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General News    H3'ed 9/20/21

Tomgram: William Astore, A Bright Future for Weapons and War

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This article originally appeared at TomDispatch.com. To receive TomDispatch in your inbox three times a week, click here.

There are always winners and losers, aren't there? For instance, the seven children who died in that last drone strike the U.S. military launched in Kabul as it was leaving town were certainly losers. Those who ordered that strike against an ISIS-K suicide bomber who wasn't there" well, no, not actually.

Let's face it. If the history of twenty-first-century America tells us anything, it's that you just can't lose when you're part of the military-industrial complex, not in this country, no matter what happens on any battlefield. If you don't believe me, just consider this: at the very moment the U.S. military chaotically prepared to leave Kabul and head for home in apparent defeat, the relevant Senate and House committees, Democrats and Republicans alike, agreed to add another $24 billion to the already staggering $715 billion the Biden administration had requested for the Pentagon's fiscal year 2022 budget. The Forever Wars over? Not in funding terms, that's for sure.

Admittedly, these years were a nightmare, as civilians in distant lands were killed or displaced from their homes in staggering numbers; torture became the norm in America's ill-named "war on terror"; and that prison in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, offshore of American justice, never stopped operating. Honestly, what we've been through these last 20 years should have been called the war not on but for terror or perhaps for the spread of terror (since there are now far more Islamist terror groups on this planet than on September 11, 2001).

Meanwhile, America's losing commanders, who led that 20-year war in Afghanistan and should have been fired en masse, are now largely blaming the politicians for what happened. No wonder TomDispatch regular William Astore, a retired Air Force lieutenant colonel and historian who runs the Bracing Views blog, takes a dim view (or is it a nuclear-bright view) of where this country is heading militarily in the post-Afghan War era. Tom

The U.S. Military, Post-Afghanistan
Can We Finally Give Peace A Chance?

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Yoda, the Jedi Master in the Star Wars films, once pointed out that the future is all too difficult to see and it's hard to deny his insight. Yet I'd argue that, when it comes to the U.S. military and its wars, Yoda was just plain wrong. That part of the future is all too easy to imagine. It involves, you won't be shocked to know, more budget-busting weaponry for the Pentagon and more military meddling across the globe, perhaps this time against "near-peer" rivals China and Russia, and a global war on terror that will never end. What's even easier to see is that peace will be given no chance at all. Why? Because it's just not in the interests of America's deeply influential military-congressional-industrial complex.

When that vast complex, which President Dwight Eisenhower warned us about six decades ago, comes to my mind, I can't help thinking of a song from the last years of the then seemingly endless Cold War. (How typical, by the way, that when the Soviet Union finally imploded in 1991, it barely affected Pentagon funding.)

"The future's so bright (I gotta wear shades)" was that 1986 song's title. And I always wonder whether that future could indeed be nuclear-war bright, given our military's affection for such weaponry. I once heard the saying, "The [nuclear] triad is not the Trinity," which resonated with me given my Catholic upbringing. Still, it's apparently holy enough at the Pentagon or why would the high command there already be planning to fund the so-called modernization of the American nuclear arsenal to the tune of at least $1.7 trillion over the next 30 years? Given this nation's actual needs, that figure blows me away (though not literally, I hope).

What is that "triad" the complex treats as a holy trinity? It consists of land-based intercontinental ballistic missiles, or ICBMs; nuclear-weapons-capable bombers like the B-1, B-2, and the venerable B-52; and submarine-launched ballistic missiles, or SLBMs. Given our present vast nuclear arsenal, there's no strategic need for building new ICBMs at a price beyond compare. In fact, as the most vulnerable "leg" of the triad, the ones the Air Force currently has should be decommissioned.

Nor is there a strategic need for an ultra-expensive new bomber like the Air Force's proposed B-21 Raider (basically, an updated version of the B-2 Spirit "stealth" bomber that's most frequently used these days for flyovers at big college and Super Bowl football games). America's Ohio-class nuclear submarines that still wander the world's oceans armed with Trident missiles are more than capable of "deterring" any conceivable opponent into the distant future, even if they also offer humanity a solid shot at wholesale suicide via a future nuclear winter. But reason not the need, as Shakespeare once had King Lear say. Focus instead on the profits to be made (he might have added, had he lived in our time and our land) by building "modernized" nukes.

As my old service, the Air Force, clamors for new nuclear missiles and bombers, there's also the persistent quest for yet more fighter jets, including overpriced, distinctly underperforming ones like the F-35, the "Ferrari" of fighter planes according to the Air Force chief of staff. If the military gets all the F-35s it wants, add another $1.7 trillion to the cost of national "defense." At the same time, that service is seeking a new, "lower-cost" (but don't count on it) multirole fighter what the F-35 was supposed to be once upon a time even as it pursues the idea of a "6th-generation" fighter even more advanced (read: pricier) than 5th-generation models like the F-22 and F-35.

I could go on similarly about the Navy (more Ford-class aircraft carriers and new nuclear-armed submarines) or the Army (modernized Abrams tanks; a new infantry fighting vehicle), but you get the idea. If Congress and the president keep shoveling trillions of dollars down the military's gullet and those of its camp followers (otherwise known as "defense" contractors), count on one thing: they'll find ever newer ways of spending that dough on anything from space weaponry to robot "companions."

Indeed, I asked a friend who's still intimate with the military-industrial complex what's up with its dreams and schemes. The military's latest Joint Warfighting Concept, he told me, "is all about building Systems of Systems based in AI [artificial intelligence] and quantum computing." Then he added: "All it will do is give us more sophisticated ways to lose wars." (You can see why he's my friend.) The point is that AI and quantum computing sound futuristically super-sexy, which is why they'll doubtless be used to justify super-expensive future budgetary requests by the Pentagon.

In that context, don't you find it staggering how much the military spent in Afghanistan fighting and losing all too modernistically to small, under-armed units of the Taliban? Two trillion-plus dollars to wage a counterinsurgency campaign that failed dismally. Imagine if, in the next decade or two, the U.S. truly had to fight a near-peer rival like China. Even if the U.S. military somehow won the battles, this nation would undoubtedly collapse into bankruptcy and financial ruin (and it would be a catastrophe for the whole endangered planet of ours). It could get so bad that even Jeff Bezos and Elon Musk might have to pay higher taxes, if, that is, they haven't already slipped the surly bonds of Earth to mingle with the twinkling stars.

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Tom Engelhardt, who runs the Nation Institute's Tomdispatch.com ("a regular antidote to the mainstream media"), is the co-founder of the American Empire Project and, most recently, the author of Mission Unaccomplished: Tomdispatch (more...)
 

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