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Julian Assange's Real Crime: Making It Difficult for America to Wage Superpower

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WikiLeaks pledges to continue to fight government secrecy despite persecution by the U.S. and other countries.
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Political leaders like the tyrannical Senator Joseph Lieberman (I-Conn.) and complicit authoritarian Senator Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) have come out in full support of prosecuting the now-captured and arrested Julian Assange under the U.S. Espionage Act of 1917. Whether they can do so or not is of no concern to them, and don't expect that to matter as the press repeats this idea that Assange could be prosecuted.

Sen. Lieberman, Senator John Ensign (R-Nev) and Senator Scott Brown (R-Mass) have introduced a bill that would "stop" WikiLeaks and make it "illegal to publish the names of military or intelligence community informants." The bill known as the Securing Human Intelligence and Enforcing Lawful Dissemination Act (SHIELD) would amend the Espionage Act. The main problem with the act is, as Dave Weigel of Slate wrote, "the information being leaked, while embarrassing, hasn't been highly classified. It's been secret, or marked "NOFORN," but it's not classified." Thus, it appears the act might currently be ineffective in "stopping" WikiLeaks or future releases of information by any individual, group or organization.

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What these senators aim to do is guaranteed to further reduce the protections for journalists and members of the media in this country. It's guaranteed to further create a political climate where journalists are faced with the possibility of coercive measures if they actually exercise the rights and privileges granted to them by the First Amendment. And, it's that climate that ensures more and more individuals will leak materials to WikiLeaks instead of media outlets in America, who cannot give their sources guarantees they will be protected under the law.

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Sen. Lieberman appeared on the Fox News Channel on December 7th to express his support for not only prosecuting Assange but also examining the culpability of media organizations like the New York Times, which have referenced in the leaked secrets in their news articles.

HOST: Julian Assange has written an editorial that points out or characterizes his organization as an underdog in the media world. And he's saying that he is a journalist and he's saying that he's just providing information out there for the world's citizens to see. He mentions that organizations like the New York Times have published his information, which you're classifying as state secrets. So, are other media outlets that have posted what WikiLeaks put out there also culpable on this and could be charged with something?

LIEBERMAN: I have said that I believe the question you are raising is a serious legal question that has to be answered. In other words, this is very sensitive stuff because it gets into America's First Amendment, but if you go from the initial crime--Private Manning charged with a crime of stealing these classified documents, he gives them to WikiLeaks, I certainly believe WikiLeaks has violated the espionage act. But then what about the news organizations, including the NYT, that accepted it and distributed it? I'm not here to make a final judgment on that. But to me the New York Times has committed at least an act of bad citizenship, but whether they have committed a crime I think that bears very intensive inquiry by the Justice Department. [emphasis added]

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In his appearance, Sen. Lieberman called the release of documents by Assange and WikiLeaks "the most serious violation of the Espionage Act" in America's history.

Sen. Feinstein, in her editorial published by the Wall Street Journal , wrote, "When WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange released his latest document trove--more than 250,000 secret State Department cables--he intentionally harmed the U.S. government. The release of these documents damages our national interests and puts innocent lives at risk. He should be vigorously prosecuted for espionage."

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Kevin Gosztola is managing editor of Shadowproof Press. He also produces and co-hosts the weekly podcast, "Unauthorized Disclosure." He was an editor for OpEdNews.com

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