Send a Tweet
Most Popular Choices
Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on LinkedIn Share on Reddit Tell A Friend Printer Friendly Page Save As Favorite View Favorites
Exclusive to OpEdNews:
Life Arts

College Selection Tips

By       Message Reecy Aresty       (Page 1 of 1 pages)     Permalink    (# of views)   No comments

Related Topic(s): ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; (more...) ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; , Add Tags  (less...)
Add to My Group(s)

View Ratings | Rate It

opednews.com

Author 3294
- Advertisement -
It is highly recommended that early in the college selection process, the entire family visit schools to determine suitability. The criteria to be considered before submitting an application should include:

· Average GPA, SAT/ACT scores, class rank
· Variety of career choices, in the event the student changes their major
· Size, location, Greeks, religious affiliation
· Percentage of freshmen who return for year two
· Percentage of freshmen who graduate in four years
· Percentage of financial need met
· Percentage of gift aid/self-help awarded
· On or off campus job opportunities
· Meal plans and dietary situations met
· Name recognition
· Student/teacher ratio
· Average class size, semester or trimester
· Percentage of professors who teach and percentage of teaching assistants
· 2 or 4-year college or university
· Availability of Co-ed dorms
· Freshman cars permitted
· Handicap accessibility
· Cost of the sheepskin

Additionally, families need to determine if the school uses a need-blind or need-sensitive admissions policy:

Need-blind is a practice where students are evaluated without any regard to family income or assets. Need-sensitive is a shameful policy used by a host of elite schools such as Duke, Emory and Stanford. These schools will admit a less than qualified rich kid in anticipation of a large contribution to their endowment fund. In essence, the wealthy family has bought an admission ticket to a school where their student might never have otherwise been accepted.

Families should visit potential schools no later than the 10th grade. Colleges are always impressed when a 9th or 10th grader pays an official visit. By keeping in touch with officials you've met, students will have added points to both their GPA and SAT scores by establishing a rapport. When the time comes, administrators will be able to associate a face with the application. This helps a merely qualified student become more acceptable. However, before packing your bags and filling up the SUV with gas, make a checklist that includes the following:

· Confirm that every school you plan to visit will be in session.
· Ask plenty of questions and be an attentive listener.
· Bring a video camera or tape recorder for your notes.
· Find out who reads applications from your area, and if possible, try to meet with a reader and keep in touch with them.
· Student athletes should meet with a coach or two.
· Listen to the school radio station.
· Get a copy of the campus newspaper.
· If the student has Greek intentions, visit some frat or sorority houses.
· Check out a dorm unannounced.
· Introduce yourself to attending students and pick their brains.
· Have a snack in the cafeteria. After all, their food is what the student will consume for the next four years.

Students who have decided upon their course of study should make every effort to arrange a meeting with the head of that particular department and audit a class or two. This may require an overnight, giving the student a greater opportunity to check out some dorms.

Recommended college selection websites:

· For alternative criteria go to: www.fairtest.org or call 617-864-4810. They have a list of some 300 schools that apply non-traditional guidelines.

· Afro-American schools: www.blackhighereducation.com/hbcu.html

· Jesuit schools: www.ajcunet.edu

· Jewish affiliation: www.hillel.org

· Trade and vocational schools: www.overview.com/colleges/

 

- Advertisement -

View Ratings | Rate It

opednews.com

Reecy Aresty has been a financial advisor since 1977. He has authored the critically acclaimed, "How To Pay For College Without Going Broke," an invaluable, parent/student admissions/financial aid manual. Arguably the most revealing book ever (more...)
 

Reecy Aresty Social Media Pages: Facebook page url on login Profile not filled in       Twitter page url on login Profile not filled in       Linkedin page url on login Profile not filled in       Instagram page url on login Profile not filled in

Go To Commenting
The views expressed herein are the sole responsibility of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of this website or its editors.
Writers Guidelines
Contact AuthorContact Author Contact EditorContact Editor Author PageView Authors' Articles
Support OpEdNews

OpEdNews depends upon can't survive without your help.

If you value this article and the work of OpEdNews, please either Donate or Purchase a premium membership.

STAY IN THE KNOW
If you've enjoyed this, sign up for our daily or weekly newsletter to get lots of great progressive content.
Daily Weekly     OpEdNews Newsletter
Name
Email
   (Opens new browser window)
 

Most Popular Articles by this Author:     (View All Most Popular Articles by this Author)

The all-important college application essay

Private Scholarships – the billion dollar rip-off exposed

How To Pay For College Without Going Broke

Letters of Recommendation - A College Must!

529 Savings Plans, Trick or Treat?

The College Early Bird Menu