Send a Tweet
Most Popular Choices
Share on Facebook 9 Share on Twitter Printer Friendly Page More Sharing
Exclusive to OpEdNews:
Positive News    H5'ed 11/19/21

Transformation: Applied Principles of Psychosynthesis with Schizophrenic Clients and Their Families Pt. 2

Become a Premium Member Would you like to know how many people have read this article? Or how reputable the author is? Simply sign up for a Advocate premium membership and you'll automatically see this data on every article. Plus a lot more, too.
Author 71296
Message Blair Gelbond

A mentally ill patient in a strait-jacket attached to the wa Wellcome V0016643ER.
A mentally ill patient in a strait-jacket attached to the wa Wellcome V0016643ER.
(Image by Wikipedia (commons.wikimedia.org), Author: Author Not Given)
  Details   Source   DMCA

(con't)

Therapeutic Work Begins

Following hospitalization (usually involuntary) in the locked ward of the local state facility, clients are referred to the aftercare agency. The clinic, which houses a staffed drop-in center and an activities program, as well as a team of therapists (of which I was a member), which functions as a link in a larger network providing services to chronically ill clients. These include the locked ward of the state hospital, a quarter-way house on the grounds of the hospital, two open wards at nearby general hospitals, staffed and cooperative apartments in the community, a number of sheltered workshops, a day hospital, and a mental health clinic.

The therapy team itself utilizes a family system, psychoeducational model incorporating the recent research of Anderson et al., Dincin et al., Brown et al., and Bowen. This model is implemented via individual and family therapy as well as through a network of groups led by team therapists. (Currently, the network includes regular meetings of a "next step" group for clients preparing to leave the locked ward, a client education group for clients in the community, two multiple-family groups [composed of schizophrenic clients and their parents], a parent support group, a sibling group, and a family education evening).

Key aspects of work with clients include aiding them in accepting and taking responsibility for their illness, the provision of up-to-date information on the dysfunction itself, and open discussion of the feelings associated with rehabilitation. Important discussions for family members include sharing of research data concerning family management in chronic mental illness and provision of relevant data about the illness and current treatments.

A non-blaming attitude (both toward themselves or the affected family member) was stressed. Themes discussed include violence, negotiations with professionals, and the need for limit-setting with the ill member. Keeping an on-going, satisfying family life in the midst of financial and social disarray is another common topic. Providing warmth and sustenance to the ill family member without overprotection was yet another concern.

The self-help aspects of such groups provide immediate opportunities for family members to care for and to offer knowledge to others, as well as to receive them from others. Professionals play roles as facilitators, psychotherapists, and teachers. Yet a clear message is given: family members and agency clients have much to contribute to one another. Grief, rage, guilt, frustration, shame, and anguish are the difficult feelings often accompanying these discussions. "At least," family members comment, "we are not alone."

Aftercare programs for clients and families such as this one, are still quite rare. Financial and legislative realities often make for understaffed programs and overworked professionals. And as Torrey notes: "Those who defy the laws of social gravity and devote their careers to the seriously ill stand out as exceptions...they are however always considered somewhat aberrant by their peers." As Torrey also states, the majority of mental health workers, including psychiatrists, want to treat comparatively healthy and insightful clients. Schizophrenic patients tend to be seen as dull and difficult - their families unimportant.

Applied Psychosynthesis

In this section, an overview of the use of psychosynthesis principles is presented in three contexts: (1) as individual counseling with schizophrenic individuals; (2) as utilized with families; and (3) as employed within a milieu treatment setting for the benefit of both staff and clients. Basic to work at each of these levels is the need to mobilize the natural helping and healing energies within a network of people - be they impaired individuals, family members, or staff persons.

Creating an atmosphere of trusting communication, good will, and intensive learning is the primary mode by which persons are able to redefine themselves as resources for, and helpers of, one another.

Because the principles of psychosynthesis are embedded in the process of life itself - and only articulated and formalized through theory and practice - it need not come as a surprise that healers dedicated to meeting the challenge of chronic mental illness have come upon, without needing formal training, the pragmatic approach described below.

My individual work with clients has been informed by the conscious use of psychosynthesis as well as family systems and object relations theory; however, others who have contributed to the work with individuals and families and to the creation of the climate of the treatment setting have had no formal training in psychosynthesis. Rather, they have accumulated a rich fund of theory and experience through years of work with the mentally ill.

Individual work with schizophrenic individuals must be done on a scaled-down basis in contrast to work with individuals diagnosed as borderline or neurotic. Generally, work is much more concrete since, for many clients, attention span and abstract thinking are quite impaired.

Facilitating the client's development of ego functions is a basis for therapy, and these include the ability to observe and think rationally (instead of regressing to primary-process thinking), to learn self-soothing techniques, and to control anxiety and impulses so that they are not overwhelming.

Also important is the client's learning to recognize and put limits on projections and regressive patterns. In these respects, such directions in individual work are parallel to work with borderline clients as listed by Friedman, but at a slower and more gradual pace. It can be seen that much of the work centers on the creation of defenses (e.g., the ability to control drives and feelings); in contrast, work with neurotic clients often consists of allowing greater spontaneity, deeper contact with and expression of emotion, and so on.

Research states unequivocally that deeper insight-oriented individual therapy is not only useless but also detrimental to schizophrenic clients. A predictable consequence of such therapy can be described as analogous to directing a flood into a town already ravaged by a tornado. It is "unleashing a cacophony of repressed thoughts and wishes into the existing internal maelstrom."

Assagioli was in basic agreement with the need to offer caution concerning the use of active techniques with such clients, noting, for instance, that work with imagination and imagery should be employed with great caution and only after a certain consolidation and stabilization of the personality has been achieved. He stressed the importance of the client's gaining a clear understanding of the laws and mechanisms of his or her unique psychological reality, adding that regression to more primitive stages and uncontrolled release of explosive emotions would be likely results of premature explorations.

Research indicates, however, that a supportive, long-term relationship with a mental health professional combined with symptom-reducing medication and a sustaining social support system provides individuals with the best chances of reduced hospitalizations and greater success adjusting to life in the community.

