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Why US fracking companies are licking their lips over Ukraine

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Source: The Guardian

From climate change to Crimea, the natural gas industry is supreme at exploiting crisis for private gain -- what I call the shock doctrine

Fracking in a Colorado valley
A large field of fracking sites in a Colorado valley. 'The industry's singular solution to the climate crisis is to dramatically expand an extraction process that releases massive amounts of climate-destabilizing methane.'
(image by Photograph: Ted Wood/Aurora Photos/Corbis)


The way to beat Vladimir Putin is to flood the European market with fracked-in-the-USA natural gas, or so the industry would have us believe. As part of escalating anti-Russian hysteria, two bills have been introduced into the US Congress -- one in the House of Representatives (H.R.6), one in the Senate (S.2083) -- that attempt to fast-track liquefied natural gas (LNG) exports, all in the name of helping Europe to wean itself from Putin's fossil fuels, and enhancing US national security.

According to Cory Gardner, the Republican congressman who introduced the House bill, "opposing this legislation is like hanging up on a 911 call from our friends and allies." And that might be true -- as long as your friends and allies work at Chevron and Shell, and the emergency is the need to keep profits up amid dwindling supplies of conventional oil and gas.

For this ploy to work, it's important not to look too closely at details. Like the fact that much of the gas probably won't make it to Europe -- because what the bills allow is for gas to be sold on the world market to any country belonging to the World Trade Organization.

Or the fact that for years the industry has been selling the message that Americans must accept the risks to their land, water and air that come with hydraulic fracturing (fracking) in order to help their country achieve "energy independence." And now, suddenly and slyly, the goal has been switched to "energy security," which apparently means selling a temporary glut of fracked gas on the world market, thereby creating energy dependencies abroad.

And most of all, it's important not to notice that building the infrastructure necessary to export gas on this scale would take many years in permitting and construction -- a single LNG terminal can carry a $7bn price tag, must be fed by a massive, interlocking web of pipelines and compressor stations, and requires its own power plant just to generate energy sufficient to liquefy the gas through super-cooling. By the time these massive industrial projects are up and running, Germany and Russia may well be fast friends. But by then few will remember that the crisis in Crimea was the excuse seized upon by the gas industry to make its longstanding export dreams come true, regardless of the consequences to the communities getting fracked or to the planet getting cooked.

I call this knack for exploiting crisis for private gain the shock doctrine, and it shows no signs of retreating. We all know how the shock doctrine works: during times of crisis, whether real or manufactured, our elites are able to ram through unpopular policies that are detrimental to the majority under cover of emergency. Sure there are objections -- from climate scientists warning of the potent warming powers of methane, or local communities that don't want these high-risk export ports on their beloved coasts. But who has time for debate? It's an emergency! A 911 call ringing! Pass the laws first, think about them later.

Plenty of industries are good at this ploy, but none is more adept at exploiting the rationality-arresting properties of crisis than the global gas sector.

For the past four years the gas lobby has used the economic crisis in Europe to tell countries like Greece that the way out of debt and desperation is to open their beautiful and fragile seas to drilling. And it has employed similar arguments to rationalise fracking across North America and the United Kingdom.

Now the crisis du jour is conflict in Ukraine, being used as a battering ram to knock down sensible restrictions on natural gas exports and push through a controversial free-trade deal with Europe. It's quite a deal: more corporate free-trade polluting economies and more heat-trapping gases polluting the atmosphere -- all as a response to an energy crisis that is largely manufactured.

Against this backdrop it's worth remembering -- irony of ironies -- that the crisis the natural gas industry has been most adept at exploiting is climate change itself.

Never mind that the industry's singular solution to the climate crisis is to dramatically expand an extraction process in fracking that releases massive amounts of climate-destabilising methane into our atmosphere. Methane is one of the most potent greenhouse gases -- 34 times more powerful at trapping heat than carbon dioxide, according to the latest estimates by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. And that is over a 100-year period, with methane's power dwindling over time.

It's far more relevant, argues the Cornell University biochemist Robert Howarth, one of the world's leading experts on methane emissions, to look at the impact in the 15- to 20-year range, when methane has a global-warming potential that is a staggering 86-100 times greater than carbon dioxide. "It is in this time frame that we risk locking ourselves into very rapid warming," he said on Wednesday.

And remember: you don't build multibillion-dollar pieces of infrastructure unless you plan on using them for at least 40 years. So we are responding to the crisis of our warming planet by constructing a network of ultra-powerful atmospheric ovens. Are we mad?

Not that we know how much methane is actually released by drilling and fracking and all their attendant infrastructure. Even while the natural gas industry touts its "lower than coal!" carbon dioxide emissions, it has never systematically measured its fugitive methane leaks, which waft from every stage of the gas extraction, processing, and distribution process -- from the well casings and the condenser valves to the cracked pipelines under Harlem neighborhoods. The gas industry itself, in 1981, came up with the clever pitch that natural gas was a "bridge" to a clean energy future. That was 33 years ago. Long bridge. And the far bank still nowhere in view.

And in 1988 -- the year that the climatologist James Hansen warned Congress, in historic testimony, about the urgent problem of global warming -- the American Gas Association began to explicitly frame its product as a response to the "greenhouse effect." It wasted no time, in other words, selling itself as the solution to a global crisis that it had helped create.

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http://www.naomiklein.org

Naomi Klein is the author of The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism, now out in paperback. To read all her latest writing visit www.naomiklein.org

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Exceedingly well written and well supported. Grea... by Charles Roll on Saturday, Apr 12, 2014 at 3:19:35 PM
One of the problems in opposing fracking is the pu... by Mary Wentworth on Saturday, Apr 12, 2014 at 3:23:59 PM
Workers do need jobs but why don't their union le... by Charles Roll on Saturday, Apr 12, 2014 at 4:00:22 PM
The oil & gas industry achilles heel is the S... by Harry Lord on Saturday, Apr 12, 2014 at 4:01:49 PM
Brilliant, as usual. This needs WAY more coverage.... by Amy Fried, Ph.D. on Saturday, Apr 12, 2014 at 4:58:35 PM
One way to keep us out of the fracking business i... by Pal Palsimon on Sunday, Apr 13, 2014 at 12:29:12 AM
Until the money is out, you will never see Sanders... by Doc McCoy on Sunday, Apr 13, 2014 at 1:45:57 AM
Unless people like you and me and millions of othe... by Pal Palsimon on Sunday, Apr 13, 2014 at 3:34:52 AM
Pool Pensions threatened with depletion, millions... by Pal Palsimon on Sunday, Apr 13, 2014 at 3:42:25 AM
If it wasn't about property rights, tobacco compan... by Pal Palsimon on Sunday, Apr 13, 2014 at 3:48:41 AM