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She's At it Again: Wyneva Johnson, Black AUSA, "Defending Discriminators"

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Ms. Wyneva Johnson is an African-American female employed with the United States Justice Department.   Her disheartening job, as an Assistant United States attorney (AUSA), is to vigorously defend the government against charges of employment discrimination.   Johnson, who stated at a Wheaton College commencement reunion held earlier this year that she lived most of her life in the "segregated Mississippi delta", now pridefully serves as guard for those accused of violating the civil rights laws. http://wheatoncollege.edu/quarterly/files/2011/05/Q-570_Wyneva-Johnson.jpg

Dr. Marsha Coleman Adebayo, author of the book -- entitled No FEAR: A Whistleblower's Triumph over Corruption and Retaliation at the EPA, discusses when she first met Johnson.  As recounted in the book: No FEAR, http://www.marshacoleman-adebayo.com/ Coleman-Adebayo, a MIT-trained political scientist, tells of her painful encounter opposite another highly educated African-American female, AUSA-Wyneva Johnson.   Dr. Coleman-Adebayo exposes how Johnson and other African-American AUSAs are serving as willing pawns of the Department of Justice to defend the government against employment discrimination charges lodged by minority plaintiffs.

Over ten years ago, Dr.Marsha Coleman-Adebayo filed an employment discrimination case against her then-employer, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). (Marsha L. Coleman-Adebayo v. Carol M. Browner, Civil Case 98-CV926 and 98-CV-1939).   AUSA Wyneva Johnson, a graduate from Wheaton College "class of 71", unsuccessfully defended and lost the government's case against employment discrimination charges lodged by Dr. Coleman-Adebayo. Despite Johnson's best efforts to defend the unlawful actions of EPA public officials, a jury found EPA guilty of race, color and sexual discrimination. The jury also found the EPA guilty of a creating a racially and sexually hostile work environment for Coleman-Adebayo. http://www.time.com/time/nation/article/0,8599,100423,00.html

Presently, Johnson is defending the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services against the discrimination claims of another highly educated African-American female. The plaintiff in the case is Ms. Arthuretta Holmes-Martin. Holmes-Martin, v. Sebelius, Civil Action No. 07-2128. Ms. Holmes-Martin had served as the HHS Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization (OSDBU) Deputy Director before she was terminated from the Department. Ms. Holmes-Martin asserts that "Debbie Ridgely," former Director of HHS's OSDBU, discriminated against her on the basis of her race and retaliated against her for her involvement in protected equal employment opportunity (EEO) activity by transferring her deputy director duties to Clarence Randall (Caucasian male), awarding Randall the title of "Special Advisor," reassigning many of her projects, and terminating her employment.  See U.S. District Judge Ricardo M. Urbina's Memorandum Opinion dated March 17, 2010. http://law.justia.com/cases/federal/district-courts/district-of-columbia/dcdce/1:2007cv02128/128537/36

In the Memorandum Opinion, U.S. District Judge Urbina found that the plaintiff (Holmes-Martin) offered some evidence that "Ridgely held discriminatory views" (p. 17).   Despite evidence of workplace discrimination against Holmes-Martin, AUSA W yneva Johnson, one of DoJ's most senior African-American attorneys, forges vigorously ahead this week to try to convince a jury that HHS is "not guilty" of discriminating against another highly educated, high performing African-American female whose job was to ensure equity in HHS contracting opportuniti es to minorities and women.

Wyneva Johnson is at it again.

As stated by Dr.Coleman-Adebayo in her No FEAR book (page 205):

"Black AUSAs were statistically nonexistent before the civil rights movement had forced the Department of Justice to hire African Americans and other people of color.   Ironically, all those years later, black AUSAs in the Civil Division routinely defended accused discriminators in the federal government and shredded victims of discrimination. One might think that people who had gained their foot hold in society would have had troubled consciences defending discriminators. Yet, had Fredrick Douglass, Martin Luther King, Jr. or Walter Fauntroy filed a complaint of discrimination against the federal government Wyneva and her cohorts would have vigorously defended the government against their charges."

 

http//www.coalition4change.org

The Coalition For Change, Inc.(C4C). C4C is a "support group" and a proactive non-profit organization comprised of former and present employees who have been injured or ill-treated due to workplace discrimination and/or reprisal. Twitter name - (more...)
 
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