Such a supportive relationship is seen as a blend of caring friendship, advice, and practical help in securing financial and other supportive services in the community. It can be seen that the typical psychotherapist role is of less use here than a flexible person-to-person connection. Work with one client may last an hour at a time, while with another, particularly if he or she is involved with other mental health professionals, contacts of short duration (10 to 20 minutes a week) may be optimal.

While contact with clients should have the tone of friendship and simplicity, it is important that the therapist bring all the clinical sophistication at his or her disposal to the relationship; he is essentially a guide, enabling one who has lost touch with the life and thought of the community to return gradually to psychological balance and more harmonious participation with others. In psychosynthesis, the word "guide" is often used in place of "therapist" to connote the combination of mutual relation and applied skill in the therapy relationship. Such a term fits nicely with the need to blend simplicity and directness with skillful assessment and practice.

Brown quotes Carl Rogers in emphasizing a basic quality of the psychosynthesis guide: "The more the therapist is him or herself in the relationship, putting up no professional facade, the greater the likelihood that the client will change and grow in a constructive manner."

Schizophrenic individuals, above all, need contact and reconnection with basic human realities; they need to move beyond the broken-off compulsive fantasizing in which they are caged and return to a sense of their own humanness. Moustakas shares his understanding of such needs for communion:

"Even the person with severe emotional problems does not need (mere) diagnosis and analysis. What he requires is a genuine human experience, meetings with real persons. Then his capacity for living and experiencing may still be able to save him."

The development of trust, of course, requires that the therapist, through voice tone, body language, verbal content, and attention, be able to communicate warmth, acceptance, empathy, firmness, and affirmation of the client's essential self. These must be communicated consistently and at a level the client can experience. Therapists need to take a very active role in initially establishing the relationship itself. This can be facilitated through the therapist's acting as advocate - linking the client with various service providers and coordinating an overall treatment plan. Concrete improvements in the client's life do much to reveal the therapist's caring and commitment to the client.

Keen attunement to the client's mental, emotional, and physical processes is a basic aspect of meeting and gently remaining with the client no matter where he or she is (incoherent, hallucinating, silent, and so on). This focus on the present moment is an essential aspect of psychosynthesis guiding, an aspect which emphasizes the primacy of the guide's immediate attention to the client's process over and above any concept, preconception, or theory he or she may have about the client. This direct attunement can often be sensed by the client and can form a very solid basis for trust.

As the client begins to invest in the therapeutic relationship, there emerges the need to grieve the many losses he or she has almost inevitably suffered (of dreams for oneself, former relationships with healthy friends, and so on). Accompanying this process is the need, as the illness begins to be accepted, of learning to rely on strengths and abilities which are present and to rebuild, when possible, capacities which have been damaged (e.g., logical thinking).

At these stages, psychosynthesis can offer help to the individual therapist. It can be particularly useful, for instance, in designating and mapping in detail the psychological functions - thinking, emotion, intuition, imagination, desire/impulse, and will - which are essentially intact. Thus, a client with a strong intellect, but suffering from delusions or hallucinations, can be addressed on conceptual levels about accomplishing treatment goals.

Alternatively, there are many clients who are deficient intellectually but appear to possess an uncanny, intuitive sense concerning interpersonal interactions and subtleties of feeling in others. This, too, can be affirmed using language and idioms which reach this intuitive sensitivity. Because many mentally ill persons are beset by a plethora of internal imaginings, often connected with strong, even overwhelming affect, the use of visualization and guided imagery is discouraged. However, a therapist's familiarity with metaphoric language can aid him immensely in responding to these essential kinds of communications. Sensitivity to a client's "essential images," then, can further strengthen the bond through which the client will eventually be led out of his or her private inner world into communion with others.

Subpersonality work, a cornerstone of psychosynthesis, can be employed on a simple conversational level, helping clients in perceiving and sorting out the various parts of themselves.

Because such work is concrete and definite in contrast to more general or abstract discussions of thoughts and feelings, clients often have an easier time using it. When basic trust has been established and the client is functioning consistently at predetermined, baseline levels, such work can be gently introduced to receptive clients. In a supportive, caring fashion, client and therapist can then examine together the gamut of subpersonality identifications: the part that "acts out," that withdraws, that is self-hating, that feels anxious and insatiably needy.

Should the client show signs of being upset by this work, either during or following the session, it should cease. When used sparingly, and with discrimination, however, such discussions can add freshness and humor to what, for the client, is the arduous process of reconnecting with himself and the external environment.

In this context, humor itself, when used with compassion and clarity, can have an almost magical effect in strengthening the therapeutic bond; simultaneously, humor aids the client in stepping back and taking less seriously the various attitudes, behaviors, and emotions which are the substance of his or her subpersonality identifications. Such a therapist may be said to be aiding the client toward "dis-identification through conversation." What follows is the next step in aiding a client rebuild and re-identify with a more mature aspect of self, his "own inner nurturing parent" or her "responsible adult part."

Work with the subpersonality known as "the inner critic" can be of particular value to the long-term mentally ill client. Clients face the stigma of mental illness, as well as their own subjectively based difficulties in coping. Shame is very often coupled with blame in the form of pejorative self-judgment. This often is projected onto others with whom the mentally ill individual then struggles. A vicious cycle can be set up whereby professionals place further limits on the diagnosed individual - restricting him to a ward or supervised housing, for example. The client who can get to know and dis-identify from his inner critic gains back much energy and will to use on his journey toward health.

A crucial aspect of psychosynthesis counseling is the therapist's ability to relate to the client as a Self - a center of both awareness and will. The basic understanding one wishes the client to receive is, as Alberti states, "I have an illness, but I am not my illness." This attitude on the part of the therapist consists of relating to the client in the context of his essential nature and his potential for health while acknowledging his current identifications and disabilities. Anne Yeomans describes this attitude in writing about Roberto Assagioli:

"He had the remarkable capacity to read through the layers of self-doubt, of anxiety and tension, of fears and insecurities, of false pride, to reach through these false identifications to the very core of a person - to one's essence - and recognize and greet and affirm it. He seemed to be able to see through the pain and the chaos of those who came to him, to their positive and creative inner core, and say to them both with and without words, 'This is who you are.' We have often said he spoke to the highest in us and we rose to meet him."

