Power of Story
Send a Tweet        
- Advertisement -

Share on Google Plus Share on Twitter 1 Share on Facebook Share on LinkedIn Share on PInterest Share on Fark! Share on Reddit Share on StumbleUpon Tell A Friend 1 (2 Shares)  

Printer Friendly Page Save As Favorite View Favorites (# of views)   1 comment
OpEdNews Op Eds

The U.S. Media And The 13-Year-old Yemeni Boy Burned To Death Last Month By A U.S. Drone

By       Message Glenn Greenwald     Permalink
      (Page 1 of 1 pages)
Related Topic(s): ; ; ; ; , Add Tags Add to My Group(s)

Must Read 1   Well Said 1   Supported 1  
View Ratings | Rate It

opednews.com Headlined to H2 2/10/15

Author 4807
Become a Fan
  (147 fans)
From openclipart.org/detail/174874/predator-drone-2-by-joe-linux-174874: Predator Drone
Predator Drone
(Image by openclipart.org)
  Permission   Details   DMCA
- Advertisement -
br />

On January 26, the New York Times claimed that "a CIA drone strike in Yemen. ... killed three suspected Qaeda fighters on Monday." How did they know the identity of the dead? As usual, it was in part because "American officials said." There was not a whiff of skepticism about this claim despite the fact that "a senior American official, speaking on the condition of anonymity, declined to confirm the names of the victims" and "a C.I.A. spokesman declined to comment."

That NYT article did cite what it called "a member of Al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula" (AQAP), who provided the names of the three victims, one of whom was "Mohammed Toiman al-Jahmi, a Yemeni teenager whose father and brother were previously killed in American drone strikes." The article added that "the Qaeda member did not know Mr. Jahmi's age but said he was a member of the terrorist group."

- Advertisement -

In fact, as the Guardian reported today, "Mr. Jahmi's age" was 13 on the day the American drone ended his life. Just months earlier, the Yemeni teenager told that paper that "he lived in constant fear of the 'death machines' in the sky that had already killed his father and brother." It was 2011 when "an unmanned combat drone killed his father and teenage brother as they were out herding the family's camels." In the strike two weeks ago, Mohammed was killed along with his brother-in-law and a third man.

Mohammed's older brother Maqded said he "saw all the bodies completely burned, like charcoal" -- undoubtedly quite similar to the way the Jordanian combat pilot looked after he was burned alive last month by ISIS. That's not an accident: the weapons the U.S. military uses are deliberately designed to incinerate people to death. The missiles shot by their drones are named "Hellfire." Of his younger, now-deceased 13-year-old brother, Maqded told the Guardian: "He wasn't a member of al-Qaida. He was a kid."

Click Here to Read Whole Article

- Advertisement -

 

- Advertisement -

Must Read 1   Well Said 1   Supported 1  
View Ratings | Rate It

Glenn Greenwald is one of three co-founding editors of The Intercept. He is a journalist, constitutional lawyer, and author of four New York Times best-selling books on politics and law. His most recent book, No Place (more...)
 

Share on Google Plus Submit to Twitter Add this Page to Facebook! Share on LinkedIn Pin It! Add this Page to Fark! Submit to Reddit Submit to Stumble Upon



Go To Commenting
/* The Petition Site */
The views expressed in this article are the sole responsibility of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of this website or its editors.

Writers Guidelines

Contact AuthorContact Author Contact EditorContact Editor Author PageView Authors' Articles
- Advertisement -

Most Popular Articles by this Author:     (View All Most Popular Articles by this Author)

HSBC, too big to jail, is the new poster child for US two-tiered justice system

US investigates possible WikiLeaks leaker for "communicating with the enemy"

Prosecution of Anonymous activists highlights war for Internet control

The myth of Obama's "blunders" and "weakness"

The Remarkable, Unfathomable Ignorance of Debbie Wasserman Schultz

4 quick points about the MSNBC discussion