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Gen. Petraeus: Too Big to Jail

By       Message Ray McGovern       (Page 1 of 2 pages)     Permalink

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Reprinted from Consortium News


Gen. David Petraeus in a photo with his biographer/mistress Paula Broadwell.
(Image by (U.S. government photo))
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The leniency shown former CIA Director (and retired General) David Petraeus by the Justice Department in sparing him prison time for the serious crimes that he has committed puts him in the same preferential, immune-from-incarceration category as those running the financial institutions of Wall Street, where, incidentally, Petraeus now makes millions. By contrast, "lesser" folks -- and particularly the brave men and women who disclose government crimes -- get to serve time, even decades, in jail.

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Petraeus is now a partner at KKR, a firm specializing in large leveraged buyouts, and his hand-slap guilty plea to a misdemeanor for mishandling government secrets should not interfere from his continued service at the firm. KKR's founders originally worked at Bear Stearns, the institution that failed in early 2008 at the beginning of the meltdown of the investment banking industry later that year.

Despite manifestly corrupt practices like those of subprime mortgage lenders, none of those responsible went to jail after the 2008-09 financial collapse which cost millions of Americans their jobs and homes. The bailed-out banks were judged "too big to fail" and the bankers "too big to jail."

Two years ago, in a highly revealing slip of the tongue, Attorney General Eric Holder explained to Congress that it can "become difficult" to prosecute major financial institutions because they are so large that a criminal charge could pose a threat to the economy -- or perhaps what he meant was an even bigger threat to the economy.

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Holder tried to walk back his unintended slip into honesty a year later, claiming, "There is no such thing as 'too big to jail.'" And this bromide was dutifully echoed by Holder's likely successor, Loretta Lynch, at her confirmation hearing in late January.

Words, though, are cheap. The proof is in the pudding. It remains true that not one of the crooked bankers or investment advisers who inflicted untold misery on ordinary people, gambling away much of their life savings, has been jailed. Not one.

And now Petraeus, who gave his biographer/mistress access to some of the nation's most sensitive secrets and then lied about it to the FBI, has also been shown to be too big to jail. Perhaps Holder decided it would be a gentlemanly thing to do on his way out of office -- to take this awkward issue off Lynch's initial to-do list and spare her the embarrassment of demonstrating once again that equality under the law has become a mirage; that not only big banks, but also big shots like Petraeus -- who was Official Washington's most beloved general before becoming CIA director -- are, in fact, too big to jail.

It strikes me, in a way, as fitting that even on his way out the door, Eric Holder would not miss the opportunity to demonstrate his propensity for giving hypocrisy a bad name.

A Slap on Wrist for Serious Crimes

The Justice Department let David Petraeus cop a plea after requiring him to admit that he had shared with his biographer/mistress eight black notebooks containing highly classified information and then lied about it to FBI investigators. Serious crimes? The following quotes are excerpted from "U.S. v. David Howell Petraeus: Factual Basis in support of the Plea Agreement" offered by the U.S. District Court for the Western District of North Carolina, Charlotte Division:

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"17. During his tenure as Commander of ISAF in Afghanistan, defendant DAVID HOWELL PETRAEUS maintained bound, five-by-eight-inch notebooks that contained his daily schedule and classified and unclassified notes he took during official meetings, conferences, and briefings. ... A total of eight such books (hereinafter the "Black Books") encompassed the period of defendant DAVID HOWELL PETRAEUS'S ISAF [Afghanistan] command and collectively contained classified information regarding the identities of covert officers, war strategy, intelligence capabilities and mechanisms, diplomatic discussions, quotes and deliberative discussions from high-level National Security Council meetings, and defendant DAVID HOWELL PETRAEUS's discussions with the President of the United States of America. [emphasis added]

"18. The Black Books contained national defense information, including Top Secret//SCI and code word information."

Despite the sensitivity of the notebooks and existing law and regulations, Petraeus did not surrender them to proper custody when he returned to the U.S. after being nominated to become the Director of the CIA. According to the Court's "Factual Basis," Petraeus's biographer/mistress recorded a conversation of Aug. 4, 2011, in which she asks about the "Black Books." The Court statement continues:

"[Petraeus] 'Umm, well, they're really -- I mean they are highly classified, some of them. ... I mean there's code word stuff in there.'" On or about August 27, 2011, defendant DAVID HOWELL PETRAEUS sent an email to his biographer in which he agreed to provide the Black Books to his biographer. ... On or about August 28, 2011, defendant DAVID HOWEL PETRAEUS delivered the Black Books to a private residence in Washington, D.C. where his biographer was staying. ... On or about September 1, 2011, defendant DAVID HOWELL PETRAEUS retrieved the Black Books from the D.C. private residence and returned them to his own Arlington, Virginia home."[emphasis added]

I would think it a safe guess that Petraeus's timing can be attributed to his awareness that his privacy and freedom of movement was about to be greatly diminished, once his CIA personal security detail started keeping close track of him from his first day on the job as CIA Director, Sept. 6, 2011...

"32. On or about October 26, 2012, defendant DAVID HOWELL PETRAEUS was interviewed by two FBI special agents. " [He] was advised that the special agents were conducting a criminal investigation. ... PETRAEUS stated that (a) he had never provided any classified information to his biographer, and (b) he had never facilitated the provision of classified information to his biographer. These statements were false. Defendant DAVID HOWELL PETRAEUS then and there knew that he previously shared the Black Books with his biographer." [emphasis added]

Lying to the FBI? No problem. As "Expose Facts" blogger Marcy Wheeler immediately commented: "For lying to the FBI -- a crime that others go to prison for for months and years -- Petraeus will just get a two-point enhancement on his sentencing guidelines. The Department of Justice basically completely wiped out the crime of covering up his crime of leaking some of the country's most sensitive secrets to his mistress." [emphasis added]

Talk about "prosecutorial discretion" or, in this case, indiscretion -- giving Petraeus a fine and probation but no felony conviction or prison time for what he did! Lesser lights are not so fortunate. Just ask Chelsea (formerly Bradley) Manning who is serving a 35-year prison sentence for disclosing information to the public about U.S. war crimes and other abuses. Or Edward Snowden, who is stuck in Russia facing a U.S. indictment on espionage charges for informing the people about pervasive and unconstitutional U.S. government surveillance of common citizens.

Or former CIA officer John Kiriakou who was sent to prison for inadvertently revealing the name of one Agency official cognizant of CIA torture. Here's what Neil MacBride, U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of Virginia, said then: "The government has a vital interest in protecting the identities of those involved in covert operations. Leaks of highly sensitive, closely held and classified information compromise national security and can put individual lives in danger."

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Ray McGovern works with Tell the Word, the publishing arm of the ecumenical Church of the Saviour in inner-city Washington. He was an Army infantry/intelligence officer and then a CIA analyst for 27 years, and is now on the Steering Group of Veteran Intelligence Professionals for Sanity (VIPS). His (more...)
 

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