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Tomgram: Engelhardt, General Petraeus's Two Campaigns

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This story originally appeared at TomDispatch.com.

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[Note for TomDispatch Readers:  Last Saturday, Chalmers Johnson died.  I'm particularly proud that, in his last years, he did much of his most penetrating analysis of American militarism and our war state for this website.  He penned his first piece for TomDispatch, "Assassins R Us," in November 2003, called for abolishing the CIA here in November 2004, described how the Bush administration's invasion of Iraq had opened the way for the looting of that country's (and so the human) patrimony in "The Smash of Civilizations" in July 2005, and so on, up to August of this year when his final piece, "Portrait of a Sagging Empire," appeared.  (Because I knew by then that he would never write again, I introduced that piece with a little stroll of my own down memory lane -- the story of how I came to edit and publish his book  Blowback .)  A striking selection of the best of his recent TomDispatch pieces (as well as others) can be found in his final remarkable book, Dismantling the Empire: America's Last Best Hope.  The TD search window works well if you want to explore the work of one of the great critical thinkers of our post-9/11 world.  He's gone, but his books will outlive us all.  This site will not post again until the Monday after Thanksgiving.  I'll be traveling and, much as I do try, I may be worse than usual at answering emails.  Tom]

How to Schedule a War 
The Incredible Shrinking Withdrawal Date 

By Tom Engelhardt

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Going, going, gone!  You can almost hear the announcer's voice throbbing with excitement, only we're not talking about home runs here, but about the disappearing date on which, for the United States and its military, the Afghan War will officially end.

Practically speaking, the answer to when it will be over is: just this side of never.  If you take the word of our Afghan War commander, the secretary of defense, and top officials of the Obama administration and NATO, we're not leaving any time soon.  As with any clever time traveler, every date that's set always contains a verbal escape hatch into the future.

In my 1950s childhood, there was a cheesy (if thrilling) sci-fi flick, The Incredible Shrinking Man, about a fellow who passed through a radioactive cloud in the Pacific Ocean and soon noticed that his suits were too big for him.  Next thing you knew, he was living in a doll house, holding off his pet cat, and fighting an ordinary spider transformed into a monster.  Finally, he disappeared entirely leaving behind only a sonorous voice to tell us that he had entered a universe where "the unbelievably small and the unbelievably vast eventually meet, like the closing of a gigantic circle."

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In recent weeks, without a radioactive cloud in sight, the date for serious drawdowns of American troops in Afghanistan has followed a similar path toward the vanishing point and is now threatening to disappear "over the horizon" (a place where, we are regularly told, American troops will lurk once they have finally handed their duties over to the Afghan forces they are training).

If you remember, back in December 2009 President Obama spoke of July 2011 as a firm date to "begin the transfer of our forces out of Afghanistan," the moment assumedly when the beginning of the end of the war would come into sight.  In July of this year, Afghan President Hamid Karzai spoke of 2014 as the date when Afghan security forces "will be responsible for all military and law enforcement operations throughout our country."

Administration officials, anxious about the effect that 2011 date was having on an American public grown weary of an unpopular war and on an enemy waiting for us to depart, grabbed Karzai's date and ran with it (leaving many of his caveats about the war the Americans were fighting, particularly his desire to reduce the American presence, in the dust).  Now, 2014 is hyped as the new 2011.

It has, in fact, been widely reported that Obama officials have been working in concert to "play down" the president's 2011 date, while refocusing attention on 2014. In recent weeks, top administration officials have been little short of voluble on the subject.  Secretary of Defense Robert Gates ("We're not getting out. We're talking about probably a years-long process."), Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, and Chairman of the Joint Chiefs Admiral Mike Mullen, attending a security conference in Australia, all "cited 2014... as the key date for handing over the defense of Afghanistan to the Afghans themselves."  The New York Times headlined its report on the suddenly prominent change in timing this way: "U.S. Tweaks Message on Troops in Afghanistan."

Quite a tweak.  Added Times reporter Elisabeth Bumiller: "The message shift is effectively a victory for the military, which has long said the July 2011 deadline undermined its mission by making Afghans reluctant to work with troops perceived to be leaving shortly." 

Inflection Points and Aspirational Goals

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Barely had 2014 risen into the headlines, however, before that date, too, began to be chipped away.  As a start, it turned out that American planners weren't talking about just any old day in 2014, but its last one.  As Lieutenant General William Caldwell, head of the NATO training program for Afghan security forces, put it while holding a Q&A with a group of bloggers, "They're talking about December 31st, 2014.  It's the end of December in 2014... that [Afghan] President Karzai has said they want Afghan security forces in the lead."

Nor, officials rushed to say, was anyone talking about 2014 as a date for all American troops to head for the exits, just "combat troops" -- and maybe not even all of them.  Possibly tens of thousands of trainers and other so-called non-combat forces would stay on to help with the "transition process." This follows the Iraq pattern where 50,000 American troops remain after the departure of U.S. "combat" forces to great media fanfare.  Richard Holbrooke, Obama's Special Representative for Afghanistan and Pakistan, was typical in calling for "the substantial combat forces [to] be phased out at the end of 2014, four years from now."  (Note the usual verbal escape hatch, in this case "substantial," lurking in his statement.)

Last Saturday, behind "closed doors" at a NATO summit in Lisbon, Portugal, Afghan War commander General David Petraeus presented European leaders with a "phased four-year plan" to "wind down American and allied fighting in Afghanistan." Not surprisingly, it had the end of 2014 in its sights and the president quickly confirmed that "transition" date, even while opening plenty of post-2014 wiggle room.  By then, as he described it, "our footprint" would only be "significantly reduced." (He also claimed that, post-2014, the U.S. would be maintaining a "counterterrorism capability" in Afghanistan -- and Iraq -- for which "platforms to... execute... counterterrorism operations," assumedly bases, would be needed.)

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Tom Engelhardt, who runs the Nation Institute's Tomdispatch.com ("a regular antidote to the mainstream media"), is the co-founder of the American Empire Project and, most recently, the author of Mission Unaccomplished: Tomdispatch (more...)
 

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