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A Crisis Worse than ISIS? Bail-Ins Begin

By   Follow Me on Twitter     Message Ellen Brown       (Page 1 of 3 pages)     Permalink

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Bail-ins begin.
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While the mainstream media focus on ISIS extremists, a threat that has gone virtually unreported is that your life savings could be wiped out in a massive derivatives collapse. Bank bail-ins have begun in Europe, and the infrastructure is in place in the US. Poverty also kills.

At the end of November, an Italian pensioner hanged himself after his entire --100,000 savings were confiscated in a bank "rescue" scheme. He left a suicide note blaming the bank, where he had been a customer for 50 years and had invested in bank-issued bonds. But he might better have blamed the EU and the G20's Financial Stability Board, which have imposed an "Orderly Resolution" regime that keeps insolvent banks afloat by confiscating the savings of investors and depositors. Some 130,000 shareholders and junior bond holders suffered losses in the "rescue."

The pensioner's bank was one of four small regional banks that had been put under special administration over the past two years. The --3.6 billion ($3.83 billion) rescue plan launched by the Italian government uses a newly-formed National Resolution Fund, which is fed by the country's healthy banks. But before the fund can be tapped, losses must be imposed on investors; and in January, EU rules will require that they also be imposed on depositors. According to a December 10th article on BBC.com:

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The rescue was a "bail-in" -- meaning bondholders suffered losses -- unlike the hugely unpopular bank bailouts during the 2008 financial crisis, which cost ordinary EU taxpayers tens of billions of euros.

Correspondents say [Italian Prime Minister] Renzi acted quickly because in January, the EU is tightening the rules on bank rescues -- they will force losses on depositors holding more than --100,000, as well as bank shareholders and bondholders .

. . . [L]etting the four banks fail under those new EU rules next year would have meant "sacrificing the money of one million savers and the jobs of nearly 6,000 people".

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That is what is predicted for 2016: massive sacrifice of savings and jobs to prop up a "systemically risky" global banking scheme.

Bail-in Under Dodd-Frank

That is all happening in the EU. Is there reason for concern in the US?

According to former hedge fund manager Shah Gilani, writing for Money Morning, there is. In a November 30th article titled "Why I'm Closing My Bank Accounts While I Still Can," he writes:

[It is] entirely possible in the next banking crisis that depositors in giant too-big-to-fail failing banks could have their money confiscated and turned into equity shares. . . .

If your too-big-to-fail (TBTF) bank is failing because they can't pay off derivative bets they made, and the government refuses to bail them out, under a mandate titled "Adequacy of Loss-Absorbing Capacity of Global Systemically Important Banks in Resolution," approved on Nov. 16, 2014, by the G20's Financial Stability Board, they can take your deposited money and turn it into shares of equity capital to try and keep your TBTF bank from failing.

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Once your money is deposited in the bank, it legally becomes the property of the bank. Gilani explains:

Your deposited cash is an unsecured debt obligation of your bank. It owes you that money back.

If you bank with one of the country's biggest banks, who collectively have trillions of dollars of derivatives they hold "off balance sheet" (meaning those debts aren't recorded on banks' GAAP balance sheets), those debt bets have a superior legal standing to your deposits and get paid back before you get any of your cash.

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Ellen Brown is an attorney, founder of the Public Banking Institute, and author of twelve books including the best-selling WEB OF DEBT. In THE PUBLIC BANK SOLUTION, her latest book, she explores successful public banking models historically and (more...)
 

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