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Positive News    H5'ed 4/2/21

The Prison-Ashram Project

Author 71296
Message Blair Gelbond

Bo Lozoff
Bo Lozoff
(Image by Wikipedia (commons.wikimedia.org), Author: Steven (artwithhearts.com))
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Bo Lozoff, Director of the Prison Ashram Project was a dear friend (and friend/guide to so many more). He was also someone from whom I learned a tremendous amount. He died in a motorcycle accident in 2012, but not before leaving a prodigious cultural legacy.

History

In 1973 former Harvard psychology professor and current spiritual teacher, Ram Dass, had been sending his book Be Here Now into prisons and receiving many letters back.

Incarcerated inmates wrote about their personal transformations and also asked a variety of challenging questions. Ram Dass"-informed Bo and his wife Sita that he was overwhelmed by the prospect of responding to them all. Bo and Sita had felt a personal connection with Ram Dass's book, as well as with the prison population, because their own brother-in-law who was incarcerated. They realized that prisoners were essentially leading a monastic life rather similar to the one they were living at an ashram in North Carolina."-In this way the Prison-Ashram Project was born.

By 1987, the flow of requests had grown so large that they formed their own foundation, The Human Kindness Foundation, and focused on responding to letters from inmates, teaching yoga and meditation in prisons, writing spiritual books, sending them to inmates, and preparing inmates for leading a life of service-whether they ever got out of prison or not. The goal was helping others use this unique "opportunity" for personal transformation. Inmates could choose to be "cons" - or monks/nuns in an unusual and difficult situation. It was up to them.

What followed was more than 30 years in which Bo traveled around the world giving talks in hundreds of prisons, churches and community centers. His various roles included author, spiritual teacher, friend, counselor, musician, and modern-day mystic/awakener.

Bo's focus was on those most shunned by society. The genuine wisdom and love that passed through him flowed onto the pages of his books, the letters he exchanged (and published in his books with permission) and into the hearts of people locked in cells - or in their own minds.

Bo's uniqueness isn't easy to define. I can describe him as a "street-wise mystic." He was able to go toe-to-toe with rapists, murderers, etc. - speaking their language and meeting their challenges - while clearly articulating a non-denominational, heart-centered spiritual context for their lives - and to do so with love, humility and wisdom. Speaking simply as a human being, he was able to embrace both the potential for light and the deep darkness within individuals.

Bo was by no means a perfect person. He did not always handle the power he possessed well. In spite of his flaws, he was able to reach countless people who all else had abandoned. He made a powerful contribution to "the least of these," in enabling them to radically transform their lives. And he held out the promise of genuine enlightenment for prisoners, prison workers, prison clergy, and many others.

My Prison Work

Bo inspired me to teach and offer psychotherapy in the prison system. I found it incredibly rewarding (even though inmates desperately wanted out, and I voluntarily entered the high security lock-up every day!).

I had a mental-set that worked for me. I saw some inmates as soaking wet wood: no one would be able to light a fire of awareness in them any time soon. If I had encountered them in the past, I would simply wave when I saw them in the yard.

I perceived others as crisp, dry wood. They were ready for transformation. All that was needed was a match. I regarded a third category as "damp wood." With multiple attempts to light the fire of love and awareness in them, some would finally burst into flame. It was the pain of incarceration that acted as a goad to encourage growth and change. As the saying goes: "A diamond is a piece of coal that made good under pressure."

Anyone who is familiar with the American prison system is aware that it is a hell-hole. While there are kind and honest correctional officers, I had to agree with a colleague who described many of them as "criminals with badges." This is the way of "retributive justice," that pervades our penal system.

It did not deter Bo from offering inmates the opportunity to use their suffering as a form of Grace and a fire of purification.

Sample letters from inmates:

"But something kept telling me not to just read this to help pass the hours away but to read it and keep it in my heart and mind. So, each day I've been applying some of the things that I read to my daily life, and I've been like a new person.

"When I got your letter today, I noticed my hands were shaking as I was taking it out of the envelope. Well, as I started to read, I felt a warmth come over me as I have never felt before, and a voice within stilled my fears and seemed to say that at last you're coming home and you have no need to fear ever again.

"As I read on, I noticed that I kept having trouble seeing and my face felt like it was on fire. So, I reached up and started to rub my eyes and it was only then that I realized that I had tears in my eyes and running down my face. Then they came freely as I knelt and thanked God for that little book and for you and all the others that are trying to bring the world together to live in harmony with each other and with God.

"It has been a long time since I was able to let my heart open up and let myself really be free and feel again. I sincerely believe that this would not have been possible had it not been for the prison-ashram project and for people like you."

