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May 6, 2011

Alabama's GOP Delegation Voted Against Funding for Tornado Forecasting

By Roger Shuler

Alabama Republicans voted against a bill to improve weather forecasting.

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Cross Posted at Legal Schnauzer

U.S. Rep. Spencer Bachus (R-AL) spent the better part of two days last week touring areas of his state devastated by killer tornadoes. Bachus was in Tuscaloosa when President Obama toured perhaps the hardest hit area in Alabama. And Bachus issued a somber statement, calling on citizens to come together to help comfort those affected by the storms.

Bachus, however, apparently neglected to mention that he and other Republicans in Alabama's Congressional delegation voted against funding for satellites that are critical for accurate storm forecasting. The Web site climateprogress.org reports that Bachus and his fellow Alabama Republicans--Martha Roby, Mo Brooks, Robert Aderholt, Mike Rogers, and Jo Bonner--voted against a bill that would replace aging satellites that are the heart of America's weather-forecasting system.

The ability of those satellites to provide accurate weather information probably saved hundreds, maybe thousands, of lives last week in Alabama. But the satellites need to be replaced, and Alabama Republicans decided that was not necessary--just days before their state was hit with one of the deadliest tornadoes in American history.

Reports climateprogress.org:

On Thursday, as the search for survivors continued in devastated communities across Alabama and other southern states pummeled this week by massive, terrifying tornadoes, President Obama said "we can't control when or where a terrible storm may strike, but we can control how we respond to it." Unfortunately, thanks to the spending bill orchestrated by the GOP-controlled House of Representatives, he couldn't say we are doing everything in our power to protect Americans from future extreme weather events.

How important is modern technology in forecasting powerful storms?

The Associated Press characterized the number of fatalities from these storms –more than 340 as of Saturday -- as something that "seems out of a bygone era, before Doppler radar and pinpoint satellite forecasts were around to warn communities of severe weather. Residents were told the tornadoes were coming up to 24 minutes ahead of time, but they were just too wide, too powerful and too locked onto populated areas to avoid a horrifying body count."

It is precisely those "pinpoint satellite forecasts" that Congress, including every GOP member of Alabama's delegation, decided were luxuries America cannot afford when it passed the continuing resolution to keep the government operating for the remainder of the fiscal year.

Alabama's GOP delegation, it turns out, had other priorities, besides protecting citizens of the state from killer storms:

As we have discussed in previous posts, this action eliminated funding to replace the environmental satellites that help make our forecasts a reality. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has stated in no uncertain terms that these aging satellites will fail, and our failure to buy new ones this year will cause at least an 18 month gap in coverage.

Clearly, Congressional Republicans were more interested in protecting the $5.5 billion in subsidies and foregone royalty payments for Big Oil--which collectively reported a total of more than $30 billion in first quarter profits this week--than they were in spending the $700 million necessary to literally save the lives of their constituents.

By the way, a recent report from the Center for American Progress shows that extreme weather is becoming increasingly costly--both in terms of dollars and lives:

These extreme events included "supercell thunderstorms" in Iowa, severe drought and record wildfires in Texas, and heavy rains across the United States. The recent southeastern storms and tornadoes took at least 297 lives across eight states. And heavy rains in the Mississippi River valley could cause the most severe, damaging floods there in nearly a century.

This extreme weather, though record setting in some places, may be the new normal. Last year, unprecedented extreme weather led to a record number of disaster declarations by the Federal Emergency Management Agency. The United States and the world were swept by flooding, severe winter storms, heat waves, droughts, hurricanes, and tornadoes.

Are Spencher Bachus and his fellow Republicans paying attention to the reality of extreme weather? Apparently not. Bachus was quick to issue platitudes to the suffering, but in the following video, you will notice that he makes no mention of his own actions that make Alabamians less safe. In fact, he notes that warnings via the media were critical in saving lives. But he doesn't say that those warnings are made possible by satellite technology, which the GOP refused to support:

VIDEO: Spencer Bachus on Alabama tornadoes




Authors Bio:
I live in Birmingham, Alabama, and work in higher education. I became interested in justice-related issues after experiencing gross judicial corruption in Alabama state courts. This corruption has a strong political component. The corrupt judges are all Republicans, and the attorney who filed a fraudulent lawsuit against me has strong family ties to the Alabama Republican Party, with indirect connections to national figures such as Karl Rove. In fact, a number of Republican operatives who have played a central role in the prosecution of former Alabama Governor Don Siegelman (a Democrat) also have connections to my case.

I am married, with no kids and two Siamese cats. I am the author of the blog Legal Schnauzer. The blog is written in honor of Murphy, our miniature schnauzer (1993-2004)who did so much to help my wife and me survive our nightmarish experience with corrupt judges.

I grew up in Springfield, Missouri, and I am pretty much a lifelong St. Louis Cardinal baseball fan. I've lived in Birmingham for almost 30 years and have adopted the UAB Blazers as my Southern college football and basketball team to follow. Also, follow East Tennessee State basketball.

An avid reader, both fiction and non-fiction. Influential writers on public affairs are Kevin Phillips, Michael Lind, Thomas Edsall, E.J. Dionne, Molly Ivins, and Scott Horton.

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