Back   OpEdNews
Font
PageWidth
Post a Comment
Original Content at
https://www.opednews.com/articles/An-American-Photographer-i-by-Gentry-Rowsey-090313-290.html
(Note: You can view every article as one long page if you sign up as an Advocate Member, or higher).

March 15, 2009

An American Photographer in Hong Kong, Part 2: The Architecture of Density Series

By GLloyd Rowsey

Michael Wolf has lived in China since 1994

::::::::

Part 1 of Michael Wolf’s photography from Hong Kong presented images from the artist’s “Real Fake Art” series; it also contained a biography of Wolf.  You can view Part 1 by clicking here.

Wolf began his Architecture of Density photographic series in 2003, and the ones below are easier – for me - to enjoy as “art” than any of his “Real Fake Art” photographs in Part 1.  The Architecture of Density photographs all have balance, and colors used for contrast and effect.   Whereas - for me – the “Real Fake Art” photographs in Part 1 could as well be described as “reportage” photographs as “art” photographs.

Howsoever, for depicting a culture, Wolf’s not including any people in his Architecture of Density series is pretty daring, to my mind.  And I wonder if he’s been influenced by the enormous advances in overhead photography in the last decade, which can remove people effectively from landscapes and show an infinite variety of “un-peopled” pictorial representations, just by photographing the Earth’s surface.  As we shall see in Part 3, Wolf’s “Back Doors Series” of photographs is also “un-peopled.”

Artist Works Catalogue’s introduction to its collection of 19 of Michael Wolf’s Architecture of Density photographs reads: 

“For this series Wolf turns his lens on the vast high-rises of Hong Kong, exploring notions of public and private space. Wolf's photographs of the towering facades of this "architecture of density" offer at first a compelling sense of abstraction and upon a closer look an abundance of details.  The images capture both the striking presence of the buildings themselves and the traces of individual lives, or minute human interventions that mark them.  Images from this series were featured in Wolf’s monograph Hong Kong: Front Door/Back Door, which was published by Thames & Hudson in 2004.”

-

-

And

-

-

And

-

-

And

-

-

And

-

-

And

-

-

-

-

(All words in quotation marks and images are courtesy of artnet and its Artist Works Catalogues.  At its AWC, there is this: “artnet offers these catalogues free to the public as an educational resource. Simply click on an individual artist's image to begin, and check back often to browse new catalogues.”)  



Submitters Bio:
I have a law degree (Stanford, 66') but have never practiced. Instead, from 1967 through 1977, I tried to contribute to the revolution in America. As unsuccessful as everyone else over that decade, in 1978 I went to work for the U.S. Forest Service in San Francisco as a Clerk-Typist, GS-4. I was active in the USFS's union for several years, including a brief stint as editor of The Forest Service Monitor, the nationwide voice of the Forest Service in the National Federation of Federal Employees. Howsoever, I now believe my most important contribution while editor of the F.S.M. was bringing to the attention of F.S. employees the fact that the Black-Footed Ferret was not extinct; one had been found in 1980 on a national forest in the Colorado. In 2001 I retired from the USFS after attaining the age of 60 with 23 years of service. Stanford University was evidently unimpressed with my efforts to make USFS investigative reports of tort claim incidents available to tort claimants (ie, "the public"), alleging the negligence of a F.S. employee acting in the scope of his/her duties caused their damages, under the Freedom of Information Act. Oh well. What'cha gonna do?

Back