Dear Bo,

""What I've read though seems to be what I've been searching for, for so long. I'm searching for my spiritual awakening that so far, I've not been able to find, but my life has come to a point where I need to find myself before I'm lost in the terrible maze of un-knowing.

"Let me take a few minutes to tell you a little about myself and my present situation. Hopefully it will help you to know what it is I'm trying to find. My name is Tommy, I'm in my mid-20's, born Sept. -, 195-. I'm presently in the Idaho State prison for first degree murder, two counts. I was arrested in November of 1974, taken to trial, found guilty and sentenced to death, March of 1976. In October of 1977, the Idaho Supreme Court vacated my death penalty, but I'm under review to receive a newly enacted death penalty in May of this year. At that time the courts will decide if I can be given the new death penalty or a double life sentence.

"These two charges in Idaho aren't the only ones I have. There are seven more in other states. Please let me explain why I did these cold-blooded, without any mercy, killings. In April of 1974, 11 men entered my home in Portland, Oregon, raped my 17-year-old wife, who was three months pregnant at the time, then threw her four stories out our apartment window"


May 17, 197-

Dear Tommy,

"Your letter has touched me and Sita deeply.

You're a beautiful brother and we're very happy to know you. In one sense, you're coming from a very unusual place; yet in another sense, you're in exactly the same place we all are - simply a being who's becoming conscious of the journey to God, and wondering what you can do to get on with it.

"The first step is to begin quieting the mind, and this is what meditation is all about. All the answers you need are already within you (and always have been), but the noisy mind can't hear them clearly. Noise comes in the form of desire, anger, fear, greed, self-pity, guilt, shame, doubt, unworthiness, pride, selfishness, pettiness, envy, and so forth. The way most of us are raised, our lives are pretty much a confusing combination of such noise from the time we wake up in the morning until we drop off to sleep each night.

"No wonder we get so tired!

"Daily meditation practice helps us to begin hearing it all a lot more clearly, and also gives us the strength and discipline to live in harmony with what we hear. As one of our prison friends often ends his letters, 'No one said it would be easy.' But as our meditations deepen and we begin experiencing higher and higher states of awareness, these experiences help us to put our life-dramas in proper perspective. The physical world is not the whole show; this one body and lifetime are not what we're all about.

"The game is far bigger than we usually imagine, and every thought, word and deed counts; nothing goes unnoticed and nothing happens by chance. There's no slippage in the system whatsoever.

"So, I wake up after having fallen asleep at the wheel and crashing head-on into a tractor trailer in a 12- mph collision. My body is heavily damaged for the rest of this lifetime, at the age of 18. My choices are to regret, to 'cope,' to b*tch, or to simply see things exactly where they are and plan my strategy accordingly. Remember, no 'accidents.'

"You're in a similar position, waking up after having murdered nine people. You may never be allowed to live on the street again in this lifetime, which imposes certain physical limitations on you, much as my wreck did on me. Your choices are similar too. Funny thing is, though, that my wreck and your murder rap were the events that spurred us to get on with it. At some very deep points in meditation, we begin to see the irony that the parts of our lives which we had always considered our greatest tragedies were those parts that moved us closer and closer to God.

"Besides meditation practice (which you can easily learn from the enclosed materials), I suggest you study the principle of karma. For people with particularly heavy life-stories, I think it's important to understand karma as clearly as possible. It's far different from sin/guilt/repentance, and in truth there's not really such a thing as 'good' karma or 'bad' karma. Karma is simply a bundle of unfinished business which results from the things we do, think and feel.

"Part of the spiritual journey is first to recognize, then to accept, then to resolve, our karma. Since acts done consciously and without attachment create no karma, the strategy becomes a matter of working through more karma each day than we create. In this way, our bundle, or burden, becomes lighter all the time until we finally become "enlightened" of it all and are free beings like the Christ.

"Of course, all of this is much easier said than done. Have compassion for yourself and be patient, and remember 'no one said it would be easy.' In fact, it may be the second hardest journey in the world.

"But the hardest is to live in any other way at all. Nothing really makes it except to become whole. "Much, much Light for your Journey to freedom; please keep in touch."

Love,

Bo

 

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Blair Gelbond Social Media Pages: Facebook page url on login Profile not filled in       Twitter page url on login Profile not filled in       Linkedin page url on login Profile not filled in       Instagram page url on login Profile not filled in

I work as a psychotherapist with an emphasis on transformational learning - a blend of psychoanalytic and transpersonal approaches, and am the author of Self Actualization and Unselfish Love and co-author of Families Helping Families: (more...)
 