This ability is most available to the therapist who has himself learned to disidentify from the various thoughts, emotions, and perceptual vantage points of his own psyche, returning to the observing, willing center, the Self.

Of major help in aiding clients to re-identify with more mature or life-enhancing aspects of themselves is the principle of identification -that is: whatever one gives energy and attention to grows in power and intensity. This is stated as Law Six of Assagioli's Ten Psychological Laws: attention, interest, affirmations, and repetitions reinforce the ideas, images, and psychological formulations on which they are centered.

For many clients, this means moving attention away from images of defeat and substituting in their place a realistic goal they desire to accomplish. One client who had recently found success living in the community after 20 years of hospitalization failed the written permit test necessary for getting his driver's license. All childhood experiences of test taking were failures, except for one incident in grammar school where he had passed a difficult test and had been lauded before the entire class. It was suggested that he concentrate on and recall this memory for five minutes each night, stating to himself the affirmation: "I am going to pass that permit test." Within a month, he passed the test with a perfect score.

In a related context, the psychosynthesis exercise known as "the ideal model" can be adapted for work with this population. The therapist can ask such questions as, "If you were able to nurture and take care of yourself, what would that be like?" The client is then encouraged to flesh out a realistic vision in words, describing the details as carefully as possible. Within attainable limits, the client can be invited to imagine himself possessing an ideal skill or life state. Such a focus of attention when combined with sincere desire can do much, as Hyde states, to "touch the inner core of hopelessness with a firm helping hand." This, Hyde notes, is key for rehabilitation of schizophrenics.

The client's will to grow (or will to health) is a crucial determining factor in successful rehabilitation. Yet, as Peck states, it is a factor not at all understood or even recognized by contemporary psychiatric theory. He notes that it is possible for an individual to be extremely ill, psychiatrically - and yet at the same time possess an extremely strong "will to grow," in which case, some healing will occur. A person who is only mildly ill, on the other hand, but who lacks the will to grow, "will not budge an inch from an unhealthy position."

Hyde has shown that success, even for very ill psychiatric patients, is based mainly on persistence, hard work, and learning to handle setbacks. But, as Alberti asserted, the will to health is intimately connected with the will to meaning - the client's ability to give meaning to the prospect of greater health. Frankl has said that it was this will to meaning which enabled concentration camp victims to survive their horrific conditions. With schizophrenic clients, the therapist often finds the need to appeal to the client's will to meaning, which takes the form of acceptance of life through trust and faith in life itself.

Assagioli was known to speak of the blessing of obstacles, pointing out their function in drawing out latent will and permitting us to develop transpersonal qualities in the struggle to overcome difficulties. From this point of view, the difficulties life presents can be seen as opportunities for growth, and obstacles as challenges or stepping stones. In addition to freeing a vast reserve of will, such a reframed perspective can provide great comfort to the schizophrenic client.

While action in the outer world may follow, there occurs, just as often, a more relaxed acceptance of the realities of one's current existence. As Crampton points out, dealing with an obstacle at times simply means accepting a situation which cannot be changed and learning to develop patience and forbearance. This, too, is an act of will, for as Frankl wrote: "What matters most when one confronts an unavoidable situation is the attitude chosen toward the suffering."

While certain aspects of the will, such as concentration and organization, appear to be seriously damaged by mental illness, these losses are often matched by the strengthening of other qualities in the very act of facing each day amidst psychic pain, confusion, and economic deprivation. These are important assets of which the mentally ill client is often unaware and which frequently go unacknowledged by mental health professionals. The therapist who is alert to the appearance of such strengths should consistently feed this information back to clients, reminding them of their patience, endurance, and courage.

Other aspects of will are often visible in the all- too-common control struggles of mentally ill clients with the mental health professionals in charge of planning and executing their treatment plans. Ineffective and painful past encounters with the mental health system coupled with the client's own urge for self-determination may emerge as sullen stubbornness and willful lack of compliance.

Recent strategic approaches evolved in family therapy offer particularly skillful avenues for respecting the client's need for oppositional stances while using these very positions to serve the client's growth. In individual work, this process can be described as encouraging restraint from change, coupled with the consistent provision of acceptance. Such skillful use of the client's powerful resistance (for example, to a more independent living situation) may be essential for the eventual return of his or her ability to "will positively" later cooperation with treatment plans.

The concept of an ever-present directional process, which presses for realization as the client's next step toward maturity, is the cornerstone of the psychosynthesis approach with schizophrenic individuals. It acts as a basis of faith and conviction, counteracting the fatigue, helplessness, and hopelessness encountered by client, family, and professional alike.

From a psychosynthesis perspective, the action of the professional is that of facilitating this powerful, innate movement toward health. Such an orientation can offset the hazard of current psychiatric diagnoses which, though important for the competent management of medication and treatment, can lead to a cycle of spiraling negative expectations that may induct the patient into a career as "mental patient."

This negative view of what can "reasonably be expected" from the diagnosed person still exerts a strong influence on mental health workers. According to Mosher, it may color their outlook to the extent that clients are related to in terms of conceptions inherent in the diagnosis. For clinicians who operate like this, the patient in effect becomes his or her diagnosis and is related to as a label, a non-person. The inevitable results of this process are frustration, loss of hope, and eventual self-devaluation for client and clinician alike.

Yet, as Hillman has pointed out, while humanistic and existential psychologies have attempted to counterbalance misuses of diagnostic categories, there remains "the very ugliness, misery and madness of psychopathology" with which one must always come to terms, "whitewashing none of its despair." How then can one speak of discovering meaning or facilitating the superconscious in what is after all an agonizing chronic dysfunction?

Of direct relevance to this question is Crampton's statement that the obstacles which confront us "belong to us in a particular way " they have significance and purpose in terms of our own life and each obstacle contains the key to its overcoming." Peck illustrates this process by relating mental illness to the myth of Orestes, who, as punishment from the gods for murder, is plagued by the Furies, an hallucination perceived only by him - a private hell of mental illness. In the end, Orestes, through dint of his own efforts, not only is relieved of the curse - but also transforms the Furies into the Eumenides, loving spirits who through their wise counsel enable Orestes to obtain good fortune.

