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Jeremy Salt  (View How Many People Read This)

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Jeremy Salt has taught at the University of Melbourne, Bosporus University (Istanbul) and Bilkent University (Ankara), specialising in the modern history of the Middle East. His publications include "The Unmaking of the Middle East. A History of Western Disorder in Arab Lands" (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2008.) His latest book is "The Last Ottoman Wars. The Human Cost 1877-1923" (Salt Lake City: University of Utah Press, 2019).


OpEdNews Member for 13 week(s) and 5 day(s)

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Journalism on Trial, From FlickrPhotos
(4 comments) SHARE More Sharing        Monday, September 14, 2020
Why The 'Journalists' Don't Like Julian Why is it that so many journalists have turned their backs on Julian Assange? Why do so many abuse him instead of defending him? He is, after all, a world historic figure who will be remembered centuries from now in the same way we remember Voltaire, Victor Hugo and Thomas Paine.
Panic and the Pandemic 'Down Under': The Ultimate Unseen Enemy, From Uploaded
(1 comments) SHARE More Sharing        Tuesday, July 21, 2020
Panic and the Pandemic 'Down Under': The Ultimate Unseen Enemy The unseen enemy has been a fact of modern life since the 1950s but at least the red under the bed could be seen if found. COVID-19 is the ultimate unseen enemy, because it literally cannot be seen except through a microscope and noon knows where it is and when it will strike. The panic generated by the spread of the virus is completely disproportionate to the risk of dying from it.