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3 people are discussing this page, with 11 comments  Post Comment


Blair Gelbond

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"Rejoining your Source [is] becoming a modern-day sorcerer.

"As Carlos Castaneda explained, 'The task of sorcerers was to face infinity and plunge into it daily, as a fisherman plunges into the sea.'"

Wayne Dyer

**

"Until we reflect basic kindness in everything we do, our political gestures will be fleeting and fragile. Simple kindness may be the most vital key to the riddle of how human beings can live with each other in peace...and care properly for this planet we all share."

Bo Lozoff

Submitted on Friday, Apr 2, 2021 at 2:10:45 PM

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b. sadie bailey

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Wonderful, inspirational article. Be Here Now and Ram Dass's teachings saved a lot of lives. Thank you for your work with prisoners and for this tribute to your friend, Bo Lozoff. Also thank you for showing the heart and humanity of these prisoners who are ready to awaken - things are never as they seem from the outside and no one of us can judge another's insides by their outside.

Submitted on Friday, Apr 2, 2021 at 6:27:01 PM

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Blair Gelbond

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Thank you, b. sadie,

Since our society us always looking for someone or something to demonize, prisoners are a perfect candidate. I found a great many to be lost, and/or having come from abusive or neglectful homes that took a toll on their character structure.

For me the starting point was being willing to see God or Divinity at their core - and then allowing space for us to see whether the person could reach beyond their character to the potential evolution that might flower. Some yes; some no. And for some, the suffering of being incarcerated would push them to reach for higher ground.

Bo wrote a book called, We're All Doing Time (double entendre intended). Because things on our planet seem to be heading for some dark places, I'd like to recommend a new book by Andrew Harvey and Carolyn Baker - Radical Regeneration: Birthing the New Human in an Age of Extinction.

Submitted on Friday, Apr 2, 2021 at 7:36:41 PM

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tim mcghie

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Very interesting article Blair. Thank you for sharing.

Submitted on Saturday, Apr 3, 2021 at 3:18:55 PM

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Blair Gelbond

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Thank you, Tim for responding.

Lozoff was a inspiration for me and many others.

Submitted on Saturday, Apr 3, 2021 at 4:14:39 PM

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Essay from Bo Lozoff:

Final Endings and Fresh Beginnings

As this whole millennium draws to a close in just a few days, the comedians and columnists, the talk shows and merchants and beer companies, the party stores and cruise lines, will be having a field day making money off the whole thing, and I guess there's nothing wrong in having a great excuse to party.

But you can use this major event in deeper ways as well. You can look honestly at your own life, at the parts that bring you shame, despair or frustration, and the parts that spark your hope and faith and determination. You can look at the best and worst of yourself, and create a ritual of some kind to leave the worst behind you, and create a new and better life in the next millennium.

Changing for the better is one of the most fundamental human urgings, yet we are more sophisticated about how to use high-tech cell phones and VCR's than how to change bad habits into good ones. We may go round and round the same circles all our lives rather than consider that we're not seeing our behavior patterns clearly, or we may be failing to respect the process of change itself.

This is not new territory. Two thousand years ago, St. Paul lamented:

"My own behavior baffles me. I find myself not doing what I really want to do, but doing what I really loathe. "I often find that I have the will to do good, but not the power. That is, I don't accomplish the good I set out to do, and the evil I don't really want to do I find I am always doing. What a wretched man I am!" Romans, 7: 15-24

Is there even one of us who has not shared St. Paul's frustration? Yet we know that changeeven major, enormous changeis still possible. Let's not overlook the fact that, for all his self-proclaimed wretchedness, Paul went on to become a saint.

(con't)

Submitted on Sunday, Apr 4, 2021 at 1:59:00 PM

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So, how about you? How about, for the sake of the world, leaving behind the biggest things that keep you feeling small, weak, wretched, unholy? How about entering this new era with firm resolve to bring your life in line with your deepest, noblest beliefs? I

f you dislike yourself for smoking, then make this the last and final time you stop smoking. Same with drinking, drugs, stealing, scamming, and anything else that makes you feel low.

Seize this opportunity to make a new beginning. Say it, do it, and stick to it. We need you to become your true self! We have a saying around Kindness House: You can do hard. The reason we say this is that in modern times, the words "it's too hard" have become an anthem for giving up.

The message is: Have an ache or pain, reach for a pill; get depressed because you lose your job, take Prozac. A friend once confided to me that she regretted divorcing her husband. She said the only reason she did it was a prevailing attitude among her friends that "If it gets really hard, why make yourself suffer?" Maybe we have become convinced that we can't do hard things. You can do hard is a way of reminding yourself that you need not run away in fear just because something is greatly challenging. You can do challenging. It might even be scary, but you can do scary. You can do hard. Really, you can.

