Send a Tweet
Most Popular Choices
Share on Facebook 25 Share on Twitter 2 Printer Friendly Page More Sharing
Exclusive to OpEdNews:
Life Arts    H2'ed 10/27/19

How We Rich Exclude Ourselves from the Kingdom of God

By       (Page 2 of 3 pages) Become a premium member to see this article and all articles as one long page.
(# of views)   8 comments, In Series: Sunday Homilies for Progressives
Follow Me on Twitter     Message Mike Rivage-Seul
Become a Fan
  (44 fans)

Pharisees in Jesus' time enjoyed similar respect with the common people. Pharisees were religious teachers and textbook examples of conventional morality. They usually did what the one in today's gospel said he did. They kept the law. The Pharisee in today's reading was probably right; chances are he wasn't like most people.

Generally, Pharisees were not greedy, dishonest, or adulterers. Or as their exemplar in Luke put it, he was not like the tax collector alongside him in the Temple. Pharisees gave tithes on all they possessed - to help with Temple upkeep.

On the other hand, tax collectors in Jesus' day were notorious crooks. Like pimps, they were usually despised. Tax collectors were typically dishonest and greedy. They were adulterers too. They took advantage of their power by extorting widows unable to pay in money into paying in kind.

In other words, the Pharisee's prayer was correct on all counts.

But we might ask, what about the tax collector's prayer: "O God, be merciful to me, a sinner?" A beautiful prayer, no?

Don't be so quick to say "yes."

Notice that this tax collector doesn't repent. He doesn't say, like the tax collector Zacchaeus in Luke's very next chapter, "Look, half of my possessions, Lord, I will give to the poor; and if I have defrauded anyone of anything, I will pay back four times as much (LK 19:8). There is no sign of repentance or of willingness to change his profession on the part of this particular crook.

And yet Jesus concludes his parable by saying: "I tell you, the latter (i.e. the tax collector) went home justified, not the former. . ." Why?

I think the rest of today's liturgy of the word supplies an answer. Each reading is about God's partiality towards the poor, oppressed, orphans, widows and the lowly - those who need God's special protection, because the culture at large tends to write them off or ignore them. Typically, they're the ones conventionality classifies as deviant. The Jewish morality of Jesus time called them all "unclean."

However, all of them - even the worst - were especially dear to Jesus' heart. And this not because they were "virtuous," but simply because of their social location. Elsewhere, Jesus specifically includes tax collectors (and prostitutes) in that group. In MT 21: 38-42, he tells the Pharisees, "Prostitutes and tax collectors will enter God's Kingdom before you religious professionals."

But why would a good person like the Pharisee be excluded from God's Kingdom? Does God somehow bar his entry? I don't think so. God's Kingdom is for everyone.

Rather it was because men like the Pharisee in the temple don't really want to enter that place of GREAT REVERSAL, where the first are last, the rich are poor, the poor are rich, and where (as I said) prostitutes and tax collectors are rewarded.

The Pharisee excludes himself! In fact, the temple's holy people wanted nothing to do with the people they considered "unclean." In other words, it was impossible for Pharisees and the Temple Establishment to conceive of a Kingdom open to the unclean. And even if there was such a Kingdom, these purists didn't want to be there.

Let's put that in terms we can understand in our culture.

Usually rich white people don't want to live next door to poor people or in the same neighborhood with people of color - especially if those in question aren't rich like them.

Imagine God's Kingdom in terms of the ghetto, the barrio or favela. Rich white people don't want to be there.

Next Page  1  |  2  |  3

 

Must Read 2   Well Said 2   Valuable 2  
Rate It | View Ratings

Mike Rivage-Seul Social Media Pages: Facebook Page       Twitter Page       Linkedin page url on login Profile not filled in       Instagram page url on login Profile not filled in

Mike Rivage-Seul is a liberation theologian and former Roman Catholic priest. Retired in 2014, he taught at Berea College in Kentucky for 40 years where he directed Berea's Peace and Social Justice Studies Program.Mike blogs (more...)
 

Go To Commenting
The views expressed herein are the sole responsibility of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of this website or its editors.
Follow Me on Twitter     Writers Guidelines
Contact AuthorContact Author Contact EditorContact Editor Author PageView Authors' Articles
Support OpEdNews

OpEdNews depends upon can't survive without your help.

If you value this article and the work of OpEdNews, please either Donate or Purchase a premium membership.

STAY IN THE KNOW
If you've enjoyed this, sign up for our daily or weekly newsletter to get lots of great progressive content.
Daily Weekly     OpEdNews Newsletter
Name
Email
   (Opens new browser window)
 

Most Popular Articles by this Author:     (View All Most Popular Articles by this Author)

Sunday Homily: Pope Francis to Women: The Next Pope Should Be One of You!

The Case for and Intimate Relationship between Jesus and Mary Magdalene

"Cloud Atlas": A Film for the Ages (But perhaps not for ours)

Muhammad as Liberationist Prophet (Pt. 2 of 4 on Islam as Liberation Theology)

What You Don't Know About Cuba Tells You About YOUR Future

Sunday Homily: Pope Francis' New Song -- Seven Things You May Have Missed in 'The Joy of the Gospel'

To View Comments or Join the Conversation: