by dkos
attribution: None Specified
A leaking tank floats down the river living an oil slick behind it.

by dkos
From an email.
I see you've noticed the underwater wells in Weld County, Colorado. Amazing; we've emailed the Denver TV stations, other media, and state and local politicians. We've sent pictures that our members have taken. It's like the media and politicians have been TOLD not to say anything about it. There has been no mention of the gas wells on the Denver newscasts either last night or this evening although all stations have had extensive and extended flood coverage. You can see underwater wells in the background of some of the newscast videos, and yet the reporters say absolutely nothing.

Here's a picture one of our members took yesterday in Weld County, Colorado. We've got tons more on our website. Check it out. The tanks are tipping and, in some cases, have fallen over. They have to be leaking toxins into the flood waters. There have to be hundreds if not thousands of underwater well pads in Weld County as a result of the flooding.

Please publicize this in Texas since our media people and politicians have gone silent!

https://www.facebook.com/...

East Boulder County United
Lafayette, Colorado

Update: People living in Weld County contacted me a few minutes ago and they are now receiving many press calls about the underwater, leaking oil and gas facilities.

Citizen journalism works!

Another Update: There are quite a few photos HERE. One photo shows another tank that has tipped over. Another photo shows what the author says is a fracking chemical warehouse that flooded.

And Another Update From the Daily Camera:

Regulators say they agree these well sites could pose a contamination risk, and they will get out to assess the damage as soon as it's feasible.

[...]

Lafayette-based anti-fracking activist Cliff Willmeng said he spent two days "zig-zagging" across Weld and Boulder counties documenting flooded drilling sites, mostly along the drainageway of the St. Vrain River. He observed "hundreds" of wells that were inundated. He also saw many condensate tanks that hold waste material from fracking at odd angles or even overturned.

"It's clear that the density of the oil and gas activity there did not respect where the water would go," Willmeng said. "What we immediately need to know is what is leaking and we need a full detailed report of what that is. This is washing across agricultural land and into the waterways. Now we have to discuss what type of exposure the human population is going to have to suffer through."

A spokesman for the Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission said the agency is aware of the potential for contamination from flooded drilling sites, but there simply is no way to get to those sites while flooding is ongoing and while resources are concentrated on saving lives.