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Anonymous Hacktivist Jeremy Hammond's Court Statement Upon Being Sentenced to 10 Years In Jail

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Jeremy Hammond
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jeremy Hammond was sentenced to ten years in prison for hacking Stratfor communications, then releasing the personal account and email info of over 800,000 people, plus the credit card info of 60,000 people. This is his statement. 

Good morning. Thank you for this opportunity. My name is Jeremy Hammond and I'm here to be sentenced for hacking activities carried out during my involvement with Anonymous. I have been locked up at MCC for the past 20 months and have had a lot of time to think about how I would explain my actions.

Before I begin, I want to take a moment to recognize the work of the people who have supported me. I want to thank all the lawyers and others who worked on my case: Elizabeth Fink, Susan Kellman, Sarah Kunstler, Emily Kunstler, Margaret Kunstler, and Grainne O'Neill. I also want to thank the National Lawyers Guild, the Jeremy Hammond Defense Committee and Support Network, Free Anons, the Anonymous Solidarity Network, Anarchist Black Cross, and all others who have helped me by writing a letter of support, sending me letters, attending my court dates, and spreading the word about my case. I also want to shout out my brothers and sisters behind bars and those who are still out there fighting the power.

The acts of civil disobedience and direct action that I am being sentenced for today are in line with the principles of community and equality that have guided my life. I hacked into dozens of high profile corporations and government institutions, understanding very clearly that what I was doing was against the law, and that my actions could land me back in federal prison. But I felt that I had an obligation to use my skills to expose and confront injustice--and to bring the truth to light.

Could I have achieved the same goals through legal means? I have tried everything from voting petitions to peaceful protest and have found that those in power do not want the truth to be exposed. When we speak truth to power we are ignored at best and brutally suppressed at worst. We are confronting a power structure that does not respect its own system of checks and balances, never mind the rights of it's own citizens or the international community.

My introduction to politics was when George W. Bush stole the Presidential election in 2000, then took advantage of the waves of racism and patriotism after 9/11 to launch unprovoked imperialist wars against Iraq and Afghanistan. I took to the streets in protest naively believing our voices would be heard in Washington and we could stop the war. Instead, we were labeled as traitors, beaten, and arrested.

I have been arrested for numerous acts of civil disobedience on the streets of Chicago, but it wasn't until 2005 that I used my computer skills to break the law in political protest. I was arrested by the FBI for hacking into the computer systems of a right-wing, pro-war group called Protest Warrior, an organization that sold racist t-shirts on their website and harassed anti-war groups. I was charged under the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act, and the "intended loss" in my case was arbitrarily calculated by multiplying the 5000 credit cards in Protest Warrior's database by $500, resulting in a total of $2.5 million.My sentencing guidelines were calculated on the basis of this "loss," even though not a single credit card was used or distributed -- by me or anyone else. I was sentenced to two years in prison.

While in prison I have seen for myself the ugly reality of how the criminal justice system destroys the lives of the millions of people held captive behind bars. The experience solidified my opposition to repressive forms of power and the importance of standing up for what you believe.

When I was released, I was eager to continue my involvement in struggles for social change. I didn't want to go back to prison, so I focused on above-ground community organizing. But over time, I became frustrated with the limitations, of peaceful protest, seeing it as reformist and ineffective. The Obama administration continued the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, escalated the use of drones, and failed to close Guantanamo Bay.

Around this time, I was following the work of groups like Wikileaks and Anonymous. It was very inspiring to see the ideas of hactivism coming to fruition. I was particularly moved by the heroic actions of Chelsea Manning, who had exposed the atrocities committed by U.S. forces in Iraq and Afghanistan. She took an enormous personal risk to leak this information -- believing that the public had a right to know and hoping that her disclosures would be a positive step to end these abuses. It is heart-wrenching to hear about her cruel treatment in military lockup.

I thought long and hard about choosing this path again. I had to ask myself, if Chelsea Manning fell into the abysmal nightmare of prison fighting for the truth, could I in good conscience do any less, if I was able? I thought the best way to demonstrate solidarity was to continue the work of exposing and confronting corruption.

I was drawn to Anonymous because I believe in autonomous, decentralized direct action. At the time Anonymous was involved in operations in support of the Arab Spring uprisings, against censorship, and in defense of Wikileaks. I had a lot to contribute, including technical skills, and how to better articulate ideas and goals. It was an exciting time -- the birth of a digital dissent movement, where the definitions and capabilities of hacktivism were being shaped.

I was especially interested in the work of the hackers of LulzSec who were breaking into some significant targets and becoming increasingly political. Around this time, I first started talking to Sabu, who was very open about the hacks he supposedly committed, and was encouraging hackers to unite and attack major government and corporate systems under the banner of Anti Security. But very early in my involvement, the other Lulzsec hackers were arrested, leaving me to break into systems and write press releases. Later, I would learn that Sabu had been the first one arrested, and that the entire time I was talking to him he was an FBI informant.

