Send a Tweet
Most Popular Choices



    Message Border Jumpers
SHARE More Sharing

Border Jumpers  (# of views)

Facebook page url on login Profile not filled in       Twitter page url on login Profile not filled in       Linkedin page url on login Profile not filled in       Instagram page url on login Profile not filled in

                 

Volunteer a little time and make a big difference

I have 1 fans:
Become a Fan
Become a Fan.
You'll get emails whenever I post articles on OpEdNews

BorderJumpers.org began in October 2009 in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia -- when Bernard Pollack and Danielle Nierenberg began a journey to visit nearly every country in Africa. At every stop they are meeting with farmers, community organizers, labor activists/leaders, non-governmental organization (NGOs), the funding and donor communities, and local, regional, and international press.

With a Sony handycam, a 8-year old laptop, and sporadic internet connections â€" their goal is to bring stories of hope from across the region to as large an audience as possible. They will tell the stories that aren't being told--from oil workers fighting to have a union in Nigeria to innovative ways farmers and pastoralists are coping with climate change.

OpEdNews Member for 511 week(s) and 6 day(s)

49 Articles, 0 Quick Links, 0 Comments, 9 Diaries, 0 Polls

Articles Listed By Date   List By Popularity
Search Title           
Date Between and

Page 1 of 3    First  Last   Back  Next  2  3     View All

SHARE More Sharing        Monday, July 19, 2010
Fighting for Farmworkers' Rights for More Than 40 Years This is the first of three parts of an interview with Baldemar Velasquez, President and Founder of the Farm Labor Organizing Committee. In Part One, Mr. Velasquez describes the biggest challenges and abuses farm workers face in the U.S., and what it was like for his family to work in America's agricultural sector. Cross posted from Worldwatch Institute's Nourishing the Planet.
SHARE More Sharing        Friday, July 16, 2010
A Conversation About Organic Agriculture with Chuck Benbrook In this regular series we profile advisors of the Nourishing the Planet project. This week, we feature Chuck Benbrook, Chief Scientist at the Organic Center.
SHARE More Sharing        Wednesday, July 14, 2010
Beating the Heat to Reduce Post-Harvest Waste For a farmer in a hot country like Sudan, a big harvest can end up being just a big waste. A fresh tomato off the vine will only last about 2 days in the stifling heat, while carrots and okra might last only 4 days. Despite being perfectly capable of producing abundant harvests, without any means to store and preserve crops, farmers in Sudan are at risk for hunger and starvation.
SHARE More Sharing        Monday, July 12, 2010
Turning the Catch of the Day into Improved Livelihoods for the Whole Community Leaving Gambia's capital city, Banjul, you'll find a group of women standing road side offering up oysters for 15 dalasis a cup, or about 55 cents for approximately 75 pieces of oyster meat. These women in the community have been harvesting oysters from the extensive mangrove wetlands of Gambia for decades. Much of the harvesting is concentrated in Tanbi National Park, a Ramsar site, or wetland of international importance.
(1 comments) SHARE More Sharing        Saturday, July 10, 2010
Creating Food Sovereignty for Small-Scale Farmers This interview with Raj Patel, award-winning writer, activist and academic, was originally featured as a two part series on Nourishing the Planet.
SHARE More Sharing        Saturday, July 3, 2010
Depending on A Global Workforce This is the second and third parts in a series of blogs Nourishing the Planet will be writing about workers in the food system. Nourishing the Planet research intern Ronit Ridberg recently spoke with Erik Nicholson, National VP of the United Farm Workers of America. In the first part of this two-part interview, Erik talks about the global agricultural system and the role American consumers play in it.
SHARE More Sharing        Thursday, July 1, 2010
Locally Produced Crops for Locally Consumed Products In Zambia, sorghum-a drought resistant cereal that thrives in the country- was considered a "poor man's crop" in the past, often shunned by small-scale farmers for the more commercially viable maize. But an article in the June issue of Farming Matters explains how a Zambian brewery with a new brand of beer is changing the way small-scale farmers think about sorghum.
SHARE More Sharing        Tuesday, June 29, 2010
Learning to Listen to Farmers At the Department of Agricultural Economics and Extension at Cape Coast University in Southern Ghana, learning takes place not only in classrooms, but also literally in fields and farms all over the country. As part of a program to improve agricultural extension services, extension officers are working with professors to find ways to improve food production in their communities.