(con't)

Submitted on Sunday, Apr 4, 2021 at 2:04:28 PM

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Blair Gelbond

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Don't let a shallow culture fool you into thinking you'll crumble when the chips are down. Human beings were designed for the chips to be down sometimes. Imagine a runner who begins a race and, after running twenty yards, has to jump over a hurdle. Damn it, what's this thing doing here? It's in my way! Another twenty yards, another hurdle. Damn! Then another, and another. His annoyance grows into anger; he loses focus; he risks injury; he loses steam.

But knowing from the outset that the race is actually a hurdle event puts everything in a completely different perspective, doesn't it? The same effort is required, the same hurdles need to be jumped, but now they are part of the challenge instead of being unwelcome obstacles. Bad habits and qualities or situations that need to be changed are hurdles in our lives, not obstacles.

We waste enormous power if we misunderstand this. In these last days of 1999, there are far too many wars and prisons, far too much poverty and hopelessness; but also many great things happening among committed spiritual seekers and social activists. You and I have an opportunity to be on either side of the balance.

The world really needs us to become joyful and enlightened human beings. What do you think? I beg you, for the sake of us all, to make at least one serious, major change by New Year's Eve. Step into the new century with renewed commitment to yourself and the world. The teachings, principles and practices are right here within your reach. And the need has never been greater.

Submitted on Sunday, Apr 4, 2021 at 2:06:16 PM

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The new millennium was met with the pronouncement that the number of people incarcerated in U.S. prisons had reached the 2 million mark; by 2020 the number was 2.3 million; the United States leads the world in producing prisoners, according to data maintained by the International Center for Prison Studies at King's College London.

A 2008 article in the New York Times states: "Criminologists and legal scholars in other industrialized nations say they are mystified and appalled by the number and length of American prison sentences."

In the process of a rapid increase in population and crime rate during the last century it required 90 years - from 1900 until 1990 to reach the 1 million mark. This number was doubled in the last 10 years; more young black males are now in prison than in college.

A recent study concluded that over the past twenty years, expenditures for crime control have increased twice as fast as military spending. Crime control is now estimated to cost $100 billion annually.

These facts and figures and the horrific human suffering they represent are overwhelming. And this is actually part of the problem: our prison situation is so extreme it is easier to avoid thinking about it than to struggle toward a solution. There is little appreciation of the true complexity of the situation. Common simplistic solutions and snap judgments that rely on fear and scapegoating prevail.

As Bo Lozoff succinctly puts it:

"We've been led to imagine a legion of heartless monsters plotting to get out and hurt us again. The truth is, most prison inmates are confused, disorganized, and often pathetic individuals who would love to turn their lives around if given a realistic chance.

"Unfortunately, many of those nonviolent offenders will no longer be nonviolent by the time they leave prison. Prisons are not scaring offenders away from crime; they are incapacitating them so they are hardly fit for anything else" Many wardens, judges, and other officials know this, but it has become political suicide to admit it publicly."

Submitted on Monday, Apr 5, 2021 at 2:18:53 PM

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At a recent convocation of the UN Committee Against Torture in Geneva, Switzerland Amnesty International submitted an extensive brief entitled: 'UN Committee Against Torture Must Condemn Increasing Institutionalized Cruelty in USA.' It reads:

"The spiraling prison and jail population...and the resulting pressures on incarceration facilities have contributed to widespread mistreatment of men, women, and children in custody. The US government has shown reluctance to adhere to international human rights law and to accept the same minimum standards for its own conduct that it so often demands from other countries."

The degrading conditions to which Amnesty International is referring include: severe overcrowding, frequent rapes and beatings, prolonged and arbitrary use of solitary confinement, grossly unsanitary living conditions and deprivation of elementary medical care. In terms of public safety, these practices (and policies which allow them to flourish) are "no-win" solutions for all.

In his groundbreaking book Violence, Reflections on an American Epidemic Gilligan states that as a nation we seem to have lost sight of the fact that punishing a criminal in this way does not protect the public; instead, it runs the serious risk of releasing a human time bomb back into the community - a person ready to explode the moment he or she leaves a prison setting.

Gilligan cites a 1980 court-ordered investigation of conditions in one Florida prison which found that: "assaults, rapes and stabbings were commonplace."

So prevalent was the issue of sexual assault that one correction officer said that a young inmate's chances of avoiding rape were "'almost zero.... He'll get raped within the first twenty-four hours to forty-eight hours. That's almost standard.'"

Submitted on Monday, Apr 5, 2021 at 2:27:15 PM

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