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Independence Day And Democracy

By Kamala Sarup  Posted by Kamala Budhathoki Sarup (about the submitter)       (Page 1 of 1 pages)     Permalink    (# of views)   No comments

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Independence Day And Democracy

On July 2, 1776, the Continental Congress, the informal governing body
among the 13 rebellious British colonies, approved a "Resolution of
Independence" introduced on June 7 by delegate Richard Henry Lee of
Virginia. At this time, from the American point of view, the 13
colonies ceased to exist; that is, they were then 13 independent
(sovereign) nations. However, Great Britain continued to view them as
rebellious colonies and attempted unsuccessfully during the next five
years to subdue them with force.

On July 4,  1776, the Continental Congress approved a formal Declaration
of Independence, drafted by Thomas Jefferson and other committee
members. This is the first document representing some unity among The
United States of America (the first time this name is formally used) and July 4, is the traditional date for celebrating the independence of the
U.S.A.

Trick question: When did the American colonists become independent from
Great Britain? Answer would be 3/1/81 when Articles of Confederation were approved by the 13 states.

November 15, 1777. Congress approves the Articles of Confederation, which are sent to the states for unanimous ratification.

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March 1, 1781. The Articles of Confederation become effective with Maryland's ratification, the last of 13 states. This is the first document of the "United States of America".

June 21, 1788. New Hampshire becomes the 9th state to ratify the Constitution, enabling the Constitution to become the "supreme law of the land". However, Alexander Hamilton, who has been tallying, realizes that without NY and VA, the two most populous states, the Constitution doesn't amount to much, so he keeps counting.

September 13, 1788. The Confederation Congress fixes the first Wed. in January, 1789, for electoral college selection by states, the first Wed. in February for the college to elect a president and V.P., and the first Wed. in March, 1789 for the new Constitution to take effect under the new Congress.

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February 4, 1789. The Electoral College, composed of 69 state electors, each with 2 votes, unanimously elects George Washington president. John Adams, who receives 34 votes, becomes V.P. Other candidates receive the remaining votes.

March 4, 1789. The first Federal Congress (formally, the "Congress of the United States") meets in New York City at Federal Hall. The U. S. Constitution becomes effective on this date after the Congress is notified by George Washington that 11 states (NY and VA are now included) have ratified the new Constitution. The Confederation Congress under the Articles of Confederation ceases to exist.

April 6, 1789. Congress has a quorum in both houses after a delay caused by bad weather. (The House of Representatives had a quorum on April 1.) It counts the electoral votes and announces George Washington president and John Adams V.P.

On July 2, 1776, the Continental Congress, the informal governing body among the 13 rebellious British colonies, approved a "Resolution of Independence" introduced on June 7 by delegate Richard Henry Lee of Virginia. At this time, from the American point of view, the 13 colonies ceased to exist; that is, they were then 13 independent (sovereign) nations. However, Great Britain continued to view them as
rebellious colonies and attempted unsuccessfully during the next five
years to subdue them with force.

Iraq War

Some peace advocates are clamoring for end of US involvement in Iraq. I don't see anything good about Iraq, either for Iraqis or for Americans. Because of the many ethnic, religious animosities in Iraq and its unfamiliarity with democratic institutions, I don't see how it can survive as a democracy after the US leaves. Spending money on the war just increases the national debt.

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Terrorists Attack

As many hindsight analyses have shown, US leaders and indulgent voters from all parties since the 1970s have been remiss in gaging the seriousness of fundamentalist terrorism. It took the 9/11 disaster to awaken them.

Journalist and Story Writer Kamala Sarup is specialising in in-depth reporting and writing on Peace, Anti War, Women, Terrorism, Democracy, and Development. Some of her publications are: Empowerment in South Asia, Nepal (Booklet). Prevention of trafficking in women through media,(Book) Efforts to Prevent Trafficking in for Media Activism (Media research). Two Stories collections.

 

 

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Journalist, poet and editor Kamala Budhathoki Sarup specializes in reporting news and writing stories covering Freedom, Peace, Public health, Democracy, Women/Children, development, justice and advocacy from her location inside the United (more...)
 

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