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The Hijacking Of Mandela's Legacy

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Source: RT


Nelson Mandela
(image by (Reuters))


Beware of strangers bearing gifts. The "gift" is the ongoing, frantic canonization of Nelson Mandela. The "strangers" are the 0.0001 percent, that fraction of the global elite that's really in control (media naturally included).

It's a Tower of Babel of tributes piled up in layer upon layer of hypocrisy -- from the US to Israel and from France to Britain.

What must absolutely be buried under the tower is that the apartheid regime in South Africa was sponsored and avidly defended by the West until, literally, it was about to crumble under the weight of its own contradictions. The only thing that had really mattered was South Africa's capitalist economy and immense resources, and the role of Pretoria in fighting "communism." Apartheid was, at best, a nuisance.

Mandela is being allowed sainthood by the 0.0001% because he extended a hand to the white oppressor who kept him in jail for 27 years. And because he accepted -- in the name of "national reconciliation" -- that no apartheid killers would be tried, unlike the Nazis.

Among the cataracts of emotional tributes and the crass marketization of the icon, there's barely a peep in Western corporate media about Mandela's firm refusal to ditch armed struggle against apartheid (if he had done so, he would not have been jailed for 27 years); his gratitude towards Fidel Castro's Cuba -- which always supported the people of Angola, Namibia and South Africa fighting apartheid; and his perennial support for the liberation struggle in Palestine.

Young generations, especially, must not be made aware that during the Cold War, any organization fighting for the freedom of the oppressed in the developing world was dubbed "terrorist"; that was the Cold War version of the "war on terror." Only at the end of the 20th century was the fight against apartheid accepted as a supreme moral cause; and Mandela, of course, rightfully became the universal face of the cause.

It's easy to forget that conservative messiah Ronald Reagan -- who enthusiastically hailed the precursors of al-Qaeda as "freedom fighters" -- fiercely opposed the Comprehensive Anti-Apartheid Act because, what else, the African National Congress (ANC) was considered a "terrorist organization" (on top of Washington branding the ANC as "communists").


Former US Vice President Dick Cheney
(image by (AFP Photo / Saul Loeb))

The same applied to a then-Republican Congressman from Wyoming who later would turn into a Darth Vader replicant, Dick Cheney. As for Israel, it even offered one of its nuclear weapons to the Afrikaners in Pretoria -- presumably to wipe assorted African commies off the map.

In his notorious 1990 visit to the US, now as a free man, Mandela duly praised Fidel, PLO chairman Yasser Arafat and Col. Gaddafi as his "comrades in arms""There is no reason whatsoever why we should have any hesitation about hailing their commitment to human rights." Washington/Wall Street was livid.

And this was Mandela's take, in early 2003, on the by then inevitable invasion of Iraq and the wider war on terror; "If there is a country that has committed unspeakable atrocities in the world, it is the United States of America." No wonder he was kept on the US government terrorist list until as late as 2008.

From terrorism to sainthood

In the early 1960s -- when, by the way, the US itself was practicing apartheid in the South -- it would be hard to predict to what extent "Madiba" (his clan name), the dandy lawyer and lover of boxing with an authoritarian character streak, would adopt Gandhi's non-violence strategy to end up forging an exceptional destiny graphically embodying the political will to transform society. Yet the seeds of "Invictus" were already there.

The fascinating complexity of Mandela is that he was essentially a democratic socialist. Certainly not a capitalist. And not a pacifist either; on the contrary, he would accept violence as a means to an end. In his books and countless speeches, he always admitted his flaws. His soul must be smirking now at all the adulation.

US President Barack Obama (AFP Photo / Brendan Smialovsky)
US President Barack Obama
(image by (AFP Photo / Brendan Smialovsky))

Arguably, without Mandela, Barack Obama would never have reached the White House; he admitted on the record that his first political act was at an anti-apartheid demonstration. But let's make it clear: Mr. Obama, you're no Nelson Mandela.

To summarize an extremely complex process, in the "death throes" of apartheid, the regime was mired in massive corruption, hardcore military spending and with the townships about to explode. Mix Fidel's Cuban fighters kicking the butt of South Africans (supported by the US) in Angola and Namibia with the inability to even repay Western loans, and you have a recipe for bankruptcy.

The best and the brightest in the revolutionary struggle -- like Mandela -- were either in jail, in exile, assassinated (like Steve Biko) or "disappeared," Latin American death squad-style. The actual freedom struggle was mostly outside South Africa -- in Angola, Namibia and the newly liberated Mozambique and Zimbabwe.

Once again, make no mistake; without Cuba -- as Mandela amply stressed writing from jail in March 1988 -- there would be "no liberation of our continent, and my people, from the scourge of apartheid." Now get one of those 0.0001% to admit it.

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Pepe Escobar is the roving correspondent for Asia Times. His regular column, "The Roving Eye," is widely read. He is an analyst for the online news channel Real News, the roving correspondent for Asia Times/Hong Kong, an analyst for RT and (more...)
 
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