That psychological suffering can lead to personal and spiritual growth is, of course, not a new concept. Common sense, what Frankl called "the wisdom of the heart," reminds us of the potential of difficult times to bring forth increased sensitivity to others and wise appreciation of life's gifts. In the Alcoholics Anonymous literature, for example, we read:

"Under the lash of alcoholism, we are driven to A.A. " then and only then do we become " as willing to listen as the dying can be."

An anonymously written book for women alcoholics catalogs the emergence of superconscious qualities out of the crucible of pain:

"Suffering softens us, helps us to feel more compassion and love toward one another " our sense of belonging to the human race, our recognition of the interdependence of all are the most cherished results of the gift of pain". Our experiences with all other persons thereafter are deeper " pain offers wisdom. It prepares us to help others whose experiences repeat our own. " pain invites us to rely on many resources, particularly those within " paradoxically these periods strengthen our oneness with the Spirit."

And Levine provides the following observation from his work with the terminally ill and their families:

"Grief, the tearing open of the heart, leaves the heart vulnerable and exposed. And the deep lesson of compassion, for which we were born, becomes evident."

Levine's colleague, Ram Dass, a student of the world's mystic traditions and counselor to many terminally ill persons, places similar thoughts in a theistic context. In writing to the parents of an 11-year-old girl who had been raped and murdered, he said:

"Rachel finished her work on earth, and left the stage in a manner that leaves those of us left behind with a cry of agony in our hearts, as the fragile thread of our faith is dealt with so violently. Is anyone strong enough to stay conscious through such teaching as you are receiving? Probably very few. And even they would only have a whisper of equanimity and peace amidst the screaming trumpets of their rage, grief, horror and desolation.

"I can't assuage your pain with any words, nor should I " not that she or I would inflict such pain, by choice, but there it is. And it must burn its purifying way to completion". For something in you dies when you bear the unbearable. And it is only in that dark night of the soul that you are prepared to see as God sees and to love as God loves."

The stories found daily midst the clients, family, and staff of the clinic I have been discussing are essentially ordinary ones. Yet they suggest the potential of breakdown leading to the breakthrough of transpersonal qualities. The work clients do on themselves is, of necessity, years long and it must be one step at a time, one day at a time.

Acceptance, courage, good will, receptivity, patience, and finally wisdom are the transpersonal qualities which life seems to demand from these individuals as their means to master mental illness. One client simply stated his hope and faith: "For every affliction, something is gained."

Some parents and siblings attested to a richer quality in their lives, a new unexpected dimension, since finding the company of others going through familiar trials. Many have learned about love and joy through realizing their power to contribute to the lives of others. Others are simply learning what it is to be given to, to open to the valuable experience that other parents or siblings have to share.

Parents who years ago would have withdrawn in fear and loathing from the mentally ill now regularly walk through the locked ward, spending time with this patient or that (often each other's children), comfortable in understanding the pain of that patient, as of their own child. Parents who have faced threats or violence from their own children, who have faced grief, rage, helplessness, and despair, become strong indeed.

To have endured loss, to have accepted the unknown, and still to find joy and value in one's own life; to have surmounted shame and humiliation, guilt, and self-blame and to have grown in self-love and self-affirmation; to have faced the darkest abysses of the mind in a son or daughter or in themselves; to have experienced the creative power and resourcefulness of a group of individuals who have joined together to rise above their pain through compassionate action; to experience within oneself clarity and the new ability to create more authentic relationships with others, including one's own family; to realize that far from being victimized by life he or she has been chosen to grow in wisdom and to share this with others coming their way " all these are signs of increased personal and spiritual growth.

Concretely, the parents in the clinic's education group were the originators in 1980 of Alliance for the Mentally Ill, a local self-help group committed to political advocacy and mutual support. Beginning with less than ten members, it has over 125 members and has functioned as a seed organization for inspiring the creation of more than 38 groups as well as a State Alliance.

A core group has written a manual for families who encounter mental illness, and it is now common for family members to lead workshops on mental illness both with or without professional co-leaders. A growing interest of Alliance families is the nutritional and orthomolecular approaches to treating mental illness.

These case examples are manifestations of what Assagioli has called the "will to good," a synthesis of love and will. An aspect of both the personal and transpersonal will, it is best taught by example. Such acts, motivated by compassion, may take on great force, gaining power in a contagious way. Examples of figures who have been known for their influence through the «will to good» are Schweitzer, Martin Luther King, and Gandhi.

The creation of this climate occurred in the aftercare program I have been describing through the combined efforts and inspiration of the clinic staff. According to Crampton, through establishing harmonious and cooperative relationships with others and through aligning with transpersonal qualities within, "the psychic energies of the group tend to combine synergistically or like batteries connected in series to generate more power for the common (endeavor) rather than cancelling each other out through conflict."

For a treatment staff, these conditions are manifested through creativity, expressions of acceptance, caring and acknowledgment, and the open airing of conflicts and differences. The creation and sustaining of this kind of atmosphere is always, of course, imperfect, subject to all the contingencies of any work group - problems with funding, overworked staff, personal disagreements, political differences with other agencies, and so on. But altruistic activities themselves provide deep satisfaction; joining with others in this endeavor (motivated by what psychosynthesis calls "the impulse to serve") creates an atmosphere of good will which is vital and energizing and which can increase in exponential proportions.

It is the impulse to serve - the desire to contribute to the evolution, health, and well-being of others in a meaningful way - that is at the foundation of psychosynthesis. It is, as well, at the basis of the work with the chronically mentally ill I have attempted to illustrate in this piece. When held as a group context in a work setting, it can constitute a powerful antidote to the psychological toxins experienced by the mentally ill and by those who work with them.

