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Our Justice System Requires Us To Punish Wrongdoers. What if There Were a Better Way?

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The banner says "No justice. No Peace."


When we say we want justice, what do we really mean?

We think we know what it means -- that we who want justice are willing to fight for it. The words have a deeper meaning, of course. They are intended to remind us that that it is an impossibility to have a peaceful society as long as there is injustice, because inevitably those who are oppressed will rise up.

As slogans go, this one is pretty clever, so clever, in fact, that it's easy to get caught up in the words and forget to think about what they actually mean.

What is it that we really want when we say we want justice?

A year ago I would have easily answered "true equality under the law" -- as opposed to our current criminal (in)justice system, in which race clearly plays a major role. More to the point, I would have said that I wanted the determination of guilt and the administration of punishment to not be correlated to race or any other demographic characteristic.

Today, I'm no longer satisfied with that.

For those of us living in the United States, "doing justice" is mostly synonymous with administering punishment. We may not literally follow the Biblical edict of "an eye for an eye", but most of us still believe that "the punishment must fit the crime". Indeed, many of us would be hard pressed to even come up with an alternative justice system.

Yet alternatives abound in the form of restorative justice.

There are many restorative justice systems. The one I've been studying is Restorative Circles (RC), a system developed by Dominic Barter in the shanty towns of urban Brazil and now spreading across the world as a means of promoting and facilitating social justice, group cohesion, resilient relationships and personal healing.

Restorative Circles provide a way for individuals and communities to handle conflicts, including racial conflicts, compassionately rather than punitively, as well as to heal and learn from these conflicts. These days when I say I want justice, this is the kind of justice system I have in mind -- a system that values everyone's needs and is designed to address those needs without either blame or compromise1.

To the uninitiated, restorative processes may appear idealistic and naive. After all, they reject the two core aspects of the traditional justice system: the assignment of blame and the administration of punishment. Instead, the goal of the Circle is for the parties involved in the conflict to first gain mutual understanding of the others' experiences and needs and then to restore or build a mutually satisfying relationship.

Talking is involved, so is listening. Lots of listening. But it's a decidedly different type of talk than people usually engage in2, and it's not just talk.

The restorative process is designed to lead to voluntary (and they really are voluntary!) acts offered to repair or restore the relationship. The two words are not synonymous. Reparative acts have to do with compensation -- paying for a broken window is a reparative act -- while restorative acts are those whose value is largely symbolic, a heart-felt apology may qualify, or a basket of vegetables from one's garden, or an invitation to dinner. It's certainly not surprising that people prefer to have both, but it turns out, Barter explains, that if they can only have one, there is a strong preference for acts that are restorative.

And yet, restorative processes aren't, at the heart of it, about apologies or even about restorative acts more generally. They're about mutual understanding and connection. Too often racial conflict is addressed with (legitimate) accusations. Denial ensues. Feelings are hurt. At the end, no one feels good about what happened.

Restorative processes offer an alternative, one that connects people by allowing them to not just understand each other but experience each other's humanity. That's why restorative acts are offered. That's why they are experienced as restorative. There is nothing like it in our current ways of doing justice.

In his trainings, Barter weaves in multiple examples from a variety of contexts. In one, a masked thief enters a small convenience store and robs the owner at gunpoint. He is apprehended a short while later and agrees to a restorative process. In that process, he explains that he did what he did because he was pressured to do so by a gang in order to demonstrate his commitment. The store owner shares how, weeks later, he still felt traumatized by the incident. It takes more than an hour to work through the nuances of understanding each other. When they finally reach the action phase of the process, the store owner offers the would-be-thief a job in the store.

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http://internal.psychology.illinois.edu/~lyubansk/

Mikhail Lyubansky, Ph.D., is a member of the teaching faculty in the Department of Psychology at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, where he teaches Psychology of Race and Ethnicity, Theories of Psychotherapy, and a graduate-level restorative justice practicum based at a youth detention center. An autobiographical essay of Mikhail's interests in race relations and basketball is available here.

Since 2009, Mikhail has been learning, facilitating, evaluating, and supporting others in the U.S. in learning about Restorative Circles, a restorative practice developed in Brazil by Dominic Barter and associates. In addition to conflict and restorative practices, Mikhail also has a long-standing interest (going back about 20 years) in race and (more...)
 
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"Go and sin no more", be a lobbyist instead. That'... by Native American on Thursday, Aug 19, 2010 at 6:02:01 AM
it won't work in this country. This country is tra... by Laura Roberts on Thursday, Aug 19, 2010 at 7:36:35 AM
I didn't describe what actually happens in the Res... by Mikhail Lyubansky on Thursday, Aug 19, 2010 at 9:31:13 AM
I knew Blago would either skate, or almost skate. ... by Steven G. Erickson on Thursday, Aug 19, 2010 at 8:18:02 AM
in most civil cases and may be useful in juvenile ... by John Sanchez Jr. on Thursday, Aug 19, 2010 at 8:26:22 AM
Thanks for the comment, John. In Brazil, where thi... by Mikhail Lyubansky on Thursday, Aug 19, 2010 at 9:17:15 AM
I have heard estimates by people with the credenti... by John Sanchez Jr. on Thursday, Aug 19, 2010 at 12:05:02 PM
One -justice for those who can afford to buy it an... by John Shriver on Thursday, Aug 19, 2010 at 8:32:31 AM
I'd really like to know what you mean by your last... by Mikhail Lyubansky on Thursday, Aug 19, 2010 at 9:24:50 AM
You read that right, Mikhail. Sometimes we have to... by John Shriver on Thursday, Aug 19, 2010 at 2:44:42 PM
Got to where Gandhi's work is referenced, which le... by Margaret Bassett on Thursday, Aug 19, 2010 at 8:50:41 AM
How can you consider restrative justice with bipar... by Ronald Bachman on Thursday, Aug 19, 2010 at 9:31:42 AM
The evidence suggests otherwise, Ronald. As just o... by Mikhail Lyubansky on Thursday, Aug 19, 2010 at 9:41:26 AM
There is described in the old testament a state of... by David Roche on Thursday, Aug 19, 2010 at 9:53:49 AM
Man, I'd love to see the Wall-Street thing happen!... by Mikhail Lyubansky on Thursday, Aug 19, 2010 at 10:08:12 AM
I agree. The philosophy which regulates Capitalism... by David Roche on Thursday, Aug 19, 2010 at 12:21:53 PM
Corporations have a history of wanting so-called n... by Margaret Bassett on Thursday, Aug 19, 2010 at 10:33:50 AM
inroads into traditional concepts of justice, but ... by GLloyd Rowsey on Thursday, Aug 19, 2010 at 11:53:12 AM
Link to an article on Irish restorative justice h... by e t uranus on Thursday, Aug 19, 2010 at 1:18:10 PM
Mr. Lyubansky, if you have not noticed, for those ... by Herbert Calhoun on Friday, Aug 20, 2010 at 5:56:01 PM
I agree, Mr. Calhoun. I've read and written about ... by Mikhail Lyubansky on Friday, Aug 20, 2010 at 10:33:59 PM
What you say is true. However, it is precisely "th... by Herbert Calhoun on Wednesday, Aug 25, 2010 at 11:35:02 AM