Send a Tweet
Most Popular Choices
Share on Facebook 2 Share on Twitter Printer Friendly Page More Sharing
OpEdNews Op Eds    H4'ed 2/27/14

The Legacy of Chokwe Lumumba Must Not Be Buried With the Man

By       (Page 1 of 2 pages)     (# of views)   No comments
Author 29155
Follow Me on Twitter     Message John Nichols
Become a Fan
  (23 fans)

Source: The Nation


(Image by (Photo: Natalie Manor/ Wikimedia Commons))   Details   DMCA
- Advertisement -

Chokwe Lumumba maintained a civil rights commitment  that was rooted in the moment when his mother showed her 8-year-old son the  Jet  magazine photograph of a beaten  Emmett Till  in his open casket. The commitment was nurtured on the streets of Detroit, where Lumumba and his mother collected money  to support the Southern Nonviolent Coordinating Committee  and the civil rights struggles of the early 1960s.

Half a century later, he would be the transformational mayor of a major Southern city, Jackson, Mississippi. But just as his tenure was taking shape, Lumumba died unexpectedly Tuesday at age 66.

The mayor's death ended an epic journey that challenged conventions, upset the status quo and proved the potential of electoral politics to initiate radical change -- even in a conservative Southern state.

As a young man, inspired by the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.'s struggle to address "infectious discrimination, racism and apartheid," and shocked into a deeper activism by King's assassination, Lumumba changed his name from Edwin Taliaferro -- taking his new first name from an African tribe that had resisted slavery and his new last name from the Congolese independence leader Patrice Lumumba.

- Advertisement -

Chokwe Lumumba became a human rights lawyer "defending political prisoners." His clients would eventually include former Black Panthers and rapper Tupac Shakur. His remarkable list of legal accomplishments included his key role in the 2010 decision of Mississippi Governor Haley Barbour to suspend the sentences of Jamie and Gladys Scott, Mississippi sisters who were released after serving 16 years of consecutive life sentences for an $11 robbery -- a punishment that came to be understood as a glaring example of the extreme over-sentencing of African-Americans.

Click Here to Read Whole Article

Next Page  1  |  2

 

- Advertisement -

Rate It | View Ratings

John Nichols Social Media Pages: Facebook page url on login Profile not filled in       Twitter page url on login Profile not filled in       Linkedin page url on login Profile not filled in       Instagram page url on login Profile not filled in

John Nichols, a pioneering political blogger, has written the Online Beat since 1999. His posts have been circulated internationally, quoted in numerous books and mentioned in debates on the floor of Congress.

Nichols writes about (more...)
 

Related Topic(s): ; ; , Add Tags
Add to My Group(s)
Go To Commenting
The views expressed herein are the sole responsibility of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of this website or its editors.
Writers Guidelines
Contact AuthorContact Author Contact EditorContact Editor Author PageView Authors' Articles
Support OpEdNews

OpEdNews depends upon can't survive without your help.

If you value this article and the work of OpEdNews, please either Donate or Purchase a premium membership.

STAY IN THE KNOW
If you've enjoyed this, sign up for our daily or weekly newsletter to get lots of great progressive content.
Daily Weekly     OpEdNews Newsletter
Name
Email
   (Opens new browser window)
 

Most Popular Articles by this Author:     (View All Most Popular Articles by this Author)

Paul Ryan? Seriously?

Scott Walker's Austerity Agenda Yields 'Worst Job Losses in US'

What the Hell Is Wrong With Paul Ryan?

The Koch Brothers, ALEC and the Savage Assault on Democracy

GM's Plant Closures Confirm the President is a Liar and a Fool

The Deafening Silence of the Republican Field in the Wake of the Planned Parenthood Shooting