It is, as well, a powerful antidote to staff exhaustion, which is a constant hazard in work with highly traumatized, politically powerless individuals. This is primarily so because the «will to good» is the basis for a harmonious, joyful atmosphere. As Gandhi stated so very clearly:

"Such service to others can have no meaning unless one takes pleasure in it". Service which is rendered without joy helps neither the servant nor the served. But all pleasures and possessions pale into nothingness before service which is rendered in a spirit of joy."

Conclusion

This article has attempted a description of the psychosynthesis perspective as applied, both purposefully and instinctively, in a clinic whose mandate was to meet the challenge of mental illness. The success of this program reveals an essential truth: a focus on positive aspects, on the emerging next step, and on the potential capacity and willingness of human beings to aid one another can be the basis for meaning, hope, and growth. This is itself a strong argument for building bridges between professionals and the natural healing networks of the families of the chronically mentally ill. They have many resources waiting to be tapped.

For mental health professionals, psychosynthesis can serve as a means for utilizing, systematically, the powerful healing forces both within and between individuals. This need not be construed as a contradiction of the medical model of psychopathology since chronic mental illness needs to be precisely assessed and treated. It is, however, an invitation to expand the context of treatment such that the psyche in its totality is taken into account, including its innate potential for growth and healing.

For supervisors and participants in milieu treatment centers, the psychosynthesis approach suggests forms of management and cooperation which can bring forth the best in therapeutic staff through establishing relationships which are nourishing to clients and staff members. Such an orientation is a powerful antidote to burn out, which is especially prevalent in the public sector of the human service delivery system. This kind of work group - which is encouraged to get in touch with inner resources, strengths, potentials, and beauty in a setting marked by a high degree of acceptance, genuine concern, and sharing - can liberate healing forces of tremendously powerful dimensions.

References

Alberti, A. (1975). The will in psychotherapy. New York: Psychosynthesis Research Foundation.

Alcoholics Anonymous World Services, Inc. (1953). Twelve steps and twelve traditions. New York.

Anderson, C.M., Hogarty, G.E., & Reiss, D.J. (1980). Family treatment of adult schizophrenic patients: A psychoeducational approach. Schizophrenia Bulletin, 6, 490-505.

Arieti, S. (1979). Understanding and helping the schizophrenic. New York: Basic Books.

Assagioli, R. (1965). Psychosynthesis. New York: Hobbs-Dorman.

Assagioli, R. (1969, spring). Symbols of transpersonal experience. Journal of Transpersonal Psychology.

Bowen, M. (1978). Family therapy in clinical practice. New York: Jason Aronson.

Brown, G. W., Birley, J.L.T., & Wing, J.K. (1972). Influence of family life on the course of schizophrenic disorders, a replication. British Journal of Education, 121, 241-258.

Brown, M. Y. (1982). The Unfolding Self: Psychosynthesis and Counseling. Los Alamos: Intermountain Associates.

Crampton, M. (1974). Psychological energy transformations: Developing positive polarization. Journal of Transpersonal Psychology, 1.

Dincin, J., Selleck, V., & Streiker, S. (1978). Restructuring parental attitudes: Working with parents of the adult mentally ill. Schizophrenia Bulletin, 4, 597-608.

Ferrucci, P. (1982). Los Angeles: Tarcher.

Fischer, L. (Ed.). (1983). The Essential Gandhi. New York: Vantage Books.

Frankl, V. (1969). Man's Search for Meaning. New York: Vantage Books.

Frankl, V. (1975). The Unconscious God. New York: Simon & Schuster.

Friedman, W. (1984). Psychosynthesis, Psychoanalysis, and the Emerging Developmental Perspective in Psychotherapy. In J. Weiser & T. Yeomans (Eds.), Psychosynthesis in the helping professions. Toronto: Department of Applied Psychology, OISE. Guthrie, G. (1973).

Culture and mental disorder. In Module in Anthropology (39). Reading, MA: Addison-Wesley Publishing.

Hazelden Foundation. (1982). Each Day a New Beginning.

Hillman, J. (1975). Re-visioning Psychology. New York: Harper & Row.

Hyde, A.P. (1980). Living with schizophrenia. Chicago: Contemporary Books.

Jaynes, J. (1976). The Origin of Consciousness in the Breakdown of the Bicameral Mind. Boston: Houghton Mifflin.

Laing, R. (1979). Transcendental experience. In D. Goleman & R. Davidson (Eds.), Consciousness: Brain, states of awareness, and mysticism. New York: Harper & Row.

Levine, S. (1982) Who dies? New York: Anchor Books.

Masher, L.R. (1978). Can Diagnosis be Non-pejorative? In L.C. Wynne et al. (Eds.), Schizophrenia. New York: John Wiley.

Moustakas, C. (1967). Creativity and Conformity. New York: D. Van Nostrand. Peck, M.S. (1978).

The Road Less Traveled. (1978). New York: Simon & Schuster.

Palazzoli, M.S., Boscolo, L., Cecchin, G., & Prata, G. (1978). Paradox and Counter-paradox. New York: Jason Aronson.

Torrey, E.F. (1983). Surviving schizophrenia - A Family Manual. New York: Harper & Row.

(Article changed on Nov 20, 2021 at 12:25 AM EST)

 

Rate It | View Ratings

Blair Gelbond Social Media Pages: Facebook page url on login Profile not filled in       Twitter page url on login Profile not filled in       Linkedin page url on login Profile not filled in       Instagram page url on login Profile not filled in

I work as a psychotherapist with an emphasis on transformational learning - a blend of psychoanalytic and transpersonal approaches, and am the author of Self Actualization and Unselfish Love and co-author of Families Helping Families: (more...)
 

Go To Commenting
The views expressed herein are the sole responsibility of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of this website or its editors.
Writers Guidelines
Contact AuthorContact Author Contact EditorContact Editor Author PageView Authors' Articles
Support OpEdNews

OpEdNews depends upon can't survive without your help.

If you value this article and the work of OpEdNews, please either Donate or Purchase a premium membership.

