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OpEdNews Op Eds    H4'ed 8/17/14

(Sunday Homily) Jesus Comes Very Close to Rejecting a Palestinian Woman as an Unworthy "B_tch"

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Readings for the 20th Sunday in Ordinary Time: IS 56:1, 6-7; PS 67: 2-3, 5, 6, 8; ROM 11: 13-15, 20-32; MT 15: 21-28.

"Have pity on me, Lord, Son of David! My daughter is tormented by a demon." Those are the words that a woman remembered as "Syrophonecian" addressed to Jesus in today's gospel reading.

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Jesus responds by ignoring the woman at first and then by disrespectfully associating his petitioner with dogs -- almost calling her a "b_tch."

We'll come back to that in a moment.

For now note that "Syrophonecian" meant the woman was not a Jew. She was a native or inhabitant of Phoenicia when it was part of the Roman province of Syria. She was living near the twin cities of Tyre and Sidon -- a gentile or non-Jewish region of the Fertile Crescent where Matthew takes trouble to locate today's episode.

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That would have made Jesus' petitioner what we call a "Palestinian" today. In other words, Matthew's geographical note serves to remind us that the Jews never controlled all of their "Promised Land." Instead, they always had to share it with "Palestinians" including Canaanites, Hittites, Amorites, Perizzites, Hivites, Jebusites, Geshurites, Maacaathites, and Philistines.

That in itself is significant in the light of Israel's ongoing brutal war of extermination against Palestinians. There the State of Israel (with supporters often invoking biblical precedent) has adopted the one-state position that is bent claiming all of Palestine for itself. It relegates Palestinians to Bantustans in a particularly brutal Israeli version of apartheid and ethnic cleansing.

Were Jesus in Gaza today, millions of Palestinian parents could echo the poor mother's petition in today's' gospel selection, "Have pity on me, Lord, Son of David! My daughter is tormented by a demon." And the demon in Gaza's case would be the State of Israel itself -- the latest incarnation of the puppets of Empire whom Jesus opposed so strongly in his own day. [Recall that Palestine in Jesus day was controlled by Jewish puppets of Rome. (Jesus clashed with them again and again.) Today those who pull strings on the marionettes reside in Washington.]

The result is that in Gaza over the last five weeks, more than 2000 Palestinians have been slaughtered by the ones considering themselves God's "chosen" -- 25% of the victims being children, at least another 25%, women like the one called "Syrophoenician" and her demon-possessed daughter.

Daniel Ortega, the President of Nicaragua, recently applied the term "demon" appropriately. He said, "Prime Minister Netanyahu appears to be possessed by the devil, he needs Pope Francis to exorcise it, to become appeased." Ortega wondered, "Why doesn't anyone condemn or sanction the state of Israel?" In his opinion, Palestine is the victim of "madness" on the part of the Israeli leader, who seeks to "annihilate the Palestinian people." Ortega meant that Israel is "committing genocide" in the Gaza Strip, a crime so "terrible that it is only comparable to the crimes of the Nazis," he said.

You might have been surprised at Jesus' response to the Syrophonecian woman. As I said, at first he gives no reply at all; he ignores the woman completely. If Matthew's account is accurate, in his silence Jesus was showing himself to be captive to his own cultural norms. It was inconceivable in Hellenistic antiquity for a strange woman to directly approach a man the way the woman in this story did. Above all was it so for a gentile woman to directly address a Jewish man. In other words, Jesus' silence was part of his "honor culture."

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But it gets worse. When the woman insists, Jesus implicitly calls her a "b_tch." He says, "I have been sent for the lost children of Israel . . . it is not right to take the food of the children and throw it to the dogs."

The reply seems out of character for Jesus, doesn't it? In fact, such dissonance has led many to reject the saying as inauthentic. Whatever the case, Jesus' reply only echoes the rabbinic saying of the time, "He who eats with idolaters is like one who eats with a dog."

In other words, Jesus' comparison stands in a long line of likening cultural outsiders to animals. Most recently, in the case of Gaza, Ayelet Shaked, a member of the Israeli Parliament, allegedly compared Palestinians like the woman in today's gospel to snakes. She is accused of endorsing the killing of Palestinian women, like the petitioner in the story before us, calling their children not dogs, but "little snakes" worthy only of extermination.

Shaked posted the following quotation on Facebook,

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Mike Rivage-Seul is a liberation theologian and former Roman Catholic priest. Retired in 2014, he taught at Berea College in Kentucky for 40 years where he directed Berea's Peace and Social Justice Studies Program.Mike blogs (more...)
 

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