Add this Page to Facebook!   Submit to Twitter   Submit to Reddit   Submit to Stumble Upon   Pin It!   Fark It!   Tell A Friend  
Printer Friendly Page Save As Favorite Save As Favorite View Article Stats
4 comments

General News

Amazonian Communities Occupy the Belo Monte Dam Site to Free the Xingu River!

By (about the author)     Permalink       (Page 1 of 1 pages)
Related Topic(s): ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; , Add Tags Add to My Group(s)

View Ratings | Rate It

Headlined to H3 6/16/12
Become a Fan
  (38 fans)

opednews.com

Small towns in Maine speaking back to the corporate food system and now we hear Natives in the Amazon are busting dams!!!

On the Eve of the Rio+20 UN Conference, Community Resistance Calls Attention to Brazilian Government's Unsustainable Energy Policy

Amazon Watch, International Rivers, Movimento Xingu Vivo
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE | June 15, 2012

For more information, contact:
Andrew Miller, +55-21-8380-7699, Email address removed
Atossa Soltani, +1-202-256-9795 or +55-21-8380-8050 or +55-93-9210-7211, Email address removed
Brent Millikan, +55 618-153-7009, Email address removed
Movimento Xingu Vivo, +55-11-9853-9950 or +55-93-3515-2927

Altamira, Brazil -- While the Brazilian Government prepares to host the Rio+20 United Nations Earth Summit, 3,000 kilometers north in the country's Amazon region indigenous peoples, farmers, fisherfolk, activists and local residents affected by the construction of the massive Belo Monte Dam project began a symbolic peaceful occupation of the dam site to "free the Xingu River."

In the early morning hours, three hundred women and children arrived in the hamlet of Belo Monte on the Transamazon Highway, and marched onto a temporary earthen dam recently built to impede the flow of the Xingu River. Using pick axes and shovels, local people who are being displaced by the project removed a strip of earthen dam to restore the Xingu's natural flow.

Residents gathered in formation spelling out the words "Pare Belo Monte" meaning "Stop Belo Monte" to send a powerful message to the world prior to the gathering in Rio and demanding the cancellation of the $18 billion Belo Monte dam project (aerial photos of the human banner available upon request).

Demonstrators planted five hundred native açai trees to stabilize the riverbank that has been destroyed by the initial construction of the Belo Monte dam. They also erected 200 crosses on the banks of the Xingu to honor the lives of those lost defending the Amazon.

Also this morning, hundreds of residents of Altamira held a march to the headquarters of dam-building consortium NESA. The actions are part of Xingu+23, a multi-day series of festivities, debates and actions commemorating 23 years since the residents of the Xingu first defeated the original Belo Monte dam. Residents have been gathering in the community of San Antonio, a hamlet displaced by the consortium's base of operations and in Altamira, a boomtown of 130,000 severely affected by the dam project.

Antonia Melo, the coordinator of Xingu Vivo Movement said, "This battle is far from being over. This is our cry: we want this river to stay alive. This dam will not be built. We, the people who live along the banks of the Xingu, who subsist from the river, who drink from the river, and who are already suffering from of the most irresponsible projects in the history of Brazil are demanding: Stop Belo Monte."

Sheyla Juruna, a leader from the Juruna indigenous community affected by the dam said, "The time is now! The Brazilian government is killing the Xingu River and destroying the lives of indigenous peoples. We need to send a message that we have not been silenced and that this is our territory. We vow to take action in our own way to stop the Belo Monte dam. We will defend our river until the end!"

Protestors and affected communities are highlighting the glaring gap between reality and the Brazilian government's rhetoric about Amazon dams as a source of "clean energy" for a "green economy." The Belo Monte dam is the tip of the iceberg of an unprecedented wave of 70 large dams proposed for in the Amazon Basin fueled by narrow political and economic interests, with devastating and irreversible consequences for one of the world's most precious biomes and its peoples.

A delegation of international observers and human rights advocates including Brazilian actor Sergio Marone of the Drop of Water Movement came to witness and lend visibility to the actions.

Slated to be the 3rd largest hydroelectric project in the world, Belo Monte would divert 80 percent of the Xingu River's flow through artificial canals, flooding over 600 square kilometers of rainforest while drying out a 100-kilometer stretch of the river known as the "Big Bend," which is home to hundreds of indigenous and riverine families. Though sold to the public as "clean energy," Belo Monte would generate an enormous amount of methane, a greenhouse gas 25-50 times more potent than carbon dioxide.

For More Information, visit:

http://amazonwatch.org/news/2012/0615-amazonian-communities-occupy-the-belo-monte-dam-site-to-free-the-xingu-river

 

Burl is an avid writer and publishes to OpEd News. He is author of "Sophia's Web: A Passionate Call to Heal Our Wounded Nature." As of this writing, Burl is planning to self-publish the book. Alongside his wife, Burl co-hosts an on line radio (more...)
 
Add this Page to Facebook!   Submit to Twitter   Submit to Reddit   Submit to Stumble Upon   Pin It!   Fark It!   Tell A Friend

The views expressed in this article are the sole responsibility of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of this website or its editors.

Writers Guidelines

Contact Author Contact Editor View Authors' Articles

Most Popular Articles by this Author:     (View All Most Popular Articles by this Author)

What's in a Seed?

Farmers File Suit Against Monsanto

Beyond Monsanto: Rekindling a Healthy Earth in the Face of Corporate Farming

The Healing Journey of a Daughter of Slavery and a Son of the Slave Trade

Sex as Natural Process: A Primary Step to Healing Alienation?

Occupy The World, The Collective Consciousness And Human Evolution

Comments

The time limit for entering new comments on this article has expired.

This limit can be removed. Our paid membership program is designed to give you many benefits, such as removing this time limit. To learn more, please click here.

Comments: Expand   Shrink   Hide  
2 people are discussing this page, with 4 comments
To view all comments:
Expand Comments
(Or you can set your preferences to show all comments, always)

Small towns in Maine declaring food soverignty whi... by Burl Hall on Saturday, Jun 16, 2012 at 3:17:22 AM
Yes, the Natives are restless.  As our body's... by Burl Hall on Saturday, Jun 16, 2012 at 3:24:45 AM
As the writer Vandana Shiva tells us the people es... by Theresa Paulfranz on Saturday, Jun 16, 2012 at 3:42:52 PM
or I think that was the inspiration for the movie.... by Theresa Paulfranz on Saturday, Jun 16, 2012 at 3:44:52 PM