STAY IN THE KNOW
If you've enjoyed this, sign up for our daily or weekly newsletter to get lots of great progressive content.
Daily Weekly     OpEdNews Newsletter
Name
Email
   (Opens new browser window)
 

Most Popular Articles by this Author:     (View All Most Popular Articles by this Author)

Enzo and our Planetary Marathon

Self-Actualization for the Benefit of the World

Loving Awareness

The Scapegoat

Bodhichitta - Opening the Heart-Mind

Are we critical thinkers or "useful idiots?"

Comments Image Post Article Comment and Rate This Article

These discussions are not moderated. We rely on users to police themselves, and flag inappropriate comments and behavior. In accordance with our Guidelines and Policies, we reserve the right to remove any post at any time for any reason, and will restrict access of registered users who repeatedly violate our terms.

  • OpEdNews welcomes lively, CIVIL discourse. Personal attacks and/or hate speech are not tolerated and may result in banning.
  • Comments should relate to the content above. Irrelevant, off-topic comments are a distraction, and will be removed.
  • By submitting this comment, you agree to all OpEdNews rules, guidelines and policies.
          

Comment Here:   


You can enter 2000 characters.
Become a Premium Member Would you like to be able to enter longer comments? You can enter 10,000 characters with Leader Membership. Simply sign up for your Premium Membership and you can say much more. Plus you'll be able to do a lot more, too.

Please login or register. Afterwards, your comment will be published.
 

Username
Password
Show Password

Forgot your password? Click here and we will send an email to the address you used when you registered.
First Name
Last Name

I am at least 16 years of age
(make sure username & password are filled in. Note that username must be an email address.)

2 people are discussing this page, with 10 comments  Post Comment


Blair Gelbond

Become a Fan
Author 71296
(Member since Sep 8, 2011), 7 fans, 66 articles, 1 quicklinks, 2815 comments (How many times has this commenter been recommended?)
Facebook page url on login Profile not filled in Twitter page url on login Profile not filled in Linkedin page url on login Profile not filled in Instagram page url on login Profile not filled in

  New Content

"I began to hold this soul presence as the organizing principle of the lifetime and a force seeking expression through the person from birth to death. From the very beginning in my work with a client I would look for signs of the soul's presence and energies in the midst of the personal content, and for moments it would shine through the suffering and personal concerns that were being presented and worked with.

"Once I had shifted the context, then I could put the soul first in my attention, look for it, and invite its presence into the work. And in the midst of the personal work I could affirm its existence and invoke its wisdom without waiting until the personality was in good enough shape."

Tom Yeomans, student of Roberto Assagioli, founder of Psychosynthesis.

Submitted on Friday, Nov 19, 2021 at 10:20:19 PM

Author 0
Add New Comment
  Recommend  (0+)
Flag This
Share Comment More Sharing          
Commenter Blocking?

Philip Pease

Become a Fan
Author 10841
Follow Me on Twitter
(Member since Feb 8, 2008), 6 fans, 1258 comments, 1 diaries (How many times has this commenter been recommended?)
Not paid member and Facebook page url on login Profile not filled in Not paid member and Twitter page url on login Profile not filled in Not paid member and Linkedin page url on login Profile not filled in Not paid member and Instagram page url on login Profile not filled in

  New Content

I relate to this deeply. This is a model of how to be in this world; to not just survive, but to thrive. I recognize the wisdom that dealing with others with loving awareness benefits all (in this article - the client, the family, and the therapist). At the heart of this is cultivating a way of being that is caring, nurturing, and loving one another.

I have heard people say that we all have a spiritual purpose or mission in life and I wondered how those with severe illness (physical or mental) fit into that belief. In reading this I can see that a person with a sever mental condition offers the opportunity of spiritual growth/transformation to everyone involved. That suffering can bring about love and compassion if we are able to rise above our ego into a state of loving awareness.

I thought I was reading about psychotherapy and schizophrenia; but this is so much more. It is about the human condition and how to change, to grow, to thrive, to transcend. I hope the principles of psychosynthesis don't get lost in the field of psychotherapy.

Submitted on Saturday, Nov 20, 2021 at 8:52:05 AM

Author 0
Add New Comment
  Recommend  (0+)
Flag This
Share Comment More Sharing          
Commenter Blocking?
Indent

Blair Gelbond

Become a Fan
Author 71296
(Member since Sep 8, 2011), 7 fans, 66 articles, 1 quicklinks, 2815 comments (How many times has this commenter been recommended?)
Facebook page url on login Profile not filled in Twitter page url on login Profile not filled in Linkedin page url on login Profile not filled in Instagram page url on login Profile not filled in

Reply to Philip Pease:   New Content

Thank you, Philip,

"Psychosynthesis" today has been folded into the rubric of spiritual psychotherapy, although it still exists as a discrete discipline.

The field as a whole is more open than ever to transpersonal and spiritual concerns. These dimensions have seeped into psychology over the past decades. This includes the area known as "positive psychology."

You are right on target when you say that: "It is about the human condition and how to change, to grow, to thrive, to transcend." Assagioli always said that the principles of psychosynthesis were embedded in the process of life itself.

When it comes to the "purpose" of severe illness, I think of two things: the law of karma, and the opportunity an illness presents to be given to, and for others to do the giving. Also, for the person - the development of qualities like humility, compassion for self and others, and for some people, reliance on a Higher Power.

Submitted on Saturday, Nov 20, 2021 at 12:17:28 PM

Author 0
Add New Comment
  Recommend  (0+)
Flag This
Share Comment More Sharing          
Commenter Blocking?
Indent

Blair Gelbond

Become a Fan
Author 71296
(Member since Sep 8, 2011), 7 fans, 66 articles, 1 quicklinks, 2815 comments (How many times has this commenter been recommended?)
Facebook page url on login Profile not filled in Twitter page url on login Profile not filled in Linkedin page url on login Profile not filled in Instagram page url on login Profile not filled in

Reply to Philip Pease:   New Content

Philip,

In one group I co-led in an outpatient setting, we focused on the 12 Steps of AA,, while applying them to both substance use and mental illness. In simple terms, the group had both psychological and spiritual elements. The room was packed.

Obviously, it is ideal for therapists to be conversant in both these areas.

Submitted on Saturday, Nov 20, 2021 at 12:28:15 PM

Author 0
Add New Comment
  Recommend  (0+)
Flag This
Share Comment More Sharing          
Commenter Blocking?

