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OpEdNews Op Eds    H3'ed 10/10/16

Spain's Turmoil and Europe's Crisis

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From Dispatches From The Edge

The resignation of Pedro Sanchez has left Spain's PSOE in crisis
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While the chaos devouring Spain's Socialist Workers Party (PSOE) mixed elements of farce and tragedy, the issues roiling Spanish politics reflect a general crisis in the European Union (EU) and a sober warning to the continent: Europe's 500 million people need answers, and the old formulas are not working.

On the tragedy side was the implosion of a 137-year old party that at one point claimed the allegiance of half of Spain's people now reduced to fratricidal infighting. The PSOE's embattled General Secretary Pedro Sanchez was forced to resign when party grandees and regional leaders organized a coup against his plan to form a united front of the left.

The farce was street theater, literally: Veronica Perez, the president of the PSOE's Federal Committee and a coup supporter, was forced to hold a press conference on a sidewalk in Madrid because Sanchez's people barred her from the Party's headquarters.

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There was no gloating by the Socialists main competitors on the left. Pablo Iglesias, the leader of Podemos, somberly called it "the most important crisis since the end of the civil war in the most important Spanish party in the past century."

That the party coup is a crisis for Spain there is no question, but the issues that prevented the formation of a working government for the past nine months are the same ones Italians, Greeks, Portuguese, Irish -- and before they jumped ship, the British -- are wrestling with: growing economic inequality, high unemployment, stagnant economies, and whole populations abandoned by Europe's elites.

The spark for the PSOE's meltdown was a move by Sanchez, to break the political logjam convulsing Spanish politics. The current crisis goes back to the Dec. 20 2015 national elections that saw Spain's two traditional parties -- the rightwing People's Party (PP), led by Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy, and Sanchez's Socialists -- take a beating. The PP lost 63 seats and its majority, and the PSOE lost 20 seats. Two new parties, the leftwing Podemos and the rightwing nationalist party Ciudadanos, crashed the party, winning 69 seats and 40 seats, respectively.

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While the PP took the most seats, it was not enough for a majority in the 350-seat legislature, which requires 176. In theory, the PSOE could have cobbled together a government with Podemos, Catalans and independents, but the issue of Catalonian independence got in the way.

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