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Jack Marshall

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Jack Marshall is the President and founder of ProEthics, and the primary writer and editor of The Ethics Scoreboard. A graduate of Harvard College, where he specialized in American Government and leadership, and Georgetown University Law Center, he practiced criminal law in Massachusetts and organization law in the District of Columbia, and led non-profit organizations devoted to education, public policy research, and health. He currently teaches legal ethics at the Washington College of Law as an adjunct professor. Marshall's articles on topics ranging from leadership to ethics to popular culture have appeared in The Federal Lawyer, Newsday, Trial Magazine, and several state bar publications. His commentary has been featured on local radio shows, National Public Radio, the Montel Williams Show, and PBS's Religion and Ethics Weekly. He is the co-author, with Pulitzer Prize winning historian Ed Larson, of The Essential Words and Writings of Clarence Darrow.

www.ethicsscoreboard.com

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(2 comments) SHARE More Sharing        Saturday, January 24, 2009
Sour Notes on a Symbolic Day The deception of pretending to have a quartet play live at the swearing-in ceremony, when the nation really heard a recording, may seem like trivia to some. But this ceremony, on this day, at this time, was a moment to celebrate honesty, and integrity, and using fakery to solve a logistical problem should have been rejected. If the weather was too cold for the great musicians to play, the solution was to tell the truth.