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The circus: How British intelligence primed both sides of the 'terror war'

By   Follow Me on Twitter     Message Nafeez Ahmed       (Page 1 of 4 pages)     Permalink    (# of views)   1 comment

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Reprinted from middleeasteye.net

Every time there's a terrorist attack that makes national headlines, the same talking heads seem to pop up like an obscene game of "whack-a-mole". Often they appear one after the other across the media circuit, bobbing from celebrity television pundit to erudite newspaper outlet.

A few years ago, BBC Newsnight proudly hosted a "debate" between Maajid Nawaz, director of counter-extremism think-tank, the Quilliam Foundation, and Anjem Choudary, head of the banned Islamist group formerly known as al-Muhajiroun, which has, since its proscription, repeatedly reincarnated itself. One of its more well-known recent incarnations was "Islam4UK".

Both Nawaz and Choudary have received huge mainstream media attention, generating press headlines, and contributing to major TV news and current affairs shows. But unbeknown to most, they have one thing in common: Britain's security services. And believe it or not, that bizarre fact explains why the Islamic State's (IS) celebrity beheader, former west Londoner Mohammed Emwazi -- aka "

From youtube.com/watch?v=lE17QGHfPkk: 'Jihadi John'
'Jihadi John'
(Image by YouTube)
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" - got to where he is now.


A tale of two extremists

After renouncing his affiliation with the Islamist group Hizb ut-Tahrir (HT), Maajid Nawaz co-founded the Quilliam Foundation with his fellow ex-Hizb member, Ed Husain.

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The Quilliam Foundation was set-up by Husain and Nawaz in 2008 with significant British government financial support. Its establishment received a massive PR boost from the release of Ed Husain's memoirs, The Islamist, which rapidly became an international bestseller, generating hundreds of reviews, interviews and articles.

In Ed Husain's book - much like Maajid Nawaz's tome Radical released more recently to similar fanfare - Husain recounts his journey from aggrieved young Muslim into Islamist activist, and eventually his total rejection of Islamist ideology.

Both accounts of their journeys of transformation offer provocative and genuine insights. But the British government has played a much more direct role in crafting those accounts than either they, or the government, officially admit.

Government ghostwriters

In late 2013, I interviewed a former senior researcher at the Home Office who revealed that Husain's The Islamist was "effectively ghostwritten in Whitehall".

The official told me that in 2006, he was informed by a government colleague "with close ties" to Jack Straw and Gordon Brown that "the draft was written by Ed but then 'peppered' by government input". The civil servant told him "he had seen 'at least five drafts of the book, and the last one was dramatically different from the first.'"

The draft had, the source said, been manipulated in an explicitly political, pro-government manner. The committee that had input into Ed Husain's manuscript prior to its official publication included senior government officials from No. 10 Downing Street, the Joint Terrorism Analysis Centre, the intelligence services, Foreign & Commonwealth Office and the Home Office.

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When I put the question, repeatedly, to Ed Husain as to the veracity of these allegations, he did not respond. I also asked Nawaz whether he was aware of the government's role in "ghostwriting" Husain's prose, and whether he underwent a similar experience in the production of Radical. He did not respond either.

While Husain was liaising with British government and intelligence officials over The Islamist from 2006 until the book's publication in May 2007, his friend Nawaz was at first in prison in Egypt. Nawaz was eventually released in March 2006, declaring his departure from HT just a month before the publication of Husain's book. Husain took credit for being the prime influence on Nawaz's decision, and by November 2007, had joined with him becoming Quilliam's director with Husain as his deputy.

Yet according to Husain, Nawaz played a role in determining parts of the text of The Islamist in the same year it was being edited by government officials. "Before publication, I discussed with my friend and brother-in-faith Maajid the passages in the book," wrote Husain about the need to verify details of their time in HT.

This is where the chronology of Husain's and Nawaz's accounts begin to break down. In Radical, and repeatedly in interviews about his own deradicalisation process, Nawaz says that he firmly and decisively rejected HT's Islamist ideology while in prison in Egypt. Yet upon his release and return to Britain, Nawaz showed no sign of having reached that decision. Instead, he did the opposite. In April 2006, Nawaz told Sarah Montague on BBC Hardtalk that his detention in Egypt had "convinced [him] even more" that there is a need to establish this Caliphate as soon as possible." From then on, Nawaz, who was now on HT's executive committee, participated in dozens of talks and interviews in which he vehemently promoted the Hizb.

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Dr Nafeez Ahmed is an investigative journalist, bestselling author and international security scholar. A former Guardian writer, he writes the 'System Shift' column for VICE's Motherboard, and is also a columnist for Middle East Eye. He is the winner of a 2015 Project Censored Award for Outstanding Investigative Journalism for his Guardian work.

Nafeez has also written for The Independent, Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, The Scotsman, Foreign Policy, The Atlantic, Quartz, Prospect, New (more...)
 

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