Blair Gelbond

Become a Fan
Author 71296
(Member since Sep 8, 2011), 7 fans, 66 articles, 1 quicklinks, 2815 comments (How many times has this commenter been recommended?)
Facebook page url on login Profile not filled in Twitter page url on login Profile not filled in Linkedin page url on login Profile not filled in Instagram page url on login Profile not filled in

  New Content

'Psychosis or Spiritual Emergence? - Consideration of the Transpersonal Perspective within Psychiatry'

Dr. Nicki Crowley '

'Fool's gold exists because there is real gold' - Rumi

As we progress into the 21st century, psychiatry is broadening its repertoire to further understand the problem of madness. Psychosis as an altered state of consciousness (ASC) Our deepening understanding of brain, mind and consciousness leaves us no option but to expand the neurobiology of psychosis to incorporate the concept of consciousness; its nature, levels, dimensions and dynamics, and the impact this function plays in the development of challenging, abnormal states of mind.

Psychosis has been defined as 'any one of several altered states of consciousness, transient or persistent, that prevent integration of sensory or extrasensory information into reality models accepted by the broad consensus of society, and that lead to maladaptive behavior and social sanctions.

Psychotic phenomena such as delusions and hallucinations, described and classified in ICD10 and DSM VI , follow clinical observations, which in western society are understood as symptoms of illness. This is based on the assumption that we understand the nature of 'reality', and that there is a narrow band of 'normal' perception, outside of which there is little useful potential. That certain dramatic experiences and unusual states of mind could be more than part of a purely pathological mental state, and hold some potential for personal growth and transformation is the subject of this paper. (con't)

Submitted on Saturday, Nov 20, 2021 at 12:43:16 PM

Author 0
Add New Comment
  Recommend  (0+)
Flag This
Share Comment More Sharing          
Commenter Blocking?

Blair Gelbond

Become a Fan
Author 71296
(Member since Sep 8, 2011), 7 fans, 66 articles, 1 quicklinks, 2815 comments (How many times has this commenter been recommended?)
Facebook page url on login Profile not filled in Twitter page url on login Profile not filled in Linkedin page url on login Profile not filled in Instagram page url on login Profile not filled in

  New Content

(con't)

Spiritual emergency, consciousness and the transpersonal perspective

Observation from many disciplines, including clinical and experimental psychiatry, modern consciousness research, experiential psychotherapies, anthropological field studies, parapsychology, thanatology, comparative religions and mythology have contributed to the concept of 'spiritual emergency' a term that suggests both a crisis and an opportunity of rising to a new level of awareness or 'spiritual emergence.'

This term was first coined by Stan and Christina Grof who founded the Spiritual Emergency Network at the Esalen Institute in 1980. Its remit was to assist individuals and make referrals to therapists for people experiencing psychological difficulties associated with spiritual practices and spontaneous spiritual experiences. Grof describes a spiritual emergency: 'There exist spontaneous non-ordinary states of consciousness, (NOSC) that would in the West be seen and treated as psychosis, and treated mostly by suppressive medication.

But if we use the observations from the study of non-ordinary states, and also from other spiritual traditions, they should really be treated as crises of 1 transformation, or crises of spiritual opening. Something that should really be supported rather than suppressed. If properly understood and properly supported, they are actually conducive to healing and transformation'.

In order for psychiatry to appreciate the relevance of this perspective to the medical diagnosis and treatment of psychosis, it is necessary to move beyond our materialistic, biomechanical focus on brain function and start to expand on the concept of consciousness - that fundamental yet intangible core aspect of 'aliveness', within which is held our perceptual awareness of experience.

Medicine, psychiatry and traditional psychotherapies hold the assumption that consciousness is a by-product (or epiphenomenon) of the brain and cannot persist independently of it (the productive theory of consciousness). The transmissive theory of consciousness holds that consciousness is inherent in the cosmos and is independent of our physical senses, although is mediated by them in everyday life. So the brain and the psyche can be thought of acting as a lens through which consciousness is experienced in the body.

This forms the basis of the transpersonal perspective, which received its initial articulation by thinkers and scholars in the field of psychology, Carl Jung, Robert Assagioli, Ken Wilbur and Stanislav Grof amongst others.

They recognized the limitations of the field of psychology and sought insights and teachings from the spiritual traditions and certain philosophical schools of the east.

The term 'transpersonal' is used here to refer to psychological categories that transcend the normal features of ordinary ego-functioning, that is, stages of psychological growth, or consciousness, that move beyond the rational and precede the mystical. At the root of the transpersonal perspective is the idea that there is a deep level of subjectivity or pure spirit that infuses all matter and every event.

A common metaphor throughout the spiritual wisdom traditions refers to this consciousness, or living spirit, (be it called Brahman, Buddha-Mind, Tao, or The Word) as having been breathed into all being at the moment of creation as a manifestation of divine nature.

It is necessary for sentient life, because experience and awareness are possible only through the activating power that flows from this Source. Transpersonal theory is a way of organizing our experience of 'reality'; it is not that reality itself.

It relies on the phenomenological observations of inner subjective experience and instead of merely pathologizing those which do not fit into expected socio-cultural models, attempts to set them in the context of the wisdom of the world's spiritual traditions (Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, Judaism, Christianity, Islam and the Primal Religions) with some of the philosophical (Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Kant, Kierkegaard) and psychological (Jungian, Humanistic, Existential) schools of the West.

Submitted on Saturday, Nov 20, 2021 at 12:47:39 PM

Author 0
Add New Comment
  Recommend  (0+)
Flag This
Share Comment More Sharing          
Commenter Blocking?

Blair Gelbond

Become a Fan
Author 71296
(Member since Sep 8, 2011), 7 fans, 66 articles, 1 quicklinks, 2815 comments (How many times has this commenter been recommended?)
Facebook page url on login Profile not filled in Twitter page url on login Profile not filled in Linkedin page url on login Profile not filled in Instagram page url on login Profile not filled in

  New Content

How many are diagnosed as being pathologically flawed, when the reality is that higher levels of awareness are descending (breaking through), and in the process, disorganizing the personality? Psychiatry and psychology very much need to expand their purview.

