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This article originally appeared at TomDispatch.com. To receive TomDispatch in your inbox three times a week, click here.

[Note to TomDispatch Readers:Steve Fraser's superb new book, The Limousine Liberal: How an Incendiary Image United the Right and Fractured America, is still on offer at our donation page. Any reader willing to contribute $100 or more ($125 if you live outside the United States) can get a signed, personalized copy and give this website a lift. And here's a deep bow to those of you who have already done so!

I've long had a weakness for commencement addresses, or at least for what they might be rather than what they usually are, which is why I've written them relatively regularly myself. Since no actual college or graduating class has ever asked me to give such a speech, I've addressed the graduates of 2015 and other years from what I've called "the campus of my mind." I couldn't resist doing so again. Tom]

Donald Trump Is the Mosquito, Not the Zika Virus
Class of 2016, Tell Us Who We Are
By Tom Engelhardt

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Graduates of 2016, don't be fooled by this glorious day. As you leave campus for the last time, many of you already deeply in debt and with a lifetime of payments to look forward to, you head into a world that's anything but sunny. In fact, through those gates that have done little enough to protect you is the sort of fog bank that results in traffic pile-ups on any highway.

And if you imagine that I'm here to sweep that fog away and tell you what truly lies behind it, think again. My only consolation is that, if I can't adequately explain our American world to you or your path through it, I doubt any other speaker could either.

Of course, it's not exactly a fog-lifter to say that, like it or not, you're about to graduate onto Planet Donald -- and I don't mean, for all but a few of you, a future round of golf at Mar-a-Lago. Our increasingly unnerved and disturbed world is his circus right now (whether he wins the coming election or not), just as in the Philippines, it's the circus of new president Rodrigo Duterte; in Hungary, of right-wing populist Viktor Orba'n; in Austria, of Norbert Hofer, the extremist anti-immigrant presidential candidate who just lost a squeaker by .6% of the vote; in Israel, of new defense minister Avigdor Lieberman; in Russia, of the autocratic Vladimir Putin; in France, of Marine le Pen, leader of the right-wing National Front party, who has sometimes led in polls for the next presidential election; and so on. And if you don't think that's a less than pretty political picture of our changing planet, then don't wait for the rest of this speech, just hustle out those gates. You've got a treat ahead of you.

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For the rest of us lingerers, it says something about where we all are that, once through those gates, you'll still find yourself in the richest, most powerful country around, the planet's "sole superpower." (USA! USA!) It is, however, a superpower distinctly in decline on -- and this is a historic first -- a planet similarly in decline.

How Trumpian Is American Authoritarianism?

In its halcyon days, Washington could overthrow governments, install Shahs or other rulers, do more or less what it wanted across significant parts of the globe and reap rewards, while (as in the case of Iran) not paying any price, blowback-style, for decades, if at all. That was imperial power in the blaze of the noonday sun. These days, in case you hadn't noticed, blowback for our imperial actions seems to arrive as if by high-speed rail (of which by the way, the greatest power on the planet has yet to build a single mile, if you want a quick measure of decline).

Despite having a more massive, technologically advanced, and better funded military than any other power or even group of powers on the planet, in the last decade and a half of constant war across the Greater Middle East and parts of Africa, the U.S. has won nothing, nada, zilch. Its unending wars have, in fact, led nowhere in a world growing more chaotic by the second. Its militarized "milestones," like the recent drone-killing in Pakistan of the leader of the Taliban, have proven repetitive signposts on what, even in the present fog, is surely the road to hell.

It's been relatively easy, if you live here, to notice little enough of all this and -- at least until Donald Trump arrived to the stunned fascination of the country (not to speak of the rest of the planet) -- to imagine that we live in a peaceable land with most of its familiar markers still reassuringly in place. We still have elections, our tripartite form of government (as well as the other accoutrements of a democracy), our reverential view of our Constitution and the rights it endows us with, and so on. In truth, however, the American world is coming to bear ever less resemblance to the one we still claim as ours, or rather that older America looks increasingly like a hollowed-out shell within which something new and quite different has been gestating.

After all, can anyone really doubt that representative democracy as it once existed has been eviscerated and is now -- consider Congress exhibit A -- in a state of advanced paralysis, or that just about every aspect of the country's infrastructure, is slowly fraying or crumbling and that little is being done about it? Can anyone doubt that the constitutional system -- take war powers as a prime example or, for that matter, American liberties -- has also been fraying? Can anyone doubt that the country's classic tripartite form of government, from a Supreme Court missing a member by choice of Congress to a national security state that mocks the law, is ever less checked and balanced and increasingly more than "tri"?

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In the Vietnam era, people first began talking about an "imperial presidency." Today, in areas of overwhelming importance, the White House is, if anything, somewhat less imperial, but only because it's more in thrall to the ever-expanding national security state. Though that unofficial fourth branch of government is seldom seriously considered when the ways in which our American world works are being described and though it has no place in the Constitution, it is increasingly the first branch of government in Washington, the one before which all the others kneel down.

There has, in this endless election season, been much discussion of Donald Trump's potential for "authoritarianism" (or incipient "fascism," or worse). It's a subject generally treated as if it were some tendency or property unique to the man who rode a Trump Tower escalator into the presidential race to Neil Young's "Rockin' in the Free World," or perhaps something from the 1930s that he carries in his jacket pocket and that his enthusiastic white working class followers are naturally drawn to and responsible for.

Few bother to consider the ways in which the foundations of authoritarianism have already been laid in this society -- and not by disaffected working class white men either. Few bother to consider what it means to have a national security state and a massive military machine deeply embedded in our ruling city and our American world. Few think about the (count 'em!) 17 significant intelligence agencies that eat close to $70 billion annually or the trillion dollars or more a year that disappears into our national security world, or what it means for that state within a state, that shadow government, to become ever more powerful and autonomous in the name of American "safety," especially from "terrorism" (though terrorism represents the most microscopic of dangers for most Americans).

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Tom Engelhardt, who runs the Nation Institute's Tomdispatch.com ("a regular antidote to the mainstream media"), is the co-founder of the American Empire Project and, most recently, the author of Mission Unaccomplished: Tomdispatch (more...)
 

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