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General News    H4'ed 6/3/10

Tracking the American Epidemic of Mental Illness - Part II

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Message Evelyn Pringle
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Tax dollars are being used to fuel the American epidemic of mental illness by promoting the preemptive drugging of persons supposedly at risk of developing mental disorders, to the great benefit of the pharmaceutical industry.


In March 2010, the US Department of Health & Human Services Substance Abuse & Mental Health Service Administration Center for Mental Health Services announced $16.5 million in funding for "Mental Health Transformation Grants," one of SAMHSA's services grant programs.

An evidence-based practice, or EBP, refers to approaches to prevention or treatment that are validated by some form of documented research evidence. As an example of a practice that could be implemented, SAMHSA listed under "Prevention and Wellness: Early Intervention," the "Early Detection and Intervention for the Prevention of Psychosis Program (EDIPPP)," along with a link to its website http://www.changemymind.org/.

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EDIPPP is a national program replicating the "Portland Identification and Early Referral," or "PIER," a treatment research program at the Main Medical Center, in Portland, Maine.

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On a webpage for PIER on the Center's Website, under "Project Overview," it states: "The goals are to improve outcomes and prevent the onset of the psychotic phase of illnesses like Bipolar Disorder, Major Depression, and Schizophrenia."


"This is the first program in the United States to identify the entire population of at risk young persons and offer them treatment," PIER said in a September 26, 2005 press release.


EDIPPP was funded through a $14.4 million million grant for the "National Demonstration of Early Detection, Intervention and Prevention of Psychosis in Adolescents and Young Adults," from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and is "designed to prevent psychosis in teens and young adults," according to an April 10, 2007, announcement on RWJF's launch of the program.

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"The national program is expanding PIER's success during the past seven years in identifying and treating young people experiencing subtle and early symptoms that herald the onset of serious mental illness," a November 2007 report in Behavioral Healthcare, by Dr James Maier, a research psychiatrist with PIER, notes.



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Evelyn Pringle is an investigative journalist and researcher focused on exposing corruption in government and corporate America.
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