Power of Story
Send a Tweet        
- Advertisement -

Share on Google Plus Share on Twitter Share on Facebook 1 Share on LinkedIn Share on PInterest Share on Fark! Share on Reddit Share on StumbleUpon Tell A Friend (1 Shares)  

Printer Friendly Page Save As Favorite View Favorites (# of views)   2 comments
OpEdNews Op Eds

Will US Grasp Putin's Syria Lifeline?

By       Message Robert Parry     Permalink
      (Page 1 of 3 pages)
Related Topic(s): ; ; ; , Add Tags Add to My Group(s)

Must Read 2   Well Said 1   Valuable 1  
View Ratings | Rate It

opednews.com Headlined to H2 9/23/15

Author 1553
Become a Fan
  (84 fans)
- Advertisement -

Reprinted from Consortium News


Iranian President Hassan Rouhani (left) shakes hands with Russian President Vladimir Putin at the Shanghai Cooperation Organization summit in the Kyrgyz capital of Bishkek on Sept. 13, 2013.
(Image by (Photo credit: Press TV))
  Permission   Details   DMCA

Russian President Vladimir Putin has thrown U.S. policymakers what amounts to a lifeline to pull them out of the quicksand that is the Syrian war, but Official Washington's neocons and the mainstream U.S. news media are growling about Putin's audacity and challenging his motives.

- Advertisement -

For instance, The New York Times' lead editorial on Monday accused Putin of "dangerously building up Russia's military presence" in Syria, even though Putin's stated goal is to help crush the Sunni jihadists in the Islamic State and other extremist movements.

Instead, the Times harrumphs about Putin using his upcoming speech to the United Nations General Assembly "to make the case for an international coalition against the Islamic State, apparently ignoring the one already being led by the United States."

The Times then reprises the bizarre neocon argument that the best way to solve the threat from the Islamic State, Al Qaeda and other jihadist forces is to eliminate Syrian President Bashar al-Assad and his military who have been the principal obstacles to an outright victory by the Sunni terrorist groups.

- Advertisement -

The dreamy Times/neocon prescription continues to be that "regime change" in Damascus would finally lead to the emergence of the mythical "moderate" rebels who would somehow prevail over the far more numerous and far better armed extremists. This perspective ignores the fact that after a $500 million training project for these "moderates," the U.S. military says four or five fighters are now on the battlefield inside Syria. In other words, the members of this U.S.-trained brigade can be counted on the fingers of one hand.

But rather than rethink Official Washington's goofy "group think" on Syria -- or provide readers a fuller history of the Syrian conflict -- the Times moves on to blame Putin for the mess.

"No one should be fooled about Russia's culpability in Syria's agony," the Times writes. "Mr. Putin could have helped prevent the fighting that has killed more than 250,000 Syrians and displaced millions more, had he worked with other major powers in 2011 to keep Mr. Assad from waging war on his people following peaceful antigovernment protests. " Mr. Assad would probably be gone without the weapons aid and other assistance from Russia and Iran."

This "group think" ignores the early role of Sunni extremists in killing police and soldiers and thus provoking the harsh retaliation that followed. But the Syrian narrative, according to The New York Times, is that the "white-hat" protesters were simply set upon by the "black-hat" government.

The Times' simplistic storyline fits neatly with what the influential neoconservatives want the West to believe, since the neocons have had Syria on their "regime change" list, alongside Iraq and Iran, since the list was compiled as part of Israeli leader Benjamin Netanyahu's 1996 political campaign. The Times' narrative also leaves out the crucial role of Turkey, Saudi Arabia, Qatar and other U.S. "allies" in supporting Al Qaeda and its Islamic State spinoff.

Bush's Unaccounted-for Cash

- Advertisement -

Further complicating Official Washington's let's-blame-Putin Syrian narrative is the unintended role of President George W. Bush and the U.S. military in laying the groundwork for these brutal Sunni extremist movements through the invasion of Iraq last decade. After all, it was only in reaction to the U.S. military presence that "Al Qaeda in Iraq" took root in Iraqi and then Syrian territory.

Not only did the ouster and execution of Sunni leader Saddam Hussein alienate the region's Sunnis, but Bush's desperation to avert an outright military defeat in Iraq during his second term led him to authorize the payment of billions of dollars to Sunni fighters to get them to stop shooting at American soldiers and to give Bush time to negotiate a U.S. troop withdrawal.

Beginning in 2006, those U.S. payments to Sunni fighters to get them to suspend their resistance were central to what was then called the "Sunni Awakening." Though the program preceded Bush's "surge" of troops in 2007, the bought-and-paid-for truce became central to what Official Washington then hailed as the "successful surge" or "victory at last."

Besides the billions of dollars paid out in pallets of U.S. cash to Sunni insurgents, Bush's "surge" cost the lives of another 1,000 U.S. soldiers and killed a countless number of Iraqis, many just going about their daily lives until they were blown apart by powerful American munitions. [See, for example, the "Collateral Murder" video leaked by Pvt. Bradley/Chelsea Manning]

But what the U.S. intelligence community is only now assessing is the collateral damage caused by the bribes that the Bush administration paid to Sunni insurgents. Some of the cash appears to have become seed money for the transformation of "Al Qaeda in Iraq" into the Islamic State as Sunnis, who continued to be disenfranchised by Iraq's Shiite-dominated government, expanded their sectarian war into Syria.

Besides the Iraqi Sunnis, Syria's secular government, with Assad and other key leaders from the Alawite branch of Shiite Islam, also was set upon by home-grown Sunni extremists and foreign jihadists, some of whom joined the Islamic State but mostly coalesced around Al Qaeda's Nusra Front and other radical forces. Though the Islamic State had originated as "Al Qaeda in Iraq" (or AQI), it evolved into an even more bloodthirsty force and, in Syria, split off from Al Qaeda central.

Next Page  1  |  2  |  3

 

- Advertisement -

Must Read 2   Well Said 1   Valuable 1  
View Ratings | Rate It

http://www.consortiumnews.com

Robert Parry broke many of the Iran-Contra stories in the 1980s for the Associated Press and Newsweek. His latest book, Secrecy & Privilege: Rise of the Bush Dynasty from Watergate to Iraq, can be ordered at secrecyandprivilege.com. It's also available at
(more...)
 

Share on Google Plus Submit to Twitter Add this Page to Facebook! Share on LinkedIn Pin It! Add this Page to Fark! Submit to Reddit Submit to Stumble Upon



Go To Commenting
/* The Petition Site */
The views expressed in this article are the sole responsibility of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of this website or its editors.

Writers Guidelines

Contact AuthorContact Author Contact EditorContact Editor Author PageView Authors' Articles
- Advertisement -

Most Popular Articles by this Author:     (View All Most Popular Articles by this Author)

The CIA/Likud Sinking of Jimmy Carter

What Did US Spy Satellites See in Ukraine?

Ron Paul's Appalling World View

Ronald Reagan: Worst President Ever?

The Disappearance of Keith Olbermann

A Perjurer on the US Supreme Court