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The Lie of the Conservative Batman

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opednews.com Headlined to H4 7/28/12

I've waited a week to post this until enough people have had a chance to see the latest Dark Knight movie, but it bears mentioning: MASSIVE SPOILERS AHEAD!

The Batman mythos runs so deep in our culture that parallels are all-too-easy to find. Claims now run rampant that the latest brilliant installment of Christopher Nolan's Dark Knight trilogy is anti-Occupy or pro-capitalist in sentiment. That it purports 'only a billionaire' can save us. Chris Nolan has dispelled as much, though it's not unreasonable to suggest that the phenomenally successful series may be inexorably linked to current events, as no writer or director creates in a vacuum, and both life imitates art and art imitates life. All films reflect their times, and the Batman is no exception. The imagery itself has seeped into everyday usage, (much like the protagonist masks in V for Vendetta), the war-painted Joker has been used by protest movements to vilify seemingly every elite from Bernie Madoff to president Barack Obama. Even without the gadgetry, moral code, genius-level detective skills, martial arts, cape or cowl, many billionaires see themselves as crucial heroes, their "sacrifices" necessary for the good of the system. And yes, the probably psychopathic James Holmes seems unable or unwilling to separate reality from fiction, modeling himself after The Dark Knight's villainous Joker (portrayed inimitably by Heath Ledger).

But Christopher Nolan's version of the Batman (dubbed the Nolanverse), had already established an old Gotham rife with political corruption, a recession predating our own by a few years (Batman Begins began in 2005), the excesses of the rich and inequity of their system, and the thievery of Wall Street.

The script for The Dark Knight Rises was written during 2010, with location scouting happening in December of that year. Filming ran from May to November 2011, overlapping the rise of the Occupy movement by mere months. Any similarity is purely coincidental, and furthermore seen through the lens of Fox news analysis and FBI entrapment, where Occupiers have already been condemned as criminals and terrorists. The predominant Beltway philosophy already has established the 'infallible rich' as a cornerstone of its power structure.

And the story of haves and have-nots is as old as time anyway, as The Dark Knight Rises draws heavily from A Tale of Two Cities and its historical Red Terror. It's a false dichotomy (which many pundits love) that one cannot have both a healthy opposition to violent revolution and sympathetic support for a protest movement. It really reveals more about the claimants' ideology than anything else. Charles Dickens, for one, cared deeply for the plight of the poor, but not for the brutal atrocities of the French Revolution.

We humans will ascribe our own meaning and see what we want in film and comic book escapism, no matter how earnest the telling. This trilogy simply rings true because it dissects the hard ideological differences regarding justice, evil, truth, responsibility, and just exactly who is the real psychopath, anyway. We can all too easily see the divides and overlapping philosophies of the Occupy movement, the police force, the rich elites, and the League of Shadows. And yes, both lone vigilantes and lone nuts.

But even if the movie were a direct allegory to our failed structure, it could hardly be seen as a conservative endorsement, as bloggers on both sides have contended. More likely, the chilling dystopian vision of a city torn into a No Man's Land reads as a warning against radical demagoguery and institutional deception. And though some may not agree with the aims of the Occupy movement, it takes a willfully ignorant or forcefully disingenuous mindset to equate them with the insane philosophy of either a chaotically sadistic Joker or a frighteningly focused and cold-blooded Bane (portrayed by Tom Hardy).

Indeed, Occupy remains a leaderless movement, constantly worrying about being co-opted by self-interested parties. Bane adopts a populist message in order to peddle false hopes to the citizenry he hopes to torture, populating his army with liberated thieves and killers. Yes, and there are those whom society has forsaken. Bane's armed revolt plays to the same paranoid fears of Fox News and the State Department, and the same rhetoric of a much less radical Anonymous; it is made up of janitors, shoe-shiners, orphans, ex-cons, sanitation and construction workers. The under-served.