Anonymous was also involved in the early stages of Occupy Wall Street. I was regularly participating on the streets as part of Occupy Chicago and was very excited to see a worldwide mass movement against the injustices of capitalism and racism. In several short months, the "Occupations" came to an end, closed by police crackdowns and mass arrests of protestors who were kicked out of their own public parks. The repression of Anonymous and the Occupy Movement set the tone for Antisec in the following months -- the majority of our hacks against police targets were in retaliation for the arrests of our comrades.

I targeted law enforcement systems because of the racism and inequality with which the criminal law is enforced. I targeted the manufacturers and distributors of military and police equipment who profit from weaponry used to advance U.S. political and economic interests abroad and to repress people at home. I targeted information security firms because they work in secret to protect government and corporate interests at the expense of individual rights, undermining and discrediting activists, journalists and other truth seekers, and spreading disinformation.

I had never even heard of Stratfor until Sabu brought it to my attention. Sabu was encouraging people to invade systems, and helping to strategize and facilitate attacks. He even provided me with vulnerabilities of targets passed on by other hackers, so it came as a great surprise when I learned that Sabu had been working with the FBI the entire time.

On December 4, 2011, Sabu was approached by another hacker who had already broken into Stratfor's credit card database. Sabu, under the watchful eye of his government handlers, then brought the hack to Antisec by inviting this hacker to our private chatroom, where he supplied download links to the full credit card database as well as the initial vulnerability access point to Stratfor's systems.

I spent some time researching Stratfor and reviewing the information we were given, and decided that their activities and client base made them a deserving target. I did find it ironic that Stratfor's wealthy and powerful customer base had their credit cards used to donate to humanitarian organizations, but my main role in the attack was to retrieve Stratfor's private email spools which is where all the dirty secrets are typically found.

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Jeremy Hammond is a hacktivist sentenced to ten years in prison for hacking into Stratfor, obtaining emails and account info on 860,000 subscribers, including credit card info on 60,000 people. 
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Anonymous Hacktivist Jeremy Hammond's Court Statement Upon Being Sentenced to 10 Years In Jail

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         These young men ... by molly cruz on Saturday, Nov 16, 2013 at 2:35:24 PM
Indeed, we speak of gratitude to those defending o... by Neal Chalabi Chambers on Saturday, Nov 16, 2013 at 6:39:13 PM
I am saddened and outraged by this sentence delibe... by lynn Faulkner on Saturday, Nov 16, 2013 at 3:22:06 PM
Well done Jeremy Hammond. I'm sorry that you were... by Peter Franzen on Saturday, Nov 16, 2013 at 3:34:52 PM
Thanks Jeremy, The population... by Douglas Jack on Saturday, Nov 16, 2013 at 5:55:17 PM
Try saying that from within the ghetto (and soon a... by Neal Chalabi Chambers on Saturday, Nov 16, 2013 at 6:47:01 PM
Neal, Thanks for your reply & comments below i... by Douglas Jack on Saturday, Nov 16, 2013 at 10:41:06 PM
And if I read you right, you are suggesting we fin... by Neal Chalabi Chambers on Monday, Nov 18, 2013 at 12:29:18 AM
Neal, RE: "picking our battles" I join you in appr... by Douglas Jack on Monday, Nov 18, 2013 at 9:25:33 AM
Sadly, the corporate fascistic hierarchy is perpet... by Neal Chalabi Chambers on Tuesday, Nov 19, 2013 at 12:43:20 AM
Looked at your website and I especially like "the ... by Charles Roll on Thursday, Nov 21, 2013 at 6:06:07 AM
Jeremy speaks the truth when he says he was doing ... by Neal Chalabi Chambers on Saturday, Nov 16, 2013 at 6:37:15 PM
Another hero in my Musketeers' Holy War Army ! Ass... by michele mooney on Saturday, Nov 16, 2013 at 7:55:44 PM
The only shocking factor is that Hammond was allow... by Paul Repstock on Saturday, Nov 16, 2013 at 8:57:27 PM
What's surprising is that he is good at speaking.&... by Neal Chalabi Chambers on Monday, Nov 18, 2013 at 12:20:35 AM
I don't know what else to say except thank you and... by frang on Saturday, Nov 16, 2013 at 10:58:41 PM
The U.S. hypes the threat of hackers in order to j... by Michael Dewey on Monday, Nov 18, 2013 at 6:16:52 AM
Speaking of recidivism, it means "repeat offender"... by Jay Farrington on Wednesday, Nov 20, 2013 at 10:12:43 AM