Send a Tweet
- Advertisement -
Most Popular Choices
Share on Facebook 9 Share on Twitter Printer Friendly Page More Sharing
Exclusive to OpEdNews:
OpEdNews Op Eds    H3'ed 8/9/19

What None of the Presidential Candidates Addresses Concerning Health Insurance

By       (Page 1 of 1 pages)     (# of views)   No comments
Author 84384
Follow Me on Twitter     Message Joel Joseph
- Advertisement -

At the Democratic debates, the issue of healthcare took center stage. There were two camps: one for Medicare for all, the other for allowing Americans to keep their employer-paid health insurance. Not one of the candidates mentioned that private health insurance paid for by manufacturers, like General Motors, and costs the American economy millions of jobs.

President Trump, on the other hand, has no healthcare plan at all. He is still fighting Obamacare. Apparently, Mr. Trump does not understand that our private health insurance system makes the United States less competitive in the world economy.

In Canada, General Motors saves $1,500-$2,000 per car because health insurance is paid for by Canadian provincial governments. This has increased Canadian auto manufacturing significantly. Canada manufactures one-third as many cars as are made in the USA, but has one-tenth of the population. In other words Canada makes three times as many cars as the United States per capita. This is primarily a result of the way Canada finances healthcare.

Similarly, all European countries cover workers health insurance, keeping those costs away from manufacturers. The massive German auto industry thus has a significant cost advantage over U.S. car manufacturers.

- Advertisement -

In Mexico, Ford, GM and Chrysler pay workers $2 an hour, less than they pay in the United States for health insurance alone. Before NAFTA, Mexico hardly made any vehicles. They made 547,000 cars in Mexico in 1990, a few years before NAFTA went into effect. Today, they make 4 million cars in Mexico annually compared to only 3 million cars made in the USA. Mexico manufactures more cars than the United States with only 40% of our population.

What Can We Do About It?

If health insurance were paid for by the government, all U.S. manufacturers will be more competitive. This means that members of the United Auto Workers will have to give up their gold-plated private health insurance. In exchange, the U.S. auto manufacturers, including Honda, Toyota, Mercedes, Volkswagen and BMW, should pay their workers more.

- Advertisement -

Presidential candidate Andrew Yang wants the government to hand out $1,000 per month to every man, woman and child in the United States. Instead of this outlandish give-away, the federal government should cover Medicare for all Americans, with no premiums and 100% coverage. This would level the playing field and allow American manufacturers to compete in the global marketplace.

Medicare for All is Not Enough

Medicare is exceptionally complicated. The government pays for Part A, which covers eighty percent of hospitalization costs. Part B covers out-of-hospital care, and it costs about $135 per month to cover 80% of the costs. Most retirees then pay for additional private insurance to pick up the 20% that Medicare doesn't pay for. I pay about $180 a month for this coverage. So even though I am on Medicare, I pay more than $300 per month for supplemental private insurance. All of these additional expenses should be covered by the federal government, as they are in Canada and Europe.

How Would We Pay for It?

Corporations are now paying a smaller proportion of the federal budget than they ever have. In 1960, when John F. Kennedy was president, the corporate income tax accounted for 23 percent of all federal revenue. Now corporations are paying less than 10% of federal revenue. The Trump tax reduction lowered the U.S. corporate tax rate to 21%. The top individual tax rate is 37%. In 2010, in the Citizens United case, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that corporations are people under the constitution and entitled to constitutional rights. If corporations are persons under the constitution, then why should they pay a lower rate than individuals? If corporations have equal rights, they should pay equal taxes.

Because of tax loopholes, massive corporations like General Electric and Amazon pay no federal income tax at all. This must change. If we get rid of all tax loopholes and tax corporations at the same rates paid by individual taxpayers, we can provide every American with government-paid-for healthcare.

- Advertisement -

 

- Advertisement -

Rate It | View Ratings

Joel Joseph Social Media Pages: Facebook page url on login Profile not filled in       Twitter page url on login Profile not filled in       Linkedin page url on login Profile not filled in       Instagram page url on login Profile not filled in

Chairman, Made in the USA Foundation, economist and lawyer, author of ten books and hundreds of articles.
Go To Commenting
The views expressed herein are the sole responsibility of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of this website or its editors.
Writers Guidelines
Contact AuthorContact Author Contact EditorContact Editor Author PageView Authors' Articles
Support OpEdNews

OpEdNews depends upon can't survive without your help.

If you value this article and the work of OpEdNews, please either Donate or Purchase a premium membership.

STAY IN THE KNOW
If you've enjoyed this, sign up for our daily or weekly newsletter to get lots of great progressive content.
Daily Weekly     OpEdNews Newsletter
Name
Email
   (Opens new browser window)
 

Most Popular Articles by this Author:     (View All Most Popular Articles by this Author)

The Trumps and Jared Kushner Cheated Their Way into Elite Colleges

Outsourcing Obamacare

Shame on Ralph Lauren and the US Open

Great American Products to Buy Labor Day Weekend

U.S Trade Deficit Causes Income Inequality

Trade Promotion Authority is Unconstitutional

Comments Image Post Article Comment and Rate This Article

These discussions are not moderated. We rely on users to police themselves, and flag inappropriate comments and behavior. In accordance with our Guidelines and Policies, we reserve the right to remove any post at any time for any reason, and will restrict access of registered users who repeatedly violate our terms.

  • OpEdNews welcomes lively, CIVIL discourse. Personal attacks and/or hate speech are not tolerated and may result in banning.
  • Comments should relate to the content above. Irrelevant, off-topic comments are a distraction, and will be removed.
  • By submitting this comment, you agree to all OpEdNews rules, guidelines and policies.
          

Comment Here:   



You can enter 2000 characters. To remove limit, please click here.
Please login or register. Afterwards, your comment will be published.
 
Username
Password

Forgot your password? Click here and we will send an email to the address you used when you registered.
First Name
Last Name

I am at least 16 years of age
(make sure username & password are filled in. Note that username must be an email address.)

No comments  Post Comment

 
Want to post your own comment on this Article? Post Comment