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OpEdNews Op Eds    H4'ed 12/25/18

The US is on the edge of the economic precipice -- Trump may push it over

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From The Guardian

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Government shutdowns hurt millions. Great depressions hurt even more. History suggests real pain is round the corner


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On Friday, Donald Trump said: "We are totally prepared for a very long shutdown." It was one of his rare uses of the pronoun "we" instead of his preferred and in this case far more appropriate "I."

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Don't count on American consumers to come to the rescue. Most Americans are still living in the shadow of the Great Recession that started in December 2007 and officially ended in June 2009.

More Americans have jobs, to be sure, but their pay has barely risen when adjusted for inflation. Many are worse off due to the escalating costs of housing, healthcare and education.

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Trump has added to their financial burdens by undermining the Affordable Care Act, rolling back overtime pay, hobbling their ability to join together in unions, allowing states to cut Medicaid, and imposing tariffs that increase the prices of many goods.

America's wealthy, meanwhile, have been taking home a growing portion of the nation's total income. But the rich spend a small fraction of what they earn. The economy depends on the spending of middle-, working-class and poor families.

The only way these Americans have continued to spend is by going deeper into debt. By the third quarter of this year, household debt had reached a record $13.5tn. Almost 80% of Americans are now living paycheck to paycheck.

This isn't sustainable. Even if the Fed weren't raising interest rates -- an unwise move under these circumstances -- consumers would still be in trouble. Mortgage, auto and student-debt delinquencies are already mounting.

The last time household debt was nearly this high was in 2007, just before the Great Recession. Similarly, between 1913 and 1928, the ratio of personal debt to the total national economy nearly doubled. Then came the Great Crash.

See a pattern?

The problem isn't that Americans are living beyond their means. It's that their means haven't been keeping up with the growing economy. Most gains have gone to the top. If the majority of households had taken home a larger share of national income, they wouldn't have needed to go so deeply into debt.

Without wage growth, American workers can't continue to buy without going into deeper debt. Unless they continue to buy, the economy can't continue to move forward.

It's the same sort of trap that preceded the 2008 and 1929 crashes.

After the 1929 crash, the government invented new ways to boost the wages of most Americans -- social security, unemployment insurance, overtime pay, a minimum wage -- the requirement that employers bargain with labor unions, and, finally, a full-employment program called the second world war.

By contrast, after the 2007 crash, the government bailed out the banks and pumped enough money into the economy to stop the slide. But apart from the Affordable Care Act, nothing was done to address the underlying problem of stagnant wages.

Ten years after the start of the Great Recession, we face another economic precipice.

It's important to understand that the root cause of those former collapses wasn't a banking crisis. It was the growing imbalance between consumer spending and total output brought on by stagnant wages and widening inequality.That imbalance is back.

Trump is making it worse.

 

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Robert Reich, former U.S. Secretary of Labor and Professor of Public Policy at the University of California at Berkeley, has a new film, "Inequality for All," to be released September 27. He blogs at www.robertreich.org.

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