Crowley writes:

Spiritual Emergence and the Transpersonal Levels

Spiritual emergence can be seen as a natural process of human development in which an individual moves beyond normal feelings and desires of the personal ego into the transpersonal realms of increasing relatedness to a Higher Power, or God. It is an acclimatization to more subtle levels of consciousness.

In The Atman Project Ken Wilber has described three levels of transpersonal experience, in ascending order: Subtle, Causal and Atman. At these levels people have access to a fluid creativity from a higher order of inspiration than that of the personality.

The Subtle level is that level of conscious awareness which includes extrasensory perceptions indigenous to the body, as well as those apparently separated from it such as out-of-body experiences and psychokinetic phenomena (objects moving without a physical catalyst.)

The experience of this level is thought to be related to a system of energy centers in the body called chakras in Sanskrit, that are of a more subtle order than physiological organ systems, and subsequently activate a higher order of perception than that possible from our five physical senses. Experiencing awareness of dimensions beyond physical, objectified reality is often the basis for accessing a deeper, revitalized inner meaning of oneness in connection to others.

People have experienced Causal level consciousness as 'peak experiences' secondary to spiritual practice, inspired by music, taking mind-altering substances or following emotional trauma, childbirth or during intense sexual experiences. It is described as a state of perfect ecstasy, untainted by any distracting thoughts, desires or moods.

The Causal level includes the awareness of Subtle and material dimensions, going beyond them to a fuller realization of union with 'God', where there is said to be no sense of time, only eternity. (con't)

Submitted on Saturday, Nov 20, 2021 at 5:15:36 PM

Author 0
Add New Comment
  Recommend  (0+)
Flag This
Share Comment More Sharing          
Commenter Blocking?

Blair Gelbond

Become a Fan
Author 71296
(Member since Sep 8, 2011), 7 fans, 66 articles, 1 quicklinks, 2815 comments (How many times has this commenter been recommended?)
Facebook page url on login Profile not filled in Twitter page url on login Profile not filled in Linkedin page url on login Profile not filled in Instagram page url on login Profile not filled in

  New Content

(con't)

(Note: It is extremely helpful for anyone experiencing these higher states of consciousness to have first developed a relatively solid sense of (conventional) self or ego. As one person put it, 'You have to become somebody, before you can be nobody.'

Still, even those with a healthy ego can be initially overwhelmed by this influx of energy and awareness. The fact that the society does not yet recognize these levels as valid and a natural part of the human growth process does not help. - B.G.)

The Atman level is beyond the Causal, but including all dimensions below it. This dimension of consciousness is said to be so completely immersed in the Highest Power that nothing else exists in awareness. It is described as bringing perfect ecstasy beyond emotion. Indications of the Atman level exist in mystical religious texts where it is referred to as being beyond description.

Experience of these transpersonal realms does not necessarily precipitate a crisis. These intense intra-psychic experiences can phenomenologically appear similar to pathological psychotic states, but given the appropriate context, sensitive guidance, and opportunity to integrate the experience, individuals can reach higher levels of awareness and functioning following such an experience.

This transpersonal perspective affords us an opportunity to build a modern scientific theory of 'madness' around a radically expanded view of consciousness, and allows us to differentiate extraordinary states of consciousness that are more adaptive than the ordinary state, from alterations that restrict one's ability to function in the world.

Submitted on Saturday, Nov 20, 2021 at 5:24:16 PM

Author 0
Add New Comment
  Recommend  (0+)
Flag This
Share Comment More Sharing          
Commenter Blocking?

Blair Gelbond

Become a Fan
Author 71296
(Member since Sep 8, 2011), 7 fans, 66 articles, 1 quicklinks, 2815 comments (How many times has this commenter been recommended?)
Facebook page url on login Profile not filled in Twitter page url on login Profile not filled in Linkedin page url on login Profile not filled in Instagram page url on login Profile not filled in

  New Content

As a therapist, I found seeing my client as a soul to be a very potent intervention. This entailed seeing the non-physical light of the soul, which many mystical traditions have called, the "spark of God" within the personality and body.

With families, other clinicians, the society, and the individual themselves all relating to the client as a "schizophrenic," my nonverbally communicating that the client's core is sacred was - if there was any receptivity at all - sensed as a blessed relief. It often created an openness which enabled the client to get on with the personal work on themselves that I was there to facilitate.

Submitted on Sunday, Nov 21, 2021 at 3:07:43 PM

Author 0
Add New Comment
  Recommend  (0+)
Flag This
Share Comment More Sharing          
Commenter Blocking?

Blair Gelbond

Become a Fan
Author 71296
(Member since Sep 8, 2011), 7 fans, 66 articles, 1 quicklinks, 2815 comments (How many times has this commenter been recommended?)
Facebook page url on login Profile not filled in Twitter page url on login Profile not filled in Linkedin page url on login Profile not filled in Instagram page url on login Profile not filled in

  New Content

In doing therapy - with people with schizophrenia or any other population - it is possible to perceive multiple layers of Self. If the therapist has worked on opening their own being, they may perceive or intuit The Supreme Self: "God," if you will, - or they may not.

Next, they may perceive or intuit the soul. The relationship of the Absolute ("God") to the "transpersonal self" (or soul) is like that of mother and child. The soul is said to be a source of power, love, truth, and meaning within us, through which we are capable of both being fully ourselves and being in harmonious and right relationship with all other beings. It is a lived reality, that is both unique and universal, that aids us in expressing our gifts to the world, and which enables us to both give and receive love.

Next, is the personality and the body, which are obviously visible, and for which the client is hoping to receive help.

Holding the context that the client has within them depths upon depths can create a spacious, even liberating context for the client/therapist relationship, and the "body and fender work" they will do together.

Submitted on Tuesday, Nov 23, 2021 at 5:59:00 PM

Author 0
Add New Comment
  Recommend  (0+)
Flag This
Share Comment More Sharing          
Commenter Blocking?

 
Want to post your own comment on this Article? Post Comment