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The Egyptian Tinderbox: How Banks and Investors Are Starving the Third World

By   Follow Me on Twitter     Message Ellen Brown       (Page 1 of 4 pages)     Permalink

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                    "What for a poor man is a crust, for a rich man is a securitized asset class."

 

                     --Futures trader Ann Berg, quoted in the UK Guardian

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Underlying the sudden, volatile uprising in Egypt and Tunisia is a growing global crisis sparked by soaring food prices and unemployment.   The Associated Press reports that roughly 40 percent of Egyptians struggle along at the World Bank-set poverty level of under $2 per day.   Analysts estimate that food price inflation in Egypt is currently at an unsustainable 17 percent yearly.   In poorer countries, as much as 60 to 80 percent of people's incomes go for food, compared to just 10 to 20 percent in industrial countries.   An increase of a dollar or so in the cost of a gallon of milk or a loaf of bread for Americans can mean starvation for people in Egypt and other poor countries.

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The cause of the recent jump in global food prices remains a matter of debate.   Some analysts blame the Federal Reserve's "quantitative easing" program (increasing the money supply with credit created with accounting entries), which they warn is sparking hyperinflation.   Too much money chasing too few goods is the classic explanation for rising prices.  

The problem with that theory is that the global money supply has actually shrunk since 2006, when food prices began their dramatic rise.   Virtually all money today is created on the books of banks as "credit" or "debt," and overall lending has shrunk.   This has occurred in an accelerating process of deleveraging (paying down or writing off loans and not making new ones), as the subprime housing market has collapsed and bank capital requirements have been raised.   Although it seems counterintuitive, the more debt there is, the more money there is in the system.   As debt shrinks, the money supply shrinks in tandem.  

That is why government debt today is not actually the bugaboo it is being made out to be by the deficit terrorists.   The flipside of debt is credit, and businesses run on it.   When credit collapses, trade collapses.   When private debt shrinks, public debt must therefore step in to replace it.   The "good" credit or debt is the kind used for building infrastructure and other productive capacity, increasing the Gross Domestic Product and wages; and this is the kind governments are in a position to employ.   The parasitic forms of credit or debt are the gamblers' money-making-money schemes, which add nothing to GDP.

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Prices have been driven up by too much money chasing too few goods, but the money is chasing only certain selected goods.   Food and fuel prices are up, but housing prices are down.   The net result is that overall price inflation remains low.  

While quantitative easing may not be the culprit, Fed action has driven the rush into commodities.   In response to the banking crisis of 2008, the Federal Reserve dropped the Fed funds rate (the rate at which banks borrow from each other) nearly to zero.   This has allowed banks and their customers to borrow in the U.S. at very low rates and invest abroad for higher returns, creating a dollar "carry trade."  

Meanwhile, interest rates on federal securities were also driven to very low levels, leaving investors without that safe, stable option for funding their retirements.   "Hot money" -" investment seeking higher returns -" fled from the collapsed housing market into anything but the dollar, which generally meant fleeing into commodities.  

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Ellen Brown is an attorney, founder of the Public Banking Institute, and author of twelve books including the best-selling WEB OF DEBT. In THE PUBLIC BANK SOLUTION, her latest book, she explores successful public banking models historically and (more...)
 

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