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OpEdNews Op Eds    H2'ed 4/20/19

A Message From the Future With Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez

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From The Intercept

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez
Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez
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The Intercept launches "A Message From the Future With Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez," a seven-minute film narrated by the congresswoman and illustrated by Molly Crabapple. Set a couple of decades from now, it's a flat-out rejection of the idea that a dystopian future is a forgone conclusion. Instead, it offers a thought experiment: What if we decided not to drive off the climate cliff? What if we chose to radically change course and save both our habitat and ourselves?

What if we actually pulled off a Green New Deal? What would the future look like then?

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This is a project unlike any we have done before, crossing boundaries between fact, fiction, and visual art, co-directed by Kim Boekbinder and Jim Batt and co-written by Ocasio-Cortez and Avi Lewis. To reclaim a phrase from House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, it's our "green dream," inspired by the explosion of utopian art produced during the original New Deal.

And it's a collaboration with a context and a history that seems worth sharing.

Back in December, I started talking to Crabapple the brilliant illustrator, writer, and filmmaker about how we could involve more artists in the Green New Deal vision. Most art forms are pretty low carbon, after all, and cultural production played an absolutely central role during Franklin D. Roosevelt's New Deal in the 1930s.

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We thought it was time to galvanize artists into that kind of social mission again but not in a couple of years, if politicians and activists manage to translate what is still only a rough plan into law. No, we wanted to see Green New Deal art right away to help win the battle for hearts and minds that will determined whether it has a fighting chance in the first place.

Crabapple, along with Boekbinder and Batt, have been honing a filmmaking style that has proved enormously successful at spreading bold ideas fast, most virally in their video with Jay Z on the "epic fail" of the war on drugs. "I would love to make a video on the Green New Deal with AOC," Crabapple said, which seemed to me like a dream team.

The question was: How do we tell the story of something that hasn't happened yet?

We realized that the biggest obstacle to the kind of transformative change the Green New Deal envisions is overcoming the skepticism that humanity could ever pull off something at this scale and speed. That's the message we've been hearing from the "serious" center for four months straight: that it's too big, too ambitious, that our Twitter-addled brains are incapable of it, and that we are destined to just watch walruses fall to their deaths on Netflix until it's too late.

This skepticism is understandable. The idea that societies could collectively decide to embrace rapid foundational changes to transportation, housing, energy, agriculture, forestry, and more precisely what is needed to avert climate breakdown is not something for which most of us have any living reference. We have grown up bombarded with the message that there is no alternative to the crappy system that is destabilizing the planet and hoarding vast wealth at the top. From most economists, we hear that we are fundamentally selfish, gratification-seeking units. From historians, we learn that social change has always been the work of singular great men.

Science fiction hasn't been much help either. Almost every vision of the future that we get from best-selling novels and big-budget Hollywood films takes some kind of ecological and social apocalypse for granted. It's almost as if we have collectively stopped believing that the future is going to happen, let alone that it could be better, in many ways, than the present.

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The media debates that paint the Green New Deal as either impossibly impractical or a recipe for tyranny just reinforce the sense of futility. But here's the good news: The old New Deal faced almost precisely the same kinds of opposition and it didn't stop it for a minute.

From the start, elite critics derided FDR's plans as everything from creeping fascism to closet communism. In the 1933 equivalent of "They're coming for your hamburgers!" Republican Sen. Henry D. Hatfield of West Virginia wrote to a colleague, "This is despotism, this is tyranny, this is the annihilation of liberty. The ordinary American is thus reduced to the status of a robot." A former DuPont executive complained that with the government offering decent-paying jobs, "five negroes on my place in South Carolina refused work this spring ... and a cook on my houseboat in Fort Myers quit because the government was paying him a dollar an hour as a painter."

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Naomi Klein is the author of The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism, now out in paperback. To read all her latest writing visit www.naomiklein.org

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