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Powerful Presentations on Fukushima and Nuclear Power

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opednews.com Headlined to H2 10/10/13

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(Article changed on October 10, 2013 at 09:35)


It started this June in California. Speaking about the problems at the troubled San Onofre nuclear plants through the perspective of the Fukushima nuclear complex catastrophe was a panel of Naoto Kan, prime minister of Japan when the disaster began; Gregory Jaczko, chairman of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) at the time; Peter Bradford, an NRC member when the Three Mile Island accident happened; and nuclear engineer and former nuclear industry executive Arnie Gundersen.

This week the same panel of experts on nuclear technology--joined by long-time nuclear opponent Ralph Nader--was on the East Coast, in New York City and Boston, speaking about problems at the problem-riddled Indian Point nuclear plants near New York and the troubled Pilgrim plant near Boston, through the perspective on the Fukushima catastrophe.

Their presentations were powerful.

Kan, at the event Tuesday in Manhattan, told of how he had been a supporter of nuclear power, but after the Fukushima accident, which began on March 11, 2011, "I changed my thinking 180-degrees, completely." He said that in the first days of the accident it looked like an "area that included Tokyo" and populated by 50 million people might have to be evacuated.

   "We do have accidents such as an airplane crash and so on," said Kan, "but no other accident or disaster" other than a nuclear plant disaster can "affect 50 million people...no other accident could cause such a tragedy."

All 54 nuclear plants in Japan have now been closed, Kan said. And "without nuclear power plants we can absolutely provide the energy to meet our demands." Meanwhile, in the two-plus years since the disaster began, Japan has tripled its use of solar energy--a jump in solar power production that is the equivalent of the electricity that would be produced by three nuclear plants, he said. He pointed to Germany as a model in its commitment to shutting down all its nuclear power plants and having "all its power supplied by renewable power" by 2050. The entire world, said Kan, could do this. "If humanity really would work together...we could generate all our energy through renewable energy."

Jaczko said that the Fukushima disaster exploded several myths about nuclear power including those involving the purported prowess of U.S. nuclear technology. The General Electric technology of the Fukushima nuclear plants "came from the U.S.," he noted. And, it exploded the myth that "severe accidents wouldn't happen." Said the former top nuclear official in the United States: "Severe accidents can and will happen."

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And what the Fukushima accident "is telling us is society does not accept the consequences of these accidents," said Jaczko, who was pressured out of his position on the NRC after charging that the agency was not considering the "lessons" of the Fukushima disaster.   In monetary cost alone, Jaczko said, the cost of the Fukushima accident is estimated at $500 billion by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers.

Nuclear engineer Gundersen, formerly a nuclear industry senior vice president, noted that the NRC "says the chance of a nuclear accident is one in a million," that an accident would happen "every 2,500 years." This is predicated, he said, on what the NRC terms a probabilistic   risk assessment or PRA. "I'd like to refer to it as PRAY." The lesson of "real life," said Gundersen, is that there have been five nuclear plant meltdowns in the past 35 years--Three Mile Island in 1979, Chernobyl in 1986 and the three at Fukushima Daiichi complex. That breaks down to an accident "every seven years."

"This is a technology that can have 40 good years that can be wiped out in one bad day," said Gundersen. He drew a parallel between Fukushima Daiichi "120 miles from Tokyo" and the Indian Point nuclear plant complex "26 miles from New York City." He said that "in many ways Indian Point is worse than Fukushima was before the accident."   One element: the Fukushima accident resulted from an earthquake followed by a tsunami. The two operating plants at Indian Point are also adjacent to an earthquake fault, said Gundersen. New York City "faces one bad day like Japan, one sad day." He also spoke of the "arrogance and hubris" of the nuclear industry and how the NRC has consistently complied with the desires of the industry.

Bradford said that that the "the bubble" that the nuclear industry once termed "the nuclear renaissance" has burst. As to a main nuclear industry claim in this promotion to revive nuclear power--that atomic energy is necessary in "mitigating climate change"--this has been shown to be false. It would take tripling of the 440 total of nuclear plants now in the world to reduce greenhouse gasses by but 10 percent. Other sources of power are here as well as energy efficiency that could combat climate change. Meanwhile, the price of electricity from any new nuclear plants built has gone to a non-competitive 12 to 20 cents per kilowatt hour while "renewables are falling in price."

Bradford also sharply criticized the agency of which he was once a member, the NRC, charging among other things that it has in recent years discouraged citizen participation. Also, as to Fukushima, the "accident really isn't over," said Bradford who, in addition to his role at the NRC has chaired the utility commissions of Maine and New York State.

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Nader said that with nuclear power and the radioactivity it produces "we are dealing with a silent cumulative form of violence." He said nuclear power is "unnecessary, unsafe, and uninsurable...undemocratic." And constructing new words that begin with "un," it is also "unevacuatable, unfinanceable, unregulatable."

Nader said nuclear power is unnecessary because there are many energy alternatives--led by solar and wind. It is unsafe because catastrophic accidents can and will happen. He noted how the former U.S. Atomic Energy Commission in a 1960s report projected that a major nuclear accident could irradiate an area "the size of Pennsylvania." He asked: "Is this the kind of gamble we want to take to boil water?"

Nuclear power is extremely expensive and thus uneconomic, he went on. It is uninsurable with the original scheme for nuclear power in the U.S. based on the federal Price-Anderson Act which limits a utility's liability to a "fraction" of the cost of damages from an accident. That law remains, extended by Congress "every ten years or so."

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www.karlgrossman.com

Karl Grossman is a professor of journalism at the State University of New York/College at Old Westbury and host of the nationally syndicated TV program Enviro Close-Up.

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We can be forgiven; flying blind here, for the wro... by molly cruz on Thursday, Oct 10, 2013 at 2:35:55 PM
The irrational, hysteria inducing, attacks on nucl... by Clarc King on Thursday, Oct 10, 2013 at 2:50:47 PM
Clarc wrote, "...man is charged by nature itself... by Derryl Hermanutz on Thursday, Oct 10, 2013 at 7:06:56 PM
humans are not evolved enough to use nuclear in a ... by laurie steele on Thursday, Oct 10, 2013 at 7:37:20 PM