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OpEdNews Op Eds    H3'ed 10/30/17

Positive Vibes for Negative Times

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As it is, today it is sometimes unbelievably depressing and infuriating to reflect upon the "carnage and cacophony" in which we are seemingly enmeshed. And writing about it? Everyone is writing about it. Social media is awash in it. Yes, actual factual information is vital, but that steady drumbeat of ignorance and arrogance at the center of most news stories today only seems to add to the great wall of negative energy engulfing our universal consciousness, making us act, if you will, as if we were all collectively unconscious.

Thank you, Carl Jung, for allowing me to misappropriate and mangle your theory for my own personal benefit. In my defense, my hope is that whatever bits of positive energy I can contribute to the greater consciousness can only be for the good of the collective universe.

So, here goes:

  • I'm getting a 2 percent raise in my Social Security check next year. That's good news not only for me, but for millions of others who receive monthly checks (thank you, FDR) and who have not had a raise since 2012 because the government figured inflation wasn't bad enough and the cost of living wasn't going up so's you'd notice. Some of us noticed. I could feel the vibe of 66 million recipients ripple across America when I read the story. It's the first substantial raise in years. Most recipients are seniors over age 65, but some payments also go to the severely disabled and orphans. The average check is currently $1,377 a month, meaning next year's increase will raise the typical payment by $27 a month. Listen, it's a start.
  • We also learned that, despite the devastation Hurricane Maria visited on Puerto Rico, the Arecibo Observatory, made famous in the films "Contact" (Jodie Foster) and "GoldenEye" (Sean Connery), survived with what was called "fixable" damage and no casualties. This is positive news because Arecibo is a star in the search-for-life-in-the-universe universe. The radio telescope, built in 1963, was the first to find planets around other stars, the first to provide an image of an asteroid and -- back to Carl Sagan's "Contact" -- sent the famous Arecibo Message to M13, a cluster of bodies 25,000 light years away. The message informs any sentient beings who receive it who we are and where we live. Send us a text message. Of course, it'll be at least 50,000 years before we get an answer, but it's the sending that contributes hope to the universal consciousness. Arecibo's radar has been called "by far the most sensitive planetary radar in the world" and the folks who fund it -- the National Science Foundation -- say it does "excellent science." Alas, in this era of anti-science, an official at NSF says, what with the damage Arecibo did incur, "If you look at the overall sweep of things that we're funding, we do have to make choices and we can't keep funding everything that's excellent." Perish the thought. So, here's looking at you, Arecibo, and here's sending some positive vibes about you into the nearby universe.
  • Staying in Puerto Rico and the notion of doing what you can for the collective good, Elon Musk, CEO of Tesla, an alternative energy company, made the initial installment of his promise to restore the island's power grid with solar energy. San Juan's Hospital del Niño -- a children's hospital with 3,000 patients -- has power again, supplied by a collection of Tesla solar panels in the parking lot. The Tesla Twitter account posted: "Hospital del Niño is first of many solar-storage projects going live. Grateful to support the recovery of Puerto Rico with (Gov.) Ricardo Rossello." All kinds of positive energy here. Musk, of course, is also the one talking about establishing a colony on Mars and who's willing to bet against him?
  • In an extraordinary example of quantum positive energy, a hand-written note by Albert Einstein sold at auction in Jerusalem for $1.56 million. The note was written in November 1922, when Einstein, then 43, was in Japan for a lecture series. While in Tokyo, he learned he'd been awarded the Nobel Prize in physics. When a courier came to his hotel room to make a delivery, Einstein did not have any money to tip him, so he handed the messenger a signed note, written in German: "A calm and humble life will bring more happiness than the pursuit of success and the constant restlessness that comes with it." A kind of e=mc2 for a peaceful universe. The message was obviously paid forward several times before someone realized what Einstein clearly knew at the time -- a bird in the hand (a signed note from a Nobel laureate, say) is worth two (or even more) in the bush.
  • Chris Long, who plays defensive end for the NFL's Philadelphia Eagles, is donating his entire year's salary to improve educational opportunities in the United States. Long used his first six game checks to provide two scholarships for students in Charlottesville, Va., his hometown. He's dedicating the remaining 10 to launch the "Pledge 10 for Tomorrow" campaign. "I believe that education is the best gateway to a better tomorrow for EVERYONE in America," he wrote on Pledge It. "I'm encouraging fans, businesses and every person with a desire to join in my pursuit of equal education opportunities for all students to make their own pledge.' He hopes to double his pledge with this collective effort.
  • In a somewhat desperate effort to find some positive news, I typed "good news" in the Google search bar. Voila! The web is awash in other folks looking to add positive energy to the collective consciousness. Duh. Some of the above came from that search. It's good to remember: We are not alone, even in the private universe of our anxious minds.
  • Speaking of synchronicity, hurry it up, Mueller.

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Bob Gaydos is a veteran of 40-plus years in daily newspapers. He began as police reporter with The (Binghamton, N.Y.) Sun-Bulletin, eventually covering government and politics as well as serving as city editor, features editor, sports editor and (more...)
 

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