Send a Tweet
Most Popular Choices
Share on Facebook 25 Share on Twitter Printer Friendly Page More Sharing
Life Arts    H2'ed 8/30/20

Doublethink, Doublethink: It's Two Thinks in One!

By       (Page 1 of 4 pages)   1 comment, In Series: Book Reviews
Become a Premium Member Would you like to know how many people have read this article? Or how reputable the author is? Simply sign up for a Advocate premium membership and you'll automatically see this data on every article. Plus a lot more, too.
Author 517692
Follow Me on Twitter     Message John Hawkins
Become a Fan
  (3 fans)

By John Kendall Hawkins

"If you want a vision of the future, imagine a boot stamping on a human face -- forever.

- O'Brien to Winston Smith in George Orwell's Nineteen Eighty-Four

Just over seventy years ago, on August 29, 1949, the Soviets successfully tested their first nuclear bomb, and became the only other state power on the planet, after the United States, with nuclear WMD. Thus commenced an ever-expanding arms race between the two global powers in what became known as the Cold War. Democracy versus Totalitarianism, duking it out, like rock'em-sock'em robots (sold in America; means of production: Marx!), in proxy battles from Central America to the Middle East to Vietnam -- held in check by one lone term of engagement: MAD, Mutually Assured Destruction. America has been at war with Russia my entire life. That year also saw the publication of George Orwell's dystopian novel, Nineteen Eighty-Four, which enacts a future where such forces -- Oceania and Eastasia -- have gone from Cold to Hot.

Thirty five years later, the real-world Oceania and Eastasia, flashed hot eyes at each other, Ronald Reagan and Mikhail Gorbachev not blinking. Reagan was all Bonzo giddy, feeling oats he hadn't felt since his Hollywood Western days, pressing a presumed advantage -- telling Gorby to "tear down that [Berlin] wall," touting Star Wars (an ICBM missile shield defense system), and waxing so jocular, at one point, that during a break in a radio interview Reagan's flippant words ("the bombing begins in five minutes") put the Soviets on edge -- and red alert. (An even more flippant NBC commentator quipped that the alert may have been triggered by a lone drunken Russian officer).

But it wasn't all a Deep State chucklefestival. Two graphic films depicting nuclear annihilation, Threads (1983) and The Day After (1984) reminded everybody just how close to MAD Oceania and Eastasia were getting. Tensions were ratcheted to the breaking point: The Soviet economy was teetering; the Berlin Wall fell five years later; the USSR crumbled and Gorbachev eventually gave way to the Russian Trump -- Boris Yeltsin. Oceania giddyupped into Eastasia with strings-attached Das Kapital shortly thereafter. Not every Muscovite was gleeful to see the Golden Arches roll into town, driven by the clown-Christ of capitalism, Ronald McDonald. Nyet, some nationalists griped, while scarfing down a Quarterpounder™ with cheese -- and borschtroot -- and condemblating how to meddle in future American helectoral process.

Thirty five years later, we have our own clown-Christ of capitalism, pre-kompromised, installed in the Oval Office, the result of, US intelligence agencies allege, Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election. Since then, a form of sado-masochistic paranoia seems to have gripped the nation -- the president ("Fake News"), the MSM ("Putin's Puppet"), the People ("they looked left, they looked right, but they couldn't tell the difference"). In his new biography, The Ministry of Truth, Dorian Lynskey notes that just four days after Trump's 2017 Inauguration, "US sales of [Nineteen Eighty-Four rocketed] by almost 10,000 per cent, making it a number-one best seller."

Lynskey attributes this panic-driven sales soar to claims by the new administration that Trump attracted the "'largest audience to ever witness an inauguration -- period -- both in person and around the globe.'" It was a wild claim, immediately debunked by the MSM, but doubled down on by Trump adviser, Kelly Anne Conway, who dismissed the glaring evidence and pronounced that the new administration would be opting to go with "alternative facts." Alarm bells went off across the media frontier. As Lynskey's citing of the statistic suggests, this sounded an awful lot like the "doublethink" gobbledygook of Orwell's totalitarian nightmare, Nineteen Eighty-Four. If people were going to be living in a parallel universe, they wanted to know what to expect.

