Send a Tweet
Most Popular Choices
Become a Premium Member Would you like to know how many people have visited this page? Or how reputable the author is? Simply sign up for a Advocate premium membership and you'll automatically see this data on every article. Plus a lot more, too.



SHARE More Sharing

GL Rowsey

Facebook page url on login Profile not filled in       Twitter page url on login Profile not filled in       Linkedin page url on login Profile not filled in       Instagram page url on login Profile not filled in

                 

Volunteer a little time and make a big difference

Become a Fan
Become a Fan.
You'll get emails whenever I post articles on OpEdNews

"How could I fail to speak with difficulty? I have new things to say."

I graduated from Stanford Law School in 1966 but have never practiced. Instead, I dropped back five years and joined The Movement, but it wasn't until the 1970's that I began writing serious prose. By 1978, I was too old to live on the streets and sweat out going to jail, so I got a serious job as a GS-4, clerk-typist with the US Forest Service. I retired 23 years later, as head of the regionwide Claims Program in the California Region, headquartered in San Francisco for 20 years and then moved to Mare Island, in Vallejo. (That early school training always catches up with us, sooner or later.)

I still live in the greater Vallejo area, and I still have radical politics. Last year my major project was contributing to the ending of the Iraq war, with a minor in ending the embargo of Cuba. This year, I'm a little confused, but what the hey, who's not?

OpEdNews Member for 662 week(s) and 6 day(s)

24 Articles, 19 Quick Links, 427 Comments, 16 Diaries, 0 Polls

Articles Listed By Date   List By Popularity
Search Title           
Date Between and

