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U.N. summit: What the U.S. media fails to report about Iran

By       Message Gregory Patin       (Page 1 of 5 pages)     Permalink

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This article was originally published at Madison Independent Examiner. You can view the banned video there.

 

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The U.N. summit this week featured two fiery speeches, one by Iran's President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad and the other by Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu. Netanyahu's speech received full media coverage on several networks in the U.S. that included photos of his cartoon-quality bomb drawing prop, while Ahmadinejad's was cut short on CNN before the section where he said that countries and religions should have no problems with each other.

 

That is just the tip of the iceberg regarding what the U.S. corporate-owned media fails to report about Ahmadinejad, Iran, and its nuclear program. The deception has been going on for years.

 

A meeting between Ahmadinejad and Jewish religious leaders during his visit to NYC was ignored by the U.S. media. A video and any mention of it was banned by major media outlets in the U.S., Europe and Israel. In that meeting he was presented a gift by the rabbis and exchanged well-wishes for all religions, people and cultures. Both the rabbis and Ahmadinejad discussed the distinction between the Jewish people and the Likud party in control of the Israeli government. (See video here).

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In contrast, but also equally ignored by the mainstream media, is a speech given to The Washington Institute for Near East Policy this month by an Israel lobbyist, Patrick Clawson. Citing false flag operations that began past wars, he openly suggests provoking Iran into firing the first shot in a conflict and if that does not work, "it would be best if somebody else started the war." (See video here).

 

Another story about Iran that was ignored by U.S. corporate media until The Washington Post finally got around to covering it last month is that a plot to provoke Iran into war occurred in 2007, but was foiled by a high-ranking naval intelligence officer named Gwenyth Todd. 

 

For her efforts, Todd was driven out of the navy, investigated by the FBI, may have been attempted to be assassinated, and eventually decided to move to Australia. "If you want my opinion, I am 100 percent convinced that this is about my thwarting plans to provoke war with Iran," Todd said at one point.

 

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Gregory Patin is a free-lance writer residing in Madison, WI. He earned a BA in political science from the University of Wisconsin - Madison and a MS in IT management from Colorado Tech. He is politically independent and not affiliated with either (more...)
 

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