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The Nightmare Scenario: A Repo Implosion

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opednews.com Headlined to H2 10/11/13

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Source: CounterPunch


President Barack Obama is determined to prevail in his battle with GOP congressional leaders on the debt ceiling issue, but not for the reasons stated in the media. Obama is less concerned with the prospect of higher interest rates and frustrated bondholders than he is with the big Wall Street banks who would be thrust back into crisis if there is no resolution before October 17. Absent a debt ceiling deal, the repurchase market -- known as repo -- would undergo another deep-freeze as it did in 2008 when Lehman Brothers defaulted triggering a run on the Reserve Primary Fund which had been exposed to Lehman's short-term debt. 

The frenzied sell-off sparked a widespread panic across global financial markets pushing the system to the brink of collapse and forcing the Federal Reserve to backstop regulated and unregulated financial institutions with more than $11 trillion in loans and other obligations. The same tragedy will play out again, if congress fails lift the ceiling and reinforce the present value of US debt.

Repo is at the heart of the shadow banking system, that opaque off-balance sheet underworld where maturity transformation and other risky banking activities take place beyond the watchful eye of government regulators. It is where banks exchange collateralized securities for short-term loans from investors, mainly large financial institutions. The banks use these loans to fund their other investments boosting their leverage many times over to maximize their profits. 

The so-called congressional reforms, like Dodd Frank, which were ratified after the crisis, have done nothing to change the basic structure of the market or to reign in excessive risk-taking by under-capitalized speculators. The system is as wobbly and crisis-prone ever, as the debt ceiling fiasco suggests. The situation speaks to the impressive power of the bank cartel and their army of lawyers and lobbyists. They own Capital Hill, the White House, and most of the judges in the country. The system remains the same, because that's the way they like it.

US Treasuries provide the bulk of collateral the banks use in acquiring their short-term funding. If the US defaults on its debt, the value that collateral would fall precipitously leaving much of the banking system either underwater or dangerously under-capitalized. The wholesale funding market would grind to a halt, and interbank lending would slow to a crawl. The financial system would suffer its second major heart attack in less than a decade. This is from American Banker:

"As banking policy analyst Karen Shaw Petrou describes it, Treasury obligations are the 'water' in the financial system's plumbing.

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"'They're the global reserve currency and they are perceived to be the most secure thing you can own,' said Petrou, managing partner of Federal Financial Analytics. 'That is why it is pledged as collateral. ... The very biggest banks fear that a debt ceiling breach breaks the pipes.'"

"Rob Toomey, managing director and associate general counsel at the Securities Industry and Financial Markets Association, said institutions are concerned about whether Treasury bonds that default are no longer transferable between market participants.

"'Essentially, whatever the size is of the obligation that Treasury is unable to pay, that kind of liquidity would just disappear from the market for whatever time the payment is not made,' Toomey said."

By some estimates, the amount of liquidity that would be drained from the system immediately following a default would be roughly $600 billion, enough to require emergency action by either the Fed or the US Treasury. Despite post-crisis legislation that forbids future bailouts, the government would surely ride to rescue committing taxpayer revenues once again to save Wall Street.

Keep in mind, the US government does not have to default on its debt to trigger a panic in the credit markets. Changing expectations can easily produce the same result. If the holders of US Treasuries (USTs) begin to doubt that the debt ceiling issue will be resolved, then they'll sell their bonds prematurely to avoid greater losses. That, in turn, will push up interest rates which will strangle the recovery, slow growth, and throw a wrench in the repo market credit engine. We saw an example of how this works in late May when the Fed announced its decision to scale-back its asset purchase. The fact that the Fed continued to buy the same amount of USTs and mortgage-backed securities (MBS) didn't stem the sell-off. Long-term rates went up anyway. Why? Because expectations changed and the market reset prices. That same phenom could happen now, in fact, it is happening now. The Financial Times reported on Wednesday that "Fidelity Investments, the largest manager of money market funds" had sold all of its holdings of US Treasury bills due to mature towards the end of October as a "precautionary measure."

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This is what happens when people start to doubt that US Treasuries will be liquid cash equivalents in the future. They ditch them. And when they ditch them, rates go up and the economy slips into low gear. (Note: "China and Japan together hold more than $2.4 trillion in U.S. Treasuries" Bloomberg)

Now the media has been trying to soft-peddle the implications of the debt ceiling standoff by saying, "No one thinks that holders of USTs won't get repaid."

While this is true, it's also irrelevant. The reason that USTs are the gold standard of financial assets, is because they are considered risk-free and liquid. That's it. If you have to wait to get your money, then the asset you purchased is not completely liquid, right?

And if there is some doubt, however small, that you will not be repaid in full, then the asset is not really risk free, right?

This is what the Fidelity flap is all about. It's about the erosion of confidence in US debt. It's about that sliver of doubt that has entered the minds of investors and changed their behavior. This is a significant development because it means that people in positions of power are now questioning the stewardship of the present system. And  that trend is going to intensify when the Fed begins to reduce its asset purchases later in the year, because winding down QE will precipitate more capital flight, more currency volatility and more emerging market runaway inflation. That's going to lead to more chin scratching, more grousing and more resistance to US stewardship of the system. None of this bodes well for Washington's imperial aspirations or for the world's reserve currency, both of which appear to be living on borrowed time.

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Mike is a freelance writer living in Washington state.

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Is it time to put money into silver?  I know ... by Michael Dewey on Saturday, Oct 12, 2013 at 10:37:44 AM
Well said.  And since we the people are still... by Ernie Messerschmidt on Saturday, Oct 12, 2013 at 10:47:20 AM
I am sick and tired of all the borrowing of worthl... by Bill Johnson on Saturday, Oct 12, 2013 at 11:03:37 AM
I think that the Public State Banks Ernie talked o... by Michael Dewey on Saturday, Oct 12, 2013 at 12:01:20 PM
Republicans are no better than Democrats Bill. I h... by Bob Gormley on Saturday, Oct 12, 2013 at 1:54:50 PM
Sure, keep the government closed perpetually, rene... by Robert S. Becker on Sunday, Oct 13, 2013 at 6:21:21 PM
I love Mike Whitney, his analysis in general, this... by Alan MacDonald on Saturday, Oct 12, 2013 at 1:10:54 PM
I don't know finance.  But I feel we have an ... by John-Albert Eadie on Saturday, Oct 12, 2013 at 6:41:20 PM