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Follow the Money: Behind Europe's Debt Crisis Lurks Another Giant Bailout of Wall Street

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Today Ben Bernanke added his voice to those who are worried about Europe's debt crisis.

But why exactly should America be so concerned? Yes, we export to Europe -- but those exports aren't going to dry up. And in any event, they're tiny compared to the size of the U.S. economy.

If you want the real reason, follow the money. A Greek (or Irish or Spanish or Italian or Portugese) default would have roughly the same effect on our financial system as the implosion of Lehman Brothers in 2008.

Financial chaos.

Investors are already getting the scent. Stocks slumped to 13-month low on Monday as investors dumped Wall Street bank shares.

The Street has lent only about $7 billion to Greece, as of the end of last year, according to the Bank for International Settlements. That's no big deal.

But a default by Greece or any other of Europe's debt-burdened nations could easily pummel German and French banks, which have lent Greece (and the other wobbly European countries) far more.

That's where Wall Street comes in. Big Wall Street banks have lent German and French banks a bundle.

The Street's total exposure to the euro zone totals about $2.7 trillion. Its exposure to to France and Germany accounts for nearly half the total.

And it's not just Wall Street's loans to German and French banks that are worrisome. Wall Street has also insured or bet on all sorts of derivatives emanating from Europe -- on energy, currency, interest rates, and foreign exchange swaps. If a German or French bank goes down, the ripple effects are incalculable.

Get it? Follow the money: If Greece goes down, investors start fleeing Ireland, Spain, Italy, and Portugal as well. All of this sends big French and German banks reeling. If one of these banks collapses, or show signs of major strain, Wall Street is in big trouble. Possibly even bigger trouble than it was in after Lehman Brothers went down.

That's why shares of the biggest U.S. banks have been falling for the past month. Morgan Stanley closed Monday at its lowest since December 2008 -- and the cost of insuring Morgan's debt has jumped to levels not seen since November 2008.

It's rumored that Morgan could lose as much as $30 billion if some French and German banks fail. (That's from Federal Financial Institutions Examination Council, which tracks all cross-border exposure of major banks.)

$30 billion is roughly $2 billion more than the assets Morgan owns (in terms of current market capitalization.)

But Morgan says its exposure to French banks is zero. Why the discrepancy? Morgan has probably taken out insurance against its loans to European banks, as well as collateral from them. So Morgan feels as if it's not exposed. 

But does anyone remember something spelled AIG? That was the giant insurance firm that went bust when Wall Street began going under. Wall Street thought it had insured its bets with AIG. Turned out, AIG couldn't pay up.

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http://robertreich.org/

Robert Reich, former U.S. Secretary of Labor and Professor of Public Policy at the University of California at Berkeley, has a new film, "Inequality for All," to be released September 27. He blogs at www.robertreich.org.

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IS IT INDEPENDENCE THAT WE CELEBRATE OR DEPENDEN... by Getem Sity on Wednesday, Oct 5, 2011 at 4:19:10 AM
Coming back from Europe, I've learned that what ev... by crispy on Wednesday, Oct 5, 2011 at 4:15:34 PM
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The thousands who march on Wall Street will become... by Paul from Potomac on Thursday, Oct 6, 2011 at 7:53:21 AM
I can't help snickering about this. I know its no ... by Ginger McClemons on Thursday, Oct 6, 2011 at 3:56:08 PM