Page 1 of 2    First  Last   Back  Next  2     View All

From ImagesAttr
(2 comments) SHARE More Sharing        Tuesday, August 18, 2009
American Apartheid: Segregation and the Making of the Underclass, by Douglas Massey and Nancy Denton (1998)* This book is more painful to read than Eichmann in Jerusalem, Germinal, or the pornographic The Rehnquist Choice by John Dean. But everyone should try.
From ImagesAttr
(1 comments) SHARE More Sharing        Friday, August 14, 2009
Nine Paintings by the Astonishing Memory-Artist Condo George Condo's investigations into portraiture are highly unconventional. Based on imagination and memory, Condo's portraiture has become a springboard for the development of an entirely new language. While drawing on traditional techniques of oil painting, Condo imbues his subjects with a psychological complexity unique in the realm of the portrait.
From ImagesAttr
SHARE More Sharing        Thursday, August 13, 2009
A Review of Greek Cities in Italy and Sicily, by David Randall-MacIver "It was Christian fanatics of the first few centuries after Christ, it was the plundering kings, barons, and prelates of the Middle Ages, and their successors the money-grubbing materialists of the sixteenth, seventeenth, and eighteenth centuries, who destroyed the great monuments of antiquity in Sicily and Southern Italy."
From ImagesAttr
(4 comments) SHARE More Sharing        Saturday, August 8, 2009
The Atomic Bombings, With Reference to American Historical Scholarship Regarding Them Since August 9, 1945 On August 6, 1945, the United States Army Air Force dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan, and three days later on August 9, 1945, the USAAF dropped another atomic bomb on Nagasaki, Japan.
From ImagesAttr
(4 comments) SHARE More Sharing        Sunday, August 2, 2009
Goodbye to John Donne and All That The book Time, Love, Memory: A Great Biologist and His Quest for the Origins of Behavior, by Jonathan Weiner, is a biography of the geneticist Seymour Benzer, and it raises some very disturbing questions.
From ImagesAttr
(4 comments) SHARE More Sharing        Tuesday, July 28, 2009
Alex S. MacLean, Possibly the Finest Low-Altitude Aerial Photographer in the World Pilot and photographer Alex MacLean has flown his plane over much of the United States documenting the landscape.
From ImagesAttr
(1 comments) SHARE More Sharing        Saturday, July 25, 2009
Mediated Knowledge Displayed As If It Were a Landscape: Eleven Works by Vic Muniz "How many people know Smithsons' Spiral Jetty?"
(3 comments) SHARE More Sharing        Saturday, July 25, 2009
We Have All Been Disgraced By Corruption, A Review of Eric Ambler's Doctor Frigo The intrigues in Doctor Frigo take place in the early 1970's and mainly on St. Paul, a typical post-colonial island in the French Antilles in the Caribbean
From ImagesAttr
(2 comments) SHARE More Sharing        Friday, July 10, 2009
Where the Possible and the Impossible Collide: Eleven Photographs by Gregory Crewdson Another Remarkable Photographer at artnet's Artist Works Catalogues.
From ImagesAttr
(6 comments) SHARE More Sharing        Wednesday, July 8, 2009
The Hemingway House Outside of Havana Wins Nationwide Monument Award Finca Vigia, the Cuban house where U.S. writer Ernest Hemingway lived for almost 20 years, received the National Award for the Preservation and Restoration of Monuments in 2007.
From ImagesAttr
(5 comments) SHARE More Sharing        Tuesday, July 7, 2009
An Appreciation of the Movie The Counterfeiters "It takes a clever man to make money; it takes a genius to stay alive."
From ImagesAttr
(3 comments) SHARE More Sharing        Thursday, July 2, 2009
The Miner's Canary: Enlisting Race, Resisting Power, Transforming Democracy, by Lani Guinier and Gerald Torres, et al This Harvard University Press paperback recalls Ralph Ellison's great novel, Invisible Man, because it's the best popular treatise on race relations in America since Ellison's novel of fifty-seven years ago.
From ImagesAttr
(3 comments) SHARE More Sharing        Sunday, June 28, 2009
Cityscapes in Oil ┬ľ Seven Portraits of New York and San Francisco, by Richard Estes I originally saw Telephone Booths by Richard Estes in 2006 and I thought it was a photograph. In fact it's an oil on masonite. But whatever, it knocked me out. All these works by Estes are oils, with five of them painted on canvas, one on board, and the one I originally saw, Telephone Booths on masonite. I hope our New York and California readers take this opportunity to experience recognitions.
From ImagesAttr
(7 comments) SHARE More Sharing        Wednesday, June 24, 2009
Me and the Great Zucchini at UC-Berkeley, in 1973. In the fall of 1974, I got a job as a clerk-typist in the Financial Aid Office of UC-Berkeley, in the Main Administration Building in Sproul Plaza, and I worked there all during the "Watergate Months" of 1975. And... what a time that was!
From ImagesAttr
(8 comments) SHARE More Sharing        Tuesday, June 23, 2009
A1-One's Street Protest Art in Tehran a Big Hit With all eyes on Iran as the country breaks out in protests over the recent presidential election, one local activist gaining an international audience is A1one, an anonymous Tehran-based graffiti artist.
From ImagesAttr
(3 comments) SHARE More Sharing        Thursday, June 18, 2009
The Haunting Photography of Richard Misrach: Five of His Recent Images from Cold Climes Richard Misrach began taking pictures at UC-Berkeley in the late 1960's, and as amply demonstrated by his recent photographs, he still expresses his environmental concerns by making art out of his protest photography.
From ImagesAttr
(18 comments) SHARE More Sharing        Sunday, June 14, 2009
My Trip to Grants Pass in 1975 .
From ImagesAttr
(4 comments) SHARE More Sharing        Sunday, June 7, 2009
My Trip to Cuba in 1998 .
From ImagesAttr
(2 comments) SHARE More Sharing        Sunday, May 31, 2009
A Hell of a Read - The Scientist As Rebel, by Freeman Dyson Freeman Dyson wrote The Scientist as Rebel in 2006. He's the British mathematical physicist who believes in God and explained the mathematics to Richard Feynman that won the latter the Nobel (while they drove from the East Coast to California), and he wrote Disturbing the Universe. The essays in this book are wide-ranging, and wonderful, and this excerpt is from pages 133-138 of Chapter 12, The Force of Reason.
From ImagesAttr
(5 comments) SHARE More Sharing        Monday, May 25, 2009
Black-and-White Photographs From Nicholas Nixon's Brown Sisters Series From 1975 to the present, Nicholas Nixon has been a Professor of Art at the Massachusetts College of Art in Boston.

Page 1 of 2    First  Last   Back  Next  2     View All