Send a Tweet
Most Popular Choices
Share on Facebook 9 Share on Twitter 1 Share on LinkedIn Share on Reddit Tell A Friend Printer Friendly Page Save As Favorite View Favorites
General News

Canadian Oil Company Trashes Indian Land and Faces Spiritual War

By   Follow Me on Twitter     Message Georgianne Nienaber       (Page 1 of 2 pages)     Permalink    (# of views)   5 comments

Related Topic(s): ; ; ; ; ; ; ; , Add Tags
Add to My Group(s)

Must Read 5   Well Said 3   Supported 3  
View Ratings | Rate It

opednews.com Headlined to H4 8/4/15

Author 3681
Become a Fan
  (46 fans)
- Advertisement -
The Canadian oil company, Enbridge, might have thought they found the "path of least resistance" by routing oil pipelines through Indian treaty lands in northern Minnesota, but what they got was a declaration of war from the White Earth and Mille Lacs bands of Ojibwe. In June the Minnesota Public Utility Commission (PUC) granted Enbridge Inc. a certificate of need for the Sandpiper pipeline. The PUC completely ignored requests from the tribes to consider protests during the public hearing process despite the fact that the pipeline would violate treaty rights and endanger the wild rice and water of the northland.

How did the PUC get away with this?

It rescheduled its public hearing to a date two weeks earlier than the notice provided to tribes, and no testimony from the tribes' own hearings could be entered into the MPUC record.

"Manoomin," or Wild Rice, is a sacred food to the Anishinaabe. Its spiritual importance cannot be overstated. Tribal harvesters in Minnesota are the largest producers of hand-harvested wild rice in the United States. With Manoomin's status as a federally protected resource, it is shocking that the PUC would grant a right-of-way through treaty ceded territories and across sensitive wild rice growing areas.

- Advertisement -

The Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwe released a statement condemning the ruling.

This is another example of the voices of American Indians being disregarded in favor of the rich and powerful. It is no coincidence that the route preferred by Canadian-based Enbridge crosses miles of vulnerable watersheds, crossing the poorest counties in Minnesota with the highest Native American populations, exposing those impoverished communities that already suffer from health disparities to severe and irreparable ecological harm.

The three and now possibly four pipelines, with the addition of Line 3, will create an Enbridge energy corridor, transecting the watersheds of Rice Lake on the White Earth reservation and the Rice Lake and Sandy Lake territories of the East Lake community of Mille Lacs reservation.

- Advertisement -


Proposed Minnesota Oil Pipelines
(Image by honorearth.org)
  Permission   Details   DMCA

Technically the pipelines do not cross any Indian reservations, but do cross the watershed, including lakes and forests in northern Minnesota where treaties give tribes the right to fish and gather wild rice.

"The Minnesota PUC's decision to grant a certificate of need to the Enbridge Corporation is a declaration of war against the Anishinaabeg people, a slap to tribal governments, and a threat to the water of Minnesota," said Honor the Earth's Winona LaDuke.

"This is far from over," Mille Lacs Band Chief Executive Melanie Benjamin told the Brainerd Daily Dispatch. "We will do everything we can to protect our homeland."

If that wasn't a clear enough message, in early July, the National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) adopted a formal resolution calling for a full Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) on Enbridge Energy's proposed Sandpiper/Line 3 oil pipeline corridor across treaty-ceded territory in Northern Minnesota. The NCAI is the oldest and largest national organization of American Indian and Alaska Native tribal governments. Founded in 1944, the organization serves as a unified voice for the broad interests of tribal governments and communities.

- Advertisement -

Another new pipeline, the Sandpiper, will bring oil from the Bakken fields to refineries on Lake Superior.

The Enbridge Alberta Clipper pipeline, which already crosses the Minnesota Red Lake Reservation, is going through an approval process to double its capacity to carry tar sands oil. This pipeline has leaked on numerous occasions, threatening the waterways and wild rice beds of northern Minnesota. The proposed line would be bigger than the Keystone XL.

Honor the Earth has scheduled a series of events in August as part of its third annual "Love Water, Not Oil" tour.

Next Page  1  |  2

 

- Advertisement -

Must Read 5   Well Said 3   Supported 3  
View Ratings | Rate It

opednews.com

Georgianne Nienaber is an investigative environmental and political writer. She lives in rural northern Minnesota, New Orleans and South Florida. Her articles have appeared in The Society of Professional Journalists' Online Quill (more...)
 

Share on Google Plus Submit to Twitter Add this Page to Facebook! Share on LinkedIn Pin It! Add this Page to Fark! Submit to Reddit Submit to Stumble Upon Share Author on Social Media   Go To Commenting

The views expressed herein are the sole responsibility of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of this website or its editors.

Writers Guidelines

Contact AuthorContact Author Contact EditorContact Editor Author PageView Authors' Articles

Most Popular Articles by this Author:     (View All Most Popular Articles by this Author)

Dian Fossey and the Gorilla Killings

Recently Leaked Documents Confirm Clinton Haitian Gold Scheme

Should the World Boycott the Beijing Olympics? The Horrific Story of the Falun Gong

Haiti Watch: Disease Threatens Infants and No Plans to Stop It

Bakken Oil: Fighting for Control of Fort Berthold and the Three Affiliated Tribes

"Sticks in Vaginas:" This Is What a Massacre Looks Like