" the cost will drop to 300 basis points and probably 250, Fine said in a phone interview.

Next Page  1  |  2

 

- Advertisement -

Must Read 2   News 2   Interesting 2  
View Ratings | Rate It

News Dissector Danny Schechter is blogger in chief at Mediachannel.Org He is the author of PLUNDER: Investigating Our Economic Calamity (Cosimo Books) available at Amazon.com. See Newsdisssector.org/store.htm.

Share on Google Plus Submit to Twitter Add this Page to Facebook! Share on LinkedIn Pin It! Add this Page to Fark! Submit to Reddit Submit to Stumble Upon



Go To Commenting
/* The Petition Site */
The views expressed in this article are the sole responsibility of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of this website or its editors.

Writers Guidelines

Contact AuthorContact Author Contact EditorContact Editor Author PageView Authors' Articles
- Advertisement -

Most Popular Articles by this Author:     (View All Most Popular Articles by this Author)

Israel Gives All Jews A Bad Name

Is There A Threat of Fascism in the USA?

Free Marketers Going After Occupy Wall Street --Danny Schechter

COG OR COA: WHY IS OBAMA MORPHING INTO BUSH 2?

WHO OWNS OUR MEDIA AND WHY IT MATTERS

WERE THE BANKS TOO BIG TO FAIL OR THE BANKERS TOO BIG TO JAIL?