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OpEdNews Op Eds    H4'ed 3/27/10

Republican Tea Baggers Reliving The Civil War

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Message Bill Hare
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Once the health care bill was passed the Republican-Tea Bag Party reverted to Civil War legal tactics to seek repeal.

In the spirit of the Tea Bag Revolution, Republican attorneys general are involved in class action activity using the tactic of interposition.

This is the same concept propounded by the legendary Senator John C. Calhoun of South Carolina, a doctrine that clashed with that of the founder of the Republican Party, President Abraham Lincoln of Illinois.

When was the last time you heard a Republican refer to The Party of Lincoln? In bygone years the phrase was used repeatedly at Republican Party national conventions and on the campaign trail.

There is a good reason why Republicans have abandoned the phrase. Their spokespersons, in a final desperate bid to defeat health care legislation that would provide coverage to an additional 30 to 32 million more Americans, have used the same argument advanced by the Confederacy in opposition to Abraham Lincoln's federal concept.

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The current use of interposition, which was used broadly the last time when Governor George Wallace of Alabama advanced it as a means of preventing desegregation in his state, is now being articulated in the realm of the federal government mandating purchase of health care policies.

The same party that rushed off to war in Iraq without worrying about the rights of individual citizens when it came to exercising the war power is now upset that Americans will have their freedoms trampled upon if the government holds sway and mandates coverage.

By insisting that this is a power to be exercised by the states, and that to do otherwise involves an infringement of liberty, is no more than the interposition position of John C. Calhoun being applied to a newer fact situation.

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The doctrine of implied powers was advanced early by the longest service chief justice in U.S. history, John Marshall, who took the logical position that the Constitution was a living and breathing document that needed to be interpretively built upon in order to endure.

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Began in the journalism field in hometown of Los Angeles. Started as Sports Editor and Movie Writer at Inglewood Daily News chain after working in sportswriting of high school events at the Los Angeles Examiner.

Received a bachelor's in (more...)
 
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