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Oil War: Putting Out Fire with Gasoline in Libya

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By Susan Lindauer, former U.S. Intelligence Asset covering Libya and Iraq at the United Nations

War doesn't work, does it? Best case scenario, NATO's war against Libya will run 18 to 24 months unless decisive action is taken right now--this day--to end the military confrontation.

Moussa Koussa, Libya's Foreign Minister who defected to Britain on March 30, warns Libya is in danger of becoming the "New Somalia."

Violence is erupting from both sides. The ugly truth is that with every missile strike, NATO kills more and more Libyan people.

NATO cares nothing for the Saudi invasion of Bahrain, which has resulted in wide-scale disappearances of democracy activists. NATO cares nothing for the uprisings in Yemen, peppered with government snipers. Only Libya has been singled out for violent retribution. Of course, this is an oil grab. Gadhaffi challenged U.S. (and probably British) oil companies to reimburse Libya for the economic damage caused by U.N. sanctions tied to the Lockerbie bombing, which Libya had nothing to do with. The U.N. Security Council forced Libya to submit to the Lockerbie Trial and pay $2.7 billion in damages to the families of Pan Am 103, only for the U.S. to bribe witnesses with $4 million payments to testify against Libya's men at Trial.

The judicial corruption at The Hague underscored the absence of evidence against Abdelbassett Megrahi and Al-Amin Fhaima. Under the circumstances, it's hard to blame Gadhaffi for wanting to take something back for his people. The United Nations was grossly in error to apply sanctions to Libya in the first place.

But other than holding power for 42 years against a tide of popular support for fresh voices, is Gadhaffi really so bad? The Libyan people receive a cash distribution of oil revenues every year, houses, education and free health care under Gadhaffi's regime. They enjoy one of the lowest poverty rates in the world--an enviable 5 percent, an 82 percent literacy rate, and a life expectancy of 75 years, 10 percent above the world average. Yet suddenly NATO is determined to break Gadhaffi's hold on power, as if they've recently uncovered some great evil.

The facts are that an alarming number of Libyan rebels are returning from conflicts in Iraq, Chechnya, the Balkans and Afghanistan. Warfare is what they know, and they've brought it home with them. They have articulated no vision for the future. Instead, they have demonstrated an insatiable hunger for violence. No bombing is ever enough. Like tyrants they shout for more NATO bombs. They are guaranteed to destroy Libya if NATO doesn't pull the plug.

NATO has only itself to blame. By rushing to take sides, NATO has lost the ability to apply its influence to both parties, and press for a non-violent transition to power-sharing. By adopting the role of arms supplier to the rebels, NATO has ratcheted up the internal power struggle in Tripoli, which should have exhausted its objectives in a couple of weeks, if not for outside meddling.

THINK PEACE:

It doesn't have to go this way.

Thankfully, the African Union has applied its influence in Tripoli to push for a ceasefire and immediate access to humanitarian assistance for Libya's people. The Presidents of South Africa, Mali, the Congo and Mauritania achieved this victory in diplomatic sessions with Libyan leader Moammar Gadhaffi over the weekend, joined by the Chair of the African Union Commission and the Peace and Security Division.

The international community should demand that NATO accept the African Union platform immediately, whether Libya's rebels approve or not. It's NATO's responsibility to deliver the message that for the sake of the world community, there must be a truce so that political talks can resume.

International oil corporations should likewise take an honest look at their bottom line, and acknowledge that a prolonged war in Libya is guaranteed to damage oil structures and distribution mechanisms upon which oil trading depends. Any protracted Oil War will hurt their profits, too. Most unforgivably, War in Libya will harm the global economy, driving up energy and freight transportation costs at a most difficult moment.

The African Union gets NATO out of this trap. It achieves the most pressing goals of the United Nations mandate in Libya, upon which NATO has claimed authority for its air strikes.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iy7sbagRV-A&feature=player_embedded

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Susan Lindauer was a U.S. Asset and one of the very first non-Arab Americans indicted on the Patriot Act, accused of acting as an "Iraqi Agent" for opposing the War. She was imprisoned on Carswell Air Force Base for a year without a trial, while the (more...)
 
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There are ways to achieve the same goals without d... by Susan Lindauer on Tuesday, Apr 12, 2011 at 5:52:33 PM
I applaud your trying to come up with a peaceful s... by Mac McKinney on Tuesday, Apr 12, 2011 at 7:48:44 PM
With all respect, you are mistaken. The caricatu... by Susan Lindauer on Wednesday, Apr 13, 2011 at 9:26:45 AM
With all due respect, you are woefully misinformed... by Mac McKinney on Wednesday, Apr 13, 2011 at 11:45:02 AM
I'm glad Mac has said it so I don't have to. It's ... by Eric Scheihagen on Thursday, Apr 14, 2011 at 10:27:04 PM
What about falsely accusing a man of terrorism &am... by Susan Lindauer on Friday, Apr 15, 2011 at 9:39:52 AM
I wouldn't characterize Susan's views as defending... by Paul McArthur on Friday, Apr 15, 2011 at 11:01:22 AM
Bombing Libya with depleted uranium weapons is hum... by conrad elledge on Wednesday, Apr 13, 2011 at 4:05:38 PM
As we've recently heard, the author feels Gaddafi-... by Gustav Wynn on Wednesday, Apr 13, 2011 at 10:14:58 AM
if I'm not mistaken! After so long, I sympathize w... by Susan Lindauer on Thursday, Apr 14, 2011 at 8:08:28 AM
The author has explained that citizens of Libya ha... by Peter Duveen on Wednesday, Apr 13, 2011 at 5:59:15 PM
I believe you mean the Red Crescent, not the Red C... by Dave Kisor on Wednesday, Apr 13, 2011 at 6:17:24 PM
Good catch! ... by Susan Lindauer on Wednesday, Apr 13, 2011 at 6:20:19 PM