Like Dorian Lynskey's previous work, 33 Revolutions Per Minute: A History of Protest Songs, in The Ministry of Truth the author shows he is adept at showing the confluence of ideas expressed by the voices of myriad protest leaders, whether through song or, if you will, dystopian visions. Ministry is a biography limited to an exploration of the etiology of Orwell's masterwork, Nineteen Eighty-Four (and to some degree, Animal Farm).

In Part One, Lynskey traces the roots and evolution of Orwell's creative and political ideas, his experiences fighting fascists and communists; and, the literary influence of H.G. Wells, Eugene Zamiatin, and a wealth of others in a cross-pollination and intertextuality that not only help define the genre but demonstrate the interpenetration of human ideas in general. In Part Two, Lynskey traces "the political and cultural life" of the novel, from Orwell's death to Trump's Inauguration. The point being, to show that Orwell's presence is still relevant, even among the impressive millennials.

Like so many other European and American Lefties who signed on as mercenaries to fight against the fascists in the Spanish Civil War from 1936-39, George Orwell came away from the shattering experience thoroughly disillusioned, his ideals in disarray. "The fascists had behaved just as appallingly as he had expected they would," Lynskey writes, "but the ruthlessness and dishonesty of the communists had shocked him." He'd come to fight in a great battle of Good versus Evil -- writers like Ernest Hemingway, Martha Gelhorn and John Dos Passos had come to bear witness -- but "[w]hat he found was 'a bad copy of 1914-18, a positional war of trenches, artillery, raids, snipers, mud, barbed wire, lice and stagnation.'"

Further, reading battle reports, Orwell discovered "that the Left-wing press [was] every bit as spurious and dishonest as that of the Right." However, aside from the usual horrors of the war and the way they were reported, Orwell did experience moments that would prove useful in his writing of Nineteen Eighty-Four. Lynskey writes,

Orwell found in the trenches a superior version of the cleansing egalitarianism that he had found among the tramps, and it made him a socialist at last.

Next Page  1  |  2  |  3  |  4

(Note: You can view every article as one long page if you sign up as an Advocate Member, or higher).

 

Rate It | View Ratings

John Hawkins Social Media Pages: Facebook page url on login Profile not filled in       Twitter Page       Linked In Page       Instagram page url on login Profile not filled in

John Kendall Hawkins is an American ex-pat freelance journalist and poet currently residing in Australia. His poetry, commentary, and reviews have appeared in publications in Oceania, Europe and the USA, such as Cordite, Morning Star, Hanging (more...)
 

Go To Commenting
The views expressed herein are the sole responsibility of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of this website or its editors.
Follow Me on Twitter     Writers Guidelines
Contact AuthorContact Author Contact EditorContact Editor Author PageView Authors' Articles
Support OpEdNews

OpEdNews depends upon can't survive without your help.

If you value this article and the work of OpEdNews, please either Donate or Purchase a premium membership.

STAY IN THE KNOW
If you've enjoyed this, sign up for our daily or weekly newsletter to get lots of great progressive content.
Daily Weekly     OpEdNews Newsletter
Name
Email
   (Opens new browser window)
 

Most Popular Articles by this Author:     (View All Most Popular Articles by this Author)

Chicago 7: Counter Cultural Learnings of America for Make Money Glorious Nation of Post-Truthvaluestan

Finding the Mother Tree: An Interview with Suzanne Simard

Sonnet: Mother's Day Poem

Dylan at 80: A Sonnet of Appreciation

Assange: "Send Him Back" to Australia

Trump's Coy Mystery: The Kiss of Death

To View Comments or Join the Conversation: