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CISPA Is Back

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"We can achieve these goals through a partnership with the owners and operators of critical infrastructure to improve cybersecurity information sharing and collaboratively develop and implement risk-based standards."

Following Obama's EO, lawmakers revisited CISPA. On February 14, Rep. Mike Rogers (R. MI) and Dutch Ruppersberger (D. MD) reintroduced it.

Last April, it passed the House 248 - 168. Civil libertarian outrage gave senators second thoughts. The bill died in committee. It's now back from the dead.

On February 13, the ACLU responded . It said CISPA "fails to protect privacy."

Reintroducing it lets "companies share sensitive and personal American internet data with the government, including the National Security Agency and other military agencies."

"CISPA does not require companies to make reasonable efforts to protect their customers' privacy and then allows the government to use that data for undefined 'national-security' purposes and without any minimization procedures, which have been in effect in other security statutes for decades."

On February 13, the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) headlined "CISPA, the Privacy-Invading Cybersecurity Spying Bill, is Back in Congress."

It's the same "contentious bill civil liberties advocates fought last year." It poorly defines cybersecurity exemptions to privacy law."

It offers "broad immunities to companies (wishing) to share data with government agencies (including the private communications of users) in the name of cybersecurity."

It lets companies share data with federal agencies. They include military intelligence ones like NSA. 

EFF categorically opposes CISPA. It's deeply flawed. According to the Project on Freedom, Security & Technology at the Center for Democracy & Technology:

"Under a broad cybersecurity umbrella, it permits companies to share user communications directly with the super secret National Security Agency and permits the NSA to use that information for non-cybersecurity reasons." 

"This risks turning the cybersecurity program into a back door intelligence surveillance program run by a military entity with little transparency or public accountability." 

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I was born in 1934, am a retired, progressive small businessman concerned about all the major national and world issues, committed to speak out and write about them.
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