SHARE More Sharing        Wednesday, June 23, 2010
Using Digital Technology to Empower and Connect Young Farmers At the Rural Development Foundation's (RDF) primary school in Kalleda, a small village in the Warangal district of Andhra Pradesh, India, students carry gardening tools, along with their notebooks and pencils.
SHARE More Sharing        Tuesday, June 22, 2010
New Frontier Farmers and Processor Group: Reviving Farmland and Improving Livelihoods This is the seventh piece in an eight part series about the Ecumenical Association for Sustainable Agriculture and Rural Development's (ECASARD) work in Ghana. Cross posted from Worldwatch Institute's Nourishing the Planet.
SHARE More Sharing        Thursday, June 17, 2010
Nourishing the Planet in USA Today: In a world of abundance, food waste is a crime Check out the op-ed on preventing food waste that Nourishing the Planet has in this mornings USA Today. We describe how both the United States and sub-Saharan Africa waste enormous amounts of food.
SHARE More Sharing        Monday, June 14, 2010
Making a Living Out of Conservation The farmers of the Neleshi Grasscutter and Farmers Association (NAGRAFA) consider themselves not only farmers and businesswomen and men, but also conservationists. Grasscutters, or cane rats, are found throughout Western Africa and, as their name suggests, they live in grasslands. But many poor farmers in Ghana use slash and burn methods on grasslands to provide short term nutrients to the soil.
SHARE More Sharing        Thursday, June 10, 2010
Traditional Food Crops Provide Community Resilience in Face of Climate Change Thanks to Dr. Soul Shava, Training Manager at the Aurecon Training Academy, in Pretoria, South Africa for sharing a recent study, by researchers from Rhodes and Cornell Universities and the Sebakwe Black Rhino Conservation Trust, on indigenous crops with the Nourishing the Planet project.
From ImagesAttr
SHARE More Sharing        Wednesday, June 9, 2010
The Abooman Women's Group: Working Together to Improve Livelihoods This is the fourth in a five-part series of Danielle Nierenberg's visit with the Ecumenical Association for Sustainable Agriculture and Rural Development and the projects they support in southern Ghana.Cross posted from Worldwatch Institute's Nourishing the Planet.
From ImagesAttr
SHARE More Sharing        Monday, June 7, 2010
With ECASARD You Can See A Real Impact This is two parts from a five-part series of our visit with the Ecumenical Association for Sustainable Agriculture and Rural Development and the projects they support in southern Ghana. Cross posted from Worldwatch Institute's Nourishing the Planet.
From ImagesAttr
SHARE More Sharing        Sunday, June 6, 2010
54 Tips on Things You Must Do While in South Africa for the World Cup Hundreds of thousands of people from across the world are headed to South Africa to watch the World Cup, descending on Johannesburg, Cape Town, Durban, and six other cities across the country for the biggest sporting event the continent has ever seen.
SHARE More Sharing        Sunday, June 6, 2010
It's All About the Process Zambian grocery stores are filled with processed foods from around the world, from crackers made in Argentina and soy milk from China to popular U.S. breakfast cereals. In addition to these foreign foods, however, are also variety of locally made and processed products, including indigenous varieties of organic rice, all-natural peanut butter and honey from the It's Wild brand.
SHARE More Sharing        Friday, June 4, 2010
Working with the Root The Ecumenical Association for Sustainable Agriculture and Rural Development (ECASARD), based in Accra, Ghana, is a unique organization. Not only has it brought together members of the Christian and Muslim faith-based communities to help improve the lives of farmers, it also collaborates with farmers groups, NGOs, policy-makers, and research institutions.
SHARE More Sharing        Tuesday, June 1, 2010
Using Livestock to Rebuild and Preserve Communities For pastoralist communities like the well-known Maasai in Kenya, livestock keeping is more than just an important source of food and income; it's a way of life that has been a part of their culture and traditions for hundreds of years.
SHARE More Sharing        Saturday, May 29, 2010
John Jeavons and Jake Blehm on Building a Truly Sustainable Agriculture In this regular series we profile advisors of the Nourishing the Planet project. This week, we feature John Jeavons, Executive Director of Ecology Action and Jake Blehm, Assistant Executive Director at Ecology Action in Willits, California. Cross posted from Border Jumpers, Danielle Nierenberg and Bernard Pollack.

Page 1 of 3    First  Last   Back  Next  2  3     View All