Share on Google Plus Share on Twitter
  8
Share on Facebook
  22
Share on LinkedIn Share on PInterest Share on Fark! Share on Reddit
  1
Share on StumbleUpon
  8
Tell A Friend
  26
65 Shares     
Printer Friendly Page Save As Favorite View Favorites View Article Stats
2 comments

General News

Nuclear Perceptions Fight Reality

Become a Fan
  (25 fans)
By (about the author)     Permalink       (Page 1 of 2 pages)
Related Topic(s): ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; (more...) ; ; ; ; ; , Add Tags  (less...) Add to My Group(s)

View Ratings | Rate It

opednews.com

FUKUSHIMA FREAKOUT OBSCURES REAL ACCIDENT THAT GOES ON AND ON

   By William Boardman  Email address removed  

An early morning flurry of internet reports carried scary -- but false -- headlines about Fukushima nuclear power plant's fuel pools exploding and burning, and releasing massive amounts of radiation on October 22.  Many readers expressed skepticism, as the reports seemed to come from a single, unconfirmed source and by later the same afternoon more responsible websites were labeling the story a hoax

The Fukushima accident in Japan continues nonetheless, at a slower pace for now, even though one of the more dangerous damaged units has cracks in its walls and is sinking into the ground, as affirmed by nuclear engineer Arnie Gunderson in his October 21 podcast

Unit 4 at Fukushima is perhaps the most threatening part of the damaged plant because the unit's fuel rods are outside the containment where further mishap could lead to the release massive amounts of radiation directly into the environment. 

At the time of the earthquake in March 2011, about 100 miles of Japan's coastline, including the area around Fukushima, dropped about three feet, increasing the impact of the tsunami that destroyed the nuclear  power plant, which continues to deteriorate. 

In recent weeks it's become increasingly clear that Fukushima Unit 4, with its unprotected fuel rods is continuing to sink into the ground, and is sinking asymmetrically, creating the possibility that the building will begin to tilt.   The unit sank about 36 inches in March 2011 and has sunk another 30 inches since then, as confirmed by Gunderson.

  How Safe Is a Buckled, Sinking Building?

"These buildings are supposed to be seismically and structurally secure and, you know, if the ground sinks under them, that suddenly changes a lot of people's perception," Gunderson said, underscoring the assurances of the nuclear industry that reactors are constructed to survive earthquakes intact.   The Japanese "seismic calculations were wrong all along," he added. 

Unit 4 was first damaged by the earthquake/tsunami event, and then suffered several explosions during the aftermath.  Tokyo Electric (TEPCO) acknowledged that the building was damaged and went in during the spring of 2011 to structurally reinforce the elevated fuel pool, to keep the bottom of the pool from breaking and dumping fuel rods uncontrollably. 

Today the Unit 4 building is buckled, and is two inches wider at the bottom than at the top.   There is at least one crack in its foundation.

Of the four Fukushima reactors and fuel pools, Unit 4 has the most nuclear fuel in the fuel pool, and no fuel in its reactor within the containment.  All the fuel in Unit 4 is outside the relative safety of the containment.  And part of that fuel is the entire hot nuclear core that used to be in the reactor.   That's why the fuel pool steams on colder days. 

"There is dozens of times more Cesium in the nuclear fuel pool at Unit 4 than was ever released in all the above ground [nuclear bomb] testing that ever occurred, so if that pool were to face structural damage from another earthquake, it would likely devastate Japan," Gunderson said, "It's a sleeping dragon." 

He added that until Tepco gets the fuel out of the pool, the world needs to keeps its fingers crossed that there's not another earthquake, because Tepco is moving too slowly and methodically to make the site safe any time soon. 

   Perception of Safety Wins Out Over Reality

As has been widely reported, Tepco has known since 2002 that the Fukushima site was unsafe.  "I actually think they knew in the eighties," Gunderson commented.   One reason TEPCO didn't do anything was money, and another was public relations. 

Next Page  1  |  2

 

Vermonter living in Woodstock: elected to five terms (served 20 years) as side judge (sitting in Superior, Family, and Small Claims Courts); public radio producer, "The Panther Program" -- nationally distributed, three albums (at CD Baby), some (more...)
 
Share on Google Plus Submit to Twitter Add this Page to Facebook! Share on LinkedIn Pin It! Add this Page to Fark! Submit to Reddit Submit to Stumble Upon

The views expressed in this article are the sole responsibility of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of this website or its editors.

Writers Guidelines

Contact Author Contact Editor View Authors' Articles

Most Popular Articles by this Author:     (View All Most Popular Articles by this Author)

Nuclear Perceptions Fight Reality

Fukushima Spiking All of a Sudden

Vermont Asks: "What the Fukushima"?

Fukushima Meltdowns: Global Denial At Work

Military-Industrial Complex Owns Vermont

Accountability in Vermont?

Comments

The time limit for entering new comments on this article has expired.

This limit can be removed. Our paid membership program is designed to give you many benefits, such as removing this time limit. To learn more, please click here.

Comments: Expand   Shrink   Hide  
2 people are discussing this page, with 2 comments
To view all comments:
Expand Comments
(Or you can set your preferences to show all comments, always)

Great article, if I may say so, William. (And I've... by Martin Cohen on Friday, Nov 2, 2012 at 4:13:07 PM
Safety is a drain on profits, not to mention ... by William Boardman on Friday, Nov 2, 2012 at 6:05:35 PM