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Usurious Returns on Phantom Money: The Credit Card Gravy Train

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(Article changed on February 15, 2014 at 14:00)

                           
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The credit card business is now the most lucrative part of the banking industry, and it's not just from the interest. It's the hidden fees.

You pay off your credit card balance every month, thinking you are taking advantage of the "interest-free grace period" and getting free credit. You may even use your credit card when you could have used cash, just to get the free frequent flier or cash-back rewards. But those popular features are misleading. Even when the balance is paid on time every month, credit card use imposes a huge hidden cost on users--hidden because the cost is deducted from what the merchant receives, then passed on to you in the form of higher prices.

Visa and MasterCard charge merchants about 2% of the value of every credit card transaction, and American Express charges even more. That may not sound like much. But consider that for balances that are paid off monthly (meaning most of them), the banks make 2% or more on a loan averaging only about 25 days (depending on when in the month the charge was made and when in the grace period it was paid). Two percent interest for 25 days works out to a 33.5% return annually (1.02^(365/25) -- 1), and that figure may be conservative .

Merchant fees were originally designed as a way to avoid usury and Truth-in-Lending laws. Visa and MasterCard are independent entities, but they were set up by big Wall Street banks, and the card-issuing banks get about 80% of the fees. The annual returns not only fall in the usurious category, but they are returns on other people's money -- usually the borrower's own money!     Here is how it works . . . .

The Ultimate Shell Game

Economist Hyman Minsky observed that anyone can create money; the trick is to get it accepted. The function of the credit card company is to turn your IOU, or promise to pay, into a "negotiable instrument" acceptable in the payment of debt. A negotiable instrument is anything that is signed and convertible into money or that can be used as money.

Under Article 9 of the Uniform Commercial Code, when you sign the merchant's credit card charge receipt, you are creating a "negotiable instrument or other writing which evidences a right to the payment of money." This negotiable instrument is deposited electronically into the merchant's checking account, a special account required of all businesses that accept credit.  The account goes up by the amount on the receipt, indicating that the merchant has been paid.  The charge receipt is forwarded to an "acquiring settlement bank," which bundles your charges and sends them to your own bank. Your bank then sends you a statement and you pay the balance with a check, causing your transaction account to be debited at your bank.

The net effect is that your charge receipt (a negotiable instrument) has become an "asset" against which credit has been advanced.  The bank has simply monetized your IOU, turning it into money.  The credit cycle is so short that this process can occur without the bank's own money even being involved . Debits and credits are just shuffled back and forth between accounts.

Timothy Madden is a Canadian financial analyst who built software models of credit card accounts in the early 1990s. In personal correspondence, he estimates that payouts from the bank's own reserves are necessary only about 2% of the time; and the 2% merchant's fee is sufficient to cover these occasions. The "reserves" necessary to back the short-term advances are thus built into the payments themselves, without drawing from anywhere else.

As for the interest, Madden maintains:

The interest is all gravy because the transactions are funded in fact by the signed payment voucher issued by the card-user at the point of purchase. Assume that the monthly gross sales that are run through credit/charge-cards globally double, from the normal $300 billion to $600 billion for the year-end holiday period. The card companies do not have to worry about where the extra $300 billion will come from because it is provided by the additional $300 billion of signed vouchers themselves. . . .

That is also why virtually all  banks  everywhere have to write-off 100% of credit/charge-card accounts in arrears for 180 days. The basic design of the system recognizes that, once set in motion, the system is entirely self-financing requiring zero equity investment by the operator . . . . The losses cannot be charged off against the operator's equity because they don't have any. In the early 1990's when I was building computer/software models of the credit/charge-card system, my spreadsheets kept "blowing up" because of "divide by zero" errors in my return-on-equity display.

A Private Sales Tax

All this sheds light on why the credit card business has become the most lucrative pursuit of the banking industry. At one time, banking was all about taking deposits and making commercial and residential loans. But in recent years, according to the Federal Reserve, "credit card earnings have been almost always higher than returns on all commercial bank activities."

Partly, this is because the interest charged on credit card debt is higher than on other commercial loans. But it is on the fees that the banks really make their money. There are late payment fees, fees for exceeding the credit limit, balance transfer fees, cash withdrawal fees, and annual fees, in addition to the very lucrative merchant fees that accrue at the point of sale whether the customer pays his bill or not. The merchant absorbs the fees, and the customers cover the cost with higher prices.

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Ellen Brown is an attorney, president of the Public Banking Institute, author of 12 books including WEB OF DEBT and THE PUBLIC BANK SOLUTION, and a candidate for California treasurer running on a state bank platform. See (more...)
 
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And, do retailers give any premium for cash payme... by Paul Repstock on Saturday, Feb 15, 2014 at 4:16:22 PM
The article got too long so I left this part out... by Ellen Brown on Saturday, Feb 15, 2014 at 8:17:37 PM
Sellers could get out of the hole by splitting th... by Paul Easton on Sunday, Feb 16, 2014 at 11:00:58 AM
Debit cards? My understanding is that a debit car... by Ken Wertz on Sunday, Feb 16, 2014 at 3:46:17 PM
Great eye-opening article.  I see my local gr... by Steve Hudson on Sunday, Feb 16, 2014 at 9:02:39 AM
Seems like an anti-trust issue. Price gouging, coe... by Bob Davey on Sunday, Feb 16, 2014 at 11:43:44 AM
It used to be anti-trust. That idea is quaint in t... by Hosea McAdoo on Tuesday, Feb 18, 2014 at 2:40:10 AM
And here I thought I was doing a good thing by pa... by 911TRUTH on Sunday, Feb 16, 2014 at 11:55:50 AM
Money is what can be used to buy things. Histori... by Lance Brofman on Sunday, Feb 16, 2014 at 12:38:13 PM
 The mafia has changed. We now call them ban... by Hosea McAdoo on Tuesday, Feb 18, 2014 at 2:37:13 AM