Bruce Wayne's (reprised by Christian Bale) sins are spelled out for us at the beginning of The Dark Knight Rises. Not only has he taken the fall for the crimes of Harvey Dent (Aaron Eckhart) and conspired to propagate a political lie, he has turned his back on society and the world. The streets have become relatively clean without him in the eight years since he donned the cowl, but the less obvious ills of a broken system still endure as Bruce neglects the city he loves, and literally atrophies in his elegantly rebuilt mansion.

Gotham's sins are also many, where betrayal and lies are common political practice, where war heros are expendable during peacetime, where critical-thinking police are discounted as 'hotheads', and where even good men like Jim Gordon (Gary Oldman) get their hands filthy. The Batman himself, as the Force-ghost of Ra's Al-Ghul (Liam Neeson) reminds us, "for years fought the decadence of Gotham with his moral authority... and the most he could achieve was a lie." The overreaching Dent Act, based on Jim Gordon and Bruce Wayne's falsehood, has robbed the imprisoned of any chance of parole. And though it was (hurriedly) agreed that if they world knew of Harvey Dent's crimes, the guilty would be opened up to appeal, it is this very act of conspiracy that threatens to help blow apart the system, once finally discovered. The career politicians, police bosses, day traders and rich elite are anything but sympathetic figures.

Selena Kyle (Anne Hathaway) is the only decent representative of the 99%. She (as well as her politics and moral code) is adaptable, values anonymity, and flaunts authority. She embodies the 'honor among thieves' adage, she is generous, and sees herself as somewhat of a Robin Hood, at least more than the society types she robs from, who 'take so much and leave so little for the rest.' However, she is equally horrified, frightened and disgusted by the madness that ensues during Bane's "revolution."

John Daggett (Ben Mendelsohn), on the other hand, is your stereotypical corporate vulture, a literal blood diamond opportunist looking for his next hostile takeover, who doesn't have time for "save-the-world vanity projects." In fact, Daggett doesn't care if the world is destroyed with his help, so long as he acquires more money and the "power it buys." It is the likes of Daggett and the other one-dimensional capitalists who worship the status quo when it suits them, later colluding with criminals on the side. Daggett only sees Bane as 'pure evil' once he realizes the imminent threat to himself and his riches; once it's no longer himself who's in charge. It should be noted that there are no real-life Occupy figures who could cow a crooked billionaire by placing a hand on their shoulder like an alpha dominant.

But of course these unsympathetic crooks are surely served up as contrast to our hero: the billionaire who would save us.

And though the Batman/Bruce Wayne may be heralded as the authoritarian's dream; willing to employ mass surveillance and extreme rendition, and solely deciding what technology the people deserve and can be trusted with, he is no Randian Superman. He is not a billionaire's billionaire, for though he has more cars than cares to count, has never answered his own door, and "doesn't even go broke like the rest of us," he is also easily displaced within his own boardroom, decries the egotistical hypocrisy of charity balls, and has not been watching his own money carefully. Notably, he wants to fail. He relishes the opportunity to be destroyed as the Batman, if it means saving the lives of everyone; the rich, the workers and the poor alike.

Neither, however, has he been serving his own people and city of late, trading in his once rich playboy identity for a Howard Hughes shtick. Not only is his corporation floundering, his beloved charitable foundation is practically defunct. Orphaned boys age out of Gotham's social programs, neglected by a city with no homes of jobs available. Here they become easy prey for vaguely Middle Eastern terrorists and organized criminals, where they die in the sewers and wash away once they are used up.

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http://www.breshvic.wordpress.com

I've been personally blogging for a number of years, as well as aggregating news for the Occupy Student Debt page, the LikelyinStore tumblr (which follows the changing publishing world) and others. I am also in director of the news department of (more...)
 

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The Lie of the Conservative Batman

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The Batman is against guns and killing, further ev... by Breshvic Penicillin on Saturday, Jul 28, 2012 at 10:48:12 AM
I was going to write a rebuttal to Scott Baker's p... by J. Edward Tremlett on Sunday, Jul 29, 2012 at 1:18:15 PM
Thanks for the praise! I appreciate feedback. Feel... by Breshvic Penicillin on Sunday, Jul 29, 2